Keep Your Most Important New Year’s Resolution with Every Day Bible

every-day-bible-appIt’s resolution-making season. And to ensure your most important resolution—the one about daily Bible reading—is also the easiest to keep, we’d like you to meet the free Every Day Bible app.

Built on the reading-plan framework of Connect the Testaments, a popular calendar devotional written by Faithlife’s own John Barry and Rebecca Van Noord, Every Day Bible presents you with three manageable passages each day—one from the Old Testament, one from the New Testament, and one from the books of poetry. This approach will lead you through the entire Bible in a year. Along the way, you’ll garner a big-picture view of Scripture aided by Barry’s and Van Noord’s insights delivered in daily devotional passages.

The Every Day Bible app puts that powerful content in your pocket, so you can maintain your resolution to read Scripture even when the next year takes you unexpected places.

We kept it simple, so there’s nothing extra to learn and you can jump right into your Scripture readings each day. The result is a daily-reading app that’s easy to use. You still have total control over which types of text you’d like to read: use the settings menu to turn sections on and off if you’d prefer to focus on one particular type of text.

Each day is topped off with a piece of Bible Screen art from one of the verses covered that day. Our in-house professional design team has been illustrating a different Bible verse every day for years. Their work has taken many forms—apps, T-shirts, magnets, postcards—and we couldn’t resist putting it here to inspire you in your daily Scripture reading. And if you’d like to share the art, you can do that with just a click.

We think you’re going to love the brilliantly simple Every Day Bible app. Download it for free today, and start keeping that resolution to read Scripture.

Improve Your Bible Study in 2015

diy-bible-studyAs the calendar turns over to 2015, many of you are making New Year’s resolutions. If you’ve decided to take your Bible study to the next level this year, Lexham Press has designed a resource that makes it easier than ever. DIY Bible Study helps you step into the story of the Bible with application-focused content, beautifully designed images, and practical video tutorials.

A year-long reading plan, included with DIY Bible Study, guides you through the entire Bible in just 10 minutes a day. You’ll get an overview of the entire Bible, one study at a time. It’s designed to be accessible and flexible to fit exactly what you need to dig into the Bible.

Study with Logos 6

We built DIY Bible Study to be fully integrated into Logos Bible Software. We’re leveraging all of the amazing tools found in Logos 6, and we’ll teach you how to use them.

As you work through DIY Bible Study, your learning is framed by sections that teach you how to study the Bible. These study principles are delivered through short video lessons, like this:

Not only are you learning important study principles and methods, but you’re seeing them used within Logos Bible Software itself. You’ll learn to study the Bible and use the most powerful Bible software to accomplish your goals.

Biblical interpretation is like appreciating a Monet painting. At first, everything is a bit blurry, but once you stand farther back, you see how all the blurry shapes fit together into something beautiful. In this regard, there is absolutely no substitute for reading all of the Bible and reading it regularly; the more parts of the Bible that are in your head, the more the Bible will make sense.

The right tools and biblical interpretation methods can help you thoughtfully and accurately study the Bible for yourself and apply it to your life—seeing how everything fits together.

DIY Bible Study

Get started today!

Improve your Bible study with DIY Bible Study and Logos 6. The beginning of the year is the perfect time to get your Bible study started on the right foot.

DIY Bible Study is included in most Logos 6 base packages. You can also get it in the Lexham Bible Study Essentials Bundle, which is over 60% off to celebrate New Year’s!

3 Tips for Sticking with Daily Bible Readings

Logos-6-launch-Small-Group-300x300The new year is the perfect time for a fresh start: we get the chance to reset and create goals for ourselves in hopes of improving our lives. But even if we start the year with the best intentions of developing positive changes, they often fall by the wayside.

One common New Year’s resolution is to read Scripture, whether it’s the Old or New Testament, the entire biblical text, or even just a few verses a day.

Ultimately, it’s not about a New Year’s resolution; it’s about cultivating a daily habit of spending time in the Word.

And with Logos 6, you’ll get the tools you need to stay on track, remain accountable, and reach the goals you set out to accomplish.

Here are three ways Logos 6 will help you stay in the Word this year:

1. Get daily readings delivered to your desktop.

In Logos 6, you’ll always find your daily reading right on your homepage, making it convenient to jump right into your daily passage. Check off each passage when you’re done, then come back the next day—a new passage will be set up and ready for you.

You can start a reading plan in two different ways: either create a custom reading plan by choosing your text and breaking up the readings into manageable sections, or select a premade reading plan to take you through a specific book of the Bible, a thematic topic, or a set of seasonal readings.

Here are some premade reading plans you can choose from:

  • 5 Days on Spiritual Growth
  • 7 Days on Jesus’ Birth
  • 10 Days on Patience
  • 14 Days on Grace
  • 21 Days on Prayer
  • Advent Reading Plan
  • Luke 1 Month
  • The Bible’s Story in 30 Days
  • And many more!

Select these premade plans from either your desktop software or through the free Logos app—your selection will sync across your devices, so you can stay on track no matter where your day takes you.

2. Gain support and accountability through community.

One of the obstacles to sticking with a reading plan on your own is a lack of accountability—it can be difficult to stay motivated or to catch up if you fall behind.

Logos 6 has two types of reading plans: private and group. Group plans provide accountability and follow-through that you don’t have on your own.

If you’re part of a Faithlife Group, you can set up a plan and read together. Not only will reading together hold you accountable, but you’ll also be able to share your thoughts and insights through Community Notes.

You can create a reading plan for your Bible study group, your class, or even your entire church! Let’s say you meet with a small group once a week: instead of having to recall what you read seven days prior, you’ll be able to ask questions and share ideas as you read.

3. Map out a manageable plan in seconds.

When you create a custom reading plan, you get to set your own parameters. Just choose your Bible translation and set a schedule, and Logos will automatically break up the text and generate a plan that fits your criteria.

If you’re not sure where to start, why not go from the beginning? In fact, if you create a plan to read the entire Bible in 90 days starting January 1, you’ll be done by Easter. Your first reading will explore Genesis 1–11, exploring the story of Creation, Noah, and the Tower of Babel. Here’s a taste of what you’ll read:

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.

And God said, ‘Let there be light,’ and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.

Genesis 1:1–5

* * *

Explore reading plans for yourself and see how they can keep you on track to reach your goals this year: get Logos 6 today!

Plus, for a limited, time, take advantage of introductory discounts and save 15% on your Logos 6 purchase. If you spend at least $500, you’ll also qualify for special bonus gifts.

Master Journal Bundle: A Treasure Trove of Insights

master-journal-bundleJournals are an essential resource when it comes to identifying the intimate details of any given subject. Whether you’re doing a word study or exploring the history of a theological concept, journals can help you better understand the various subtleties found in Scripture.

Recognizing their importance in the interpretation of the Word, we’ve created the Master Journal Bundle: our largest collection of journals ever compiled. This collection contains over 1,280 volumes of journals covering a wide variety of topics, such as biblical studies, church history, practical ministry, and more. Worth over $10,000.00 in print, these digitized versions are on Pre-Pub for only $599.95.

Pre-order them today to lock in your price and help move this bundle toward production!

Journals for every student

This collection comes with a variety of journals covering a vast range of subjects. Some of the titles in this collection are:

  • Biblical Archaeologist 55–60, 6 vols. (1992–1997)
  • Bibliotheca Sacra 1–171, 171 vols. (1844–2014)
  • Bulletin for Biblical Research 1–23, 23 vols. (1991–2013)
  • Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 285–368, 84 vols. (1992–2012)
  • Churchman 1, 6, 12–13, 15–21, 32, 38–40, 42–44, 46–126, 99 vols. (1886, 1892, 1898, 1901–1907, 1918, 1924–1926, 1928–1929, 1932–2010)
  • Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal 1–18, 18 vols. (1996–2013)
  • Filología Neotestamentaria 1–22, 22 vols. (1988–2009)
  • First Things 1–25, 25 vols. (1990-2014)
  • Founders Press Journal, 92 vols. (1995–2014)
  • Journal of Biblical Apologetics 1–11, 11 vols. (2000–2008)
  • Journal of Biblical Literature 100–125, 26 vols. (1981–2006)
  • Journal of Discipleship and Family Ministry 1–4, 4 vols. (2010–2014)
  • Journal of Dispensational Theology 10–17, 8 vols. (2006–2013)
  • Journal of Hebrew Scriptures 1–11, 11 vols. (1997–2011)
  • Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages 1–37, 37 vols. (1975–2011)
  • Journal of Theological Interpretation 1–6, 6 vols. (2007–2012)
  • Letter and Spirit 1–8, 8 vols. (2005–2013)
  • And more!

You’ll also get various magazines and reviews in this collection, including:

  • Christian History and Biography Magazine 1–99, 99 issues
  • Review of Biblical Literature 1–9, 9 vols. (1998–2006)
  • And more!

Make your journals work for you

With Logos 6, you can get far more from your journals than the standard print versions. Get precise search results from all of your scholarly journals—search a verse in your Passage Guide or Sermon Starter Guide, and your results include a list of links to relevant journal articles both online and in your library. No more filtering out the results you want or performing multiple searches: now you can get results from all your journals at once.

Over a century of knowledge at your fingertips

The Master Journal Bundle can help further your study of the biblical text by offering in-depth analysis of various biblical texts and theological ideas. Formerly, access to this wealth of information was only available through libraries in a cumbersome print format. But now in Logos, you can access all of these completely searchable journals at a fraction of the cost. Make sure to take advantage of the Pre-Pub price of $599.95!

Pre-order the Master Journal Bundle and add a wealth of understanding to your library.

Logos 6: See and Read Only Highlighted Text

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

If you’re like me, while reading a print book, you like marking up important points. Likewise, for years we’ve been able to highlight text in our Logos resources. Now, in Logos 6, we can go one step further. We can actually extract, view, and read just those highlights we’ve made in a book!

Here’s how:

  • Open a resource, such as Alone with God
  • Choose Tools | Highlighting
  • Expand a palette such as highlighter pens (A)
  • Select some text in the resource (B)
  • Click a style, such as green highlighter (C)

morris-proctor-see-and-read-only-highlighted-text-1

  • Continue highlighting text as you desire
  • Open another resource, such as Moral Foundations of Life
  • Highlight text in this resource as well (D)

morris-proctor-see-and-read-only-highlighted-text-2

By default, when we use styles in the highlighter-pens palette, Logos creates a notes document called Highlighter Pens.

  • Open the notes document by choosing the documents menu
  • Click the Highlighter Pens file to open it
  • Select Quotes as the view in which to display the notes (E)
  • Notice the names of the resources in which text was highlighted (F)
  • Click the arrow to the left of a resource to reveal all of the text that was highlighted in that specific resource (G)

morris-proctor-see-and-read-only-highlighted-text-3

As you can see, by utilizing the highlighting and quotes views, you can in essence produce a personal summary, comprising what you deem important of any resource in your library.

You can learn more about Logos 6 features in the Logos 6: What’s New? Manual and the Logos 6: What’s New? Video, now available on Pre-Pub.

Also be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including the January events in Tampa and Houston.

Our Long-Awaited Jesus

Luke 2:11

When I meditate on Christmas, I think about our Jesus—about the miracle of our Savior. About being free from my sins and being able to rest in his grace all because he came here to save us. But I don’t often think about the fact that people longed and waited for him to come.

Patience isn’t something that comes naturally for most people, especially when there’s no ETA. And waiting for Jesus had to require more patience than anything else we’ve ever waited for.

They knew he had been promised. They believed he would come. But they didn’t know when. I can’t even imagine how amazing it felt for those shepherds, who were just going about their day, to hear those glorious words:

“For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.” (Luke 2:11)

The Lord was here. Our Jesus had come. They would be set free. The Savior born was declared to be the divine Messiah, and an angel had been sent to tell them personally.

After all that waiting, he had finally arrived.

The hymn Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus puts this into perspective:

Come, thou long expected Jesus,
born to set thy people free;
from our fears and sins release us,
let us find our rest in thee.
Israel’s strength and consolation,
hope of all the earth thou art;
dear desire of every nation,
joy of every longing heart.

Born thy people to deliver,
born a child and yet a King,
born to reign in us forever,
now thy gracious kingdom bring.
By thine own eternal spirit
rule in all our hearts alone;
by thine all sufficient merit,
raise us to thy glorious throne.

He was the desire of every nation, the longing of every heart. Jesus, the best king they could ever hope for—their strength, hope, and joy. People didn’t care about gifts, or great food, or even good company. Their long-awaited Savior had suddenly come, and that’s all that mattered.

This Christmas, let’s remember what a miracle Jesus was. Let’s not take his birth for granted. Let us drop everything and bask in the glory of our long-awaited Savior, who was born on earth, would die to save us, and who will never leave us.

For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.

—John 3:16

Hallelujah, our Savior is here! Let us rejoice.

God with Us: The Birth of a Savior

Matthew 1:23One of the most fascinating developments to follow through the Bible’s storyline is the concept of God dwelling with his people. God, the creator of all that exists, gradually reveals his desire to be present and active with those who belong to him. Tracing this progressive revelation is cause for great worship and wondrous hope.

After God rescued the Israelites from Egypt, God commanded them to make him “a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst” (Exod. 25:8). God had given the Israelites new hope and identity by rescuing them from the Egyptians. Now, he revealed his intention to have his presence continually with them. Through both this “tabernacle” and the temple that followed, God lived among his people. How incredible it must have felt to have the Lord of all creation make his home with them!

Yet the tabernacle and temple were only a glimpse of God’s ultimate plan to draw near to his people. Isaiah prophesied about a coming “Emmanuel” (Isa. 7:14), a name which means “God with us.” In Jesus, God entered into his creation in a very tangible way. That the temple system allowed for the high priest to enter into God’s presence was astounding, but Jesus made God’s presence readily available to all. He did this in two ways.

First, Jesus revealed the character of God. He demonstrated the love, mercy, righteousness, and holiness of God in ways that we could easily see and understand. Following God was no longer merely about obeying commands, but about following the one who lived them out perfectly.

Second, Jesus made a way for sinners to come into God’s presence by providing a “once and for all,” perfect sacrifice for sin. The writer of Hebrews tells us that Christians “have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus” (Heb. 10:19). Through Jesus’ death and resurrection, God both dwelt with us and provided a way for us to dwell with him.

With the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, we get another example of God’s desire to dwell with his people. Through the Holy Spirit, God intends to be ever present and active with his people, both as individuals and as the church (1 Cor. 6:19, 1 Cor. 3:16). In words only fully grasped with an understanding of the Israelite temple system, Paul asks the Corinthian church, “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you?” Just as God’s presence dwelt in the inner sanctuary of the physical temple, so now his presence dwells with his church and with individual believers.

Yet the final piece in God’s plan to dwell with his people is still yet to come. In John’s vision of the new creation, he sees “the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God” (Rev. 21:2). John then hears “a loud voice from the throne saying, ‘Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God’” (Rev. 21:3). As we’ve seen time and again, God enters into our world, moves into our neighborhood. This passage does not read, “. . . the dwelling place of man is with God,” but rather “. . . the dwelling place of God is with man.” God enters into our world, our realm, our lives. He is the great initiator. And apart from his continual movement towards us, we are hopeless.

What a joy that our hope is not in “us with God,” but in “God with us.” Emmanuel.

* * *

Continue exploring the Christmas story with limited-time Christmas collections, and find ways to enrich your holiday season with Scripture during the Logos Christmas sale.

A Chorus of Angels with Joy in Their Hearts

Luke 2:14
It’s easy to imagine what Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, or the Magi were thinking and feeling when they encountered the baby Jesus for the first time. I can imagine the mix of excitement, nerves, and expectation as they wondered when God would reveal the details of his plan and what kind of man this child would grow to be.

But have you ever thought what the angels of Luke 2 were thinking and feeling? I hadn’t until I read Rev. C.H. Spurgeon’s sermon on Luke 2:14 titled “The First Christmas Carol.”

Luke 2:14 records what the angels sang about the birth of Christ, overlooking a hillside full of sheep and shepherds. Spurgeon pointed out that, compared with the breadth of their experiences, this was a fairly humble job for a chorus of angels. These angels sang the soundtrack of creation, looking on as God spun into being all that we know. Several among their number had carried messages to kings and emperors. But on that night they carried a birth announcement to salt-of-the-earth people. And yet they didn’t hold back an ounce. They gave their highest praise. And Spurgeon said, “Methinks, they sang it with gladness in their eye; with their hearts burning with love, and with breasts as full of joy as if the good news to man had been good news to themselves.”

Why were the usually somber angels so delighted on that night? Because in the person of Jesus, all of God’s promises were fulfilled. All the attributes of God were manifest in a form that all men and women could see and experience for themselves. In the baby Jesus, God made himself accessible to us.

To the refrain they add, “. . . and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!” Not since the garden had true peace with God been available to mankind. Since Adam’s sin, there had always been enmity between God and men. The sacrificial system carved out an unsteady ceasefire, but lasting peace was finally possible on the night that God closed the distance between heaven and earth. He came to us because we could not go to him.

So as you celebrate Christmas this year, carve out some time to celebrate like the angels did—by giving to God the highest praise of which you are capable, and reveling in the peace that he made possible for you and me.

* * *

You can continue exploring Luke’s Gospel with this season’s exclusive Luke Christmas Collection, or save on other resources this Christmas that help you dig into God’s Word.

New Lexham Press Titles Shipping Soon

Lexham Press has 16 new books shipping before the calendar turns over to 2015! All of these books are on currently on Pre-Pub—by ordering now, you could get up to 40% off the regular price.

Hurry—all of these books will ship before the end of the year!

Spurgeon Commentary Collection

spurgeon-commentary-collection-new-testament-lettersWe’ve already shown you what makes these commentaries different—they’re more than just a collection of Spurgeon’s writings and spoken word. They’re directly connected to your Logos Bible Software tools that you use on a regular basis, filled with the inspiring wisdom of one of the most influential preachers of the modern era.

The revolutionary Spurgeon Commentary Collection ships December 30. Get it for 40% off on Pre-Pub.

Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics

reformed-dogmaticsFor the first time ever, Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics will be available in English. The first two volumes have been completed and the third one is almost ready. We’re shipping all three of these volumes—Theology Proper, Anthropology, and Christology—now so you can benefit from this groundbreaking translation project.

The final two volumes are scheduled to be finished by July, 2016. If you order now, you’ll receive the first three volumes when they ship December 29 and the other two volumes automatically as they’re finished.

You can get this important piece of Reformed theology for 20% off on Pre-Pub.

Transformative Word series

when-you-want-to-yell-at-god-the-book-of-jobThe first two volumes of the Transformative Word series are finished and ready to ship.

The first volume, When You Want to Yell at God, helps us see the book of Job with fresh eyes. Looking at Job as the height of biblical poetry, Craig Bartholomew helps us see just how beautiful this man’s struggle with God really is.

The second volume, Cutting Ties with Darkness, examines the painful relationship between the Apostle Paul and the church in Corinth. How can we deal with the scars we’ve picked up from our own relationships in light of Jesus’ example?

The Transformative Word series is written by a global cast of church leaders to help you reflect on how the Bible can transform your life. A conversational tone and thought-provoking questions guide you through each biblical book.

These two volumes will ship December 30. Get them both for 20% off on Pre-Pub.

Stand-alone books

the-lion-of-princeton-bb-warfield-as-apologist-and-theologianLexham Press has two additional stand-alone books that will ship before the end of the year, The Lion of Princeton: B.B. Warfield as Apologist and Theologian and Confronted by Grace: Meditations of a Theologian.

In the Lion of Princeton, Kim Riddlebarger examines B.B. Warfield’s theological, apologetical, and polemical writings, bringing clarity to the confusion that surrounds one of the most significant American theologians. Riddlebarger provides a biographical overview of Warfield’s life and traces the growing appreciation for Warfield’s thought by contemporary Reformed thinkers.

Confronted by Grace is a collection of beautifully and thoughtfully written sermons from John Webster, a leading contemporary theologian. These reflections, born from years of theological and biblical study, demonstrate the complexity of the realities we face in the Christian life and the depth of the grace of God. Thoroughly accessible, Webster points us toward Christ so that we may grow in our understanding of the truth of the gospel.

These two books ship on December 31. Get them both for 20% off on Pre-Pub.

Jesus: Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace

Isaiah 9:6

Isaiah’s magnificent prophecy spans not only history, going from creation (e.g., 42:5) to eternity (e.g., 9:7), but also geography, with an interest ranging between God’s own people through all of humanity (e.v., 2:2). Containing both words of hope and horror, its key theme is God himself, who is referred to hundreds of times.”

Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary on the Old Testament

In the first chapter of Isaiah, God expresses his dissatisfaction with the sacrifices Israel offered (Isaiah 1:11–16). On the outside, they are doing exactly as God asked: they sacrifice rams and bulls, fat and blood, lambs, goats, and incense. They honor the Sabbath. They have a system for remembering when to feast and celebrate what God has done (Isaiah 1:14).

But God says their sacrifices are meaningless. “I have had enough . . . I do not delight . . . bring no more.” Quantity is not the issue. Quality is. And it’s not a matter of extravagance. Their elaborate prayers use their lips and their hands (Isaiah 1:15) and look great on the outside (Matthew 6:5), but there is no heart behind them.

Other religions made sacrifices to their gods because they believed they were feeding them. The Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary says, “Popular Israelite religion frequently forgot that God was not actually fed through sacrifice and sought to manipulate him through such offerings.” They forgot why they were making sacrifices—they thought they had to feed the God who created the world. But God wasn’t dependent on the Israelites and their sacrifices. They were dependent on him.

The Faithlife Study Bible says, “An increase in offerings is meaningless without a change in attitudes. The sacrifice fundamentally represented Israel’s relationship with Yahweh, by which Israelites acknowledge dependence on Him. There was no point in going through the motions if they’d abandoned that dependence—either through idolatry or pride in their self-sufficiency.”

The sacrifices were meant to be an external symbol of an internal process: repentance (Isaiah 1:16–20). The FSB says “God calls for inward repentance after condemning the empty efforts of outward observance.” They were cleaning the outside of the cup, while filth festered on the inside (Luke 11:39).

The system God established for dealing with sins had been abused for too long. The death of innocent animals was not enough for guilty humans to see the error of their ways (Hebrews 10:4). The status quo wasn’t working. Isaiah called for change in the present, and pointed to a bigger change in the future (Hebrews 10:10).

Isaiah 9:6 introduces Israel to powerful names for a son who was yet to come. Wonderful Counselor. Mighty God. Everlasting Father. Prince of Peace.

The people of Israel didn’t crack open their New Testaments to John 3:16 and say, “Hey, that’s Jesus!” They looked to the current line of David for an immediate answer—someone who could live up to these prophetic titles. The Faithlife Study Bible reminds us that “the prediction of a future ideal Davidic ruler point ultimately to the Messiah, but immediate hopes for Judah’s future would have been directed at the Davidic line, continued through Hezekiah.”

But there was a problem. Some of these titles could only be attributed to God. No man could measure up to names like “Mighty God”—that’s blasphemy (John 8:58–59). As he so often does, God had a different plan than man.

People can’t overcome sin by their own power. The sacrifices which were once acceptable to God had become useless buckets on a sinking ship. God needed to intervene, or the world would drown in sin.

No matter how mighty God made a man, that man could never save Israel from sin—he himself would be corrupted by it (Romans 3:23). The names of this future son were only fit for God because God was the only one who could solve the problem.

They needed a Wonderful Counselor: someone who could give them the wisdom they needed to truly repent (James 1:5, Hebrews 2:18).

They had a Mighty God, but they needed a personal relationship with him (John 1:10–13, Colossians 1:15–16).

With Abraham, they were entitled to an earthly inheritance, but through their Everlasting Father, they had an eternal one to aspire to (Hebrews 9:15, Romans 8:16–17).

And to abolish the old sacrificial system which put a bandage on their sin, they needed the Prince of Peace to restore them (Ephesians 2:13–18, Philippians 4:6–7).

The Christmas season is a time to celebrate the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy: “For to us, a child is born, to us, a son is given.” Remember where that son came from (John 3:16), and glorify God for providing the sacrifice to end all sacrifices.

* * *

Take some time to reflect on God’s Word this Christmas season: check out the resources available in our Christmas sale.