New Lexham Press Titles Shipping Soon

Lexham Press has 16 new books shipping before the calendar turns over to 2015! All of these books are on currently on Pre-Pub—by ordering now, you could get up to 40% off the regular price.

Hurry—all of these books will ship before the end of the year!

Spurgeon Commentary Collection

spurgeon-commentary-collection-new-testament-lettersWe’ve already shown you what makes these commentaries different—they’re more than just a collection of Spurgeon’s writings and spoken word. They’re directly connected to your Logos Bible Software tools that you use on a regular basis, filled with the inspiring wisdom of one of the most influential preachers of the modern era.

The revolutionary Spurgeon Commentary Collection ships December 30. Get it for 40% off on Pre-Pub.

Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics

reformed-dogmaticsFor the first time ever, Geerhardus Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics will be available in English. The first two volumes have been completed and the third one is almost ready. We’re shipping all three of these volumes—Theology Proper, Anthropology, and Christology—now so you can benefit from this groundbreaking translation project.

The final two volumes are scheduled to be finished by July, 2016. If you order now, you’ll receive the first three volumes when they ship December 29 and the other two volumes automatically as they’re finished.

You can get this important piece of Reformed theology for 20% off on Pre-Pub.

Transformative Word series

when-you-want-to-yell-at-god-the-book-of-jobThe first two volumes of the Transformative Word series are finished and ready to ship.

The first volume, When You Want to Yell at God, helps us see the book of Job with fresh eyes. Looking at Job as the height of biblical poetry, Craig Bartholomew helps us see just how beautiful this man’s struggle with God really is.

The second volume, Cutting Ties with Darkness, examines the painful relationship between the Apostle Paul and the church in Corinth. How can we deal with the scars we’ve picked up from our own relationships in light of Jesus’ example?

The Transformative Word series is written by a global cast of church leaders to help you reflect on how the Bible can transform your life. A conversational tone and thought-provoking questions guide you through each biblical book.

These two volumes will ship December 30. Get them both for 20% off on Pre-Pub.

Stand-alone books

the-lion-of-princeton-bb-warfield-as-apologist-and-theologianLexham Press has two additional stand-alone books that will ship before the end of the year, The Lion of Princeton: B.B. Warfield as Apologist and Theologian and Confronted by Grace: Meditations of a Theologian.

In the Lion of Princeton, Kim Riddlebarger examines B.B. Warfield’s theological, apologetical, and polemical writings, bringing clarity to the confusion that surrounds one of the most significant American theologians. Riddlebarger provides a biographical overview of Warfield’s life and traces the growing appreciation for Warfield’s thought by contemporary Reformed thinkers.

Confronted by Grace is a collection of beautifully and thoughtfully written sermons from John Webster, a leading contemporary theologian. These reflections, born from years of theological and biblical study, demonstrate the complexity of the realities we face in the Christian life and the depth of the grace of God. Thoroughly accessible, Webster points us toward Christ so that we may grow in our understanding of the truth of the gospel.

These two books ship on December 31. Get them both for 20% off on Pre-Pub.

Jesus: Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace

Isaiah 9:6

Isaiah’s magnificent prophecy spans not only history, going from creation (e.g., 42:5) to eternity (e.g., 9:7), but also geography, with an interest ranging between God’s own people through all of humanity (e.v., 2:2). Containing both words of hope and horror, its key theme is God himself, who is referred to hundreds of times.”

Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary on the Old Testament

In the first chapter of Isaiah, God expresses his dissatisfaction with the sacrifices Israel offered (Isaiah 1:11–16). On the outside, they are doing exactly as God asked: they sacrifice rams and bulls, fat and blood, lambs, goats, and incense. They honor the Sabbath. They have a system for remembering when to feast and celebrate what God has done (Isaiah 1:14).

But God says their sacrifices are meaningless. “I have had enough . . . I do not delight . . . bring no more.” Quantity is not the issue. Quality is. And it’s not a matter of extravagance. Their elaborate prayers use their lips and their hands (Isaiah 1:15) and look great on the outside (Matthew 6:5), but there is no heart behind them.

Other religions made sacrifices to their gods because they believed they were feeding them. The Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary says, “Popular Israelite religion frequently forgot that God was not actually fed through sacrifice and sought to manipulate him through such offerings.” They forgot why they were making sacrifices—they thought they had to feed the God who created the world. But God wasn’t dependent on the Israelites and their sacrifices. They were dependent on him.

The Faithlife Study Bible says, “An increase in offerings is meaningless without a change in attitudes. The sacrifice fundamentally represented Israel’s relationship with Yahweh, by which Israelites acknowledge dependence on Him. There was no point in going through the motions if they’d abandoned that dependence—either through idolatry or pride in their self-sufficiency.”

The sacrifices were meant to be an external symbol of an internal process: repentance (Isaiah 1:16–20). The FSB says “God calls for inward repentance after condemning the empty efforts of outward observance.” They were cleaning the outside of the cup, while filth festered on the inside (Luke 11:39).

The system God established for dealing with sins had been abused for too long. The death of innocent animals was not enough for guilty humans to see the error of their ways (Hebrews 10:4). The status quo wasn’t working. Isaiah called for change in the present, and pointed to a bigger change in the future (Hebrews 10:10).

Isaiah 9:6 introduces Israel to powerful names for a son who was yet to come. Wonderful Counselor. Mighty God. Everlasting Father. Prince of Peace.

The people of Israel didn’t crack open their New Testaments to John 3:16 and say, “Hey, that’s Jesus!” They looked to the current line of David for an immediate answer—someone who could live up to these prophetic titles. The Faithlife Study Bible reminds us that “the prediction of a future ideal Davidic ruler point ultimately to the Messiah, but immediate hopes for Judah’s future would have been directed at the Davidic line, continued through Hezekiah.”

But there was a problem. Some of these titles could only be attributed to God. No man could measure up to names like “Mighty God”—that’s blasphemy (John 8:58–59). As he so often does, God had a different plan than man.

People can’t overcome sin by their own power. The sacrifices which were once acceptable to God had become useless buckets on a sinking ship. God needed to intervene, or the world would drown in sin.

No matter how mighty God made a man, that man could never save Israel from sin—he himself would be corrupted by it (Romans 3:23). The names of this future son were only fit for God because God was the only one who could solve the problem.

They needed a Wonderful Counselor: someone who could give them the wisdom they needed to truly repent (James 1:5, Hebrews 2:18).

They had a Mighty God, but they needed a personal relationship with him (John 1:10–13, Colossians 1:15–16).

With Abraham, they were entitled to an earthly inheritance, but through their Everlasting Father, they had an eternal one to aspire to (Hebrews 9:15, Romans 8:16–17).

And to abolish the old sacrificial system which put a bandage on their sin, they needed the Prince of Peace to restore them (Ephesians 2:13–18, Philippians 4:6–7).

The Christmas season is a time to celebrate the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy: “For to us, a child is born, to us, a son is given.” Remember where that son came from (John 3:16), and glorify God for providing the sacrifice to end all sacrifices.

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Take some time to reflect on God’s Word this Christmas season: check out the resources available in our Christmas sale.

Logos 6: Tag Your Own Resources

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

The Logos team has tagged the words of Scripture referring to people, places, and things. This referent dataset then allows us to locate every mention of a specific person, place, or thing regardless of the words used to reference them. For example, we can locate all the places in the Bible Timothy is mentioned, whether he’s referred to by name, with a pronoun, or though a term like disciple or man.

We have thousands of other words in books, though, which reference people, places, and things. These words, however, are not tagged. The best we can do is search for entities by name like Paul, Corinth, or shield. That is until now!

Through the power of a new Logos 6 tool called Community Tags, users can tag words in resources according to the people, places, and things they reference.

For example:

  • Open the resource Alone with God to page 56 (A)
  • Select (highlight) the phrase his name in the first paragraph (B)

morris-proctor-tag-your-own-resources-1

  • Right click the selection (C)
  • Select his name from the context menu (D)
  • Select Add community tag (E)

morris-proctor-tag-your-own-resources-2

  • Type David in the Add community tag box that appears (F)
  • Select the person David from the drop-down list (G)

morris-proctor-tag-your-own-resources-3

  • Notice that underneath his name, Logos places a dotted gray line representing a community tag (H)
  • Rest the cursor on the line to see a rich preview of David (I)

morris-proctor-tag-your-own-resources-4

Logos will also synchronize this tag to the accounts of other Logos users so they’ll benefit from your tagging.

So what’s the benefit of Community Tags? The ability to search them!

Try this:

  • Right click the tagged text his name (J)
  • Select David Person from the context menu (K)
  • Select Search community tags (L)

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Notice in the search results, all the resources with community tags referencing David, including Alone with God (K)! We’re now locating people, places, and things in our books—not just our Bibles.

morris-proctor-tag-your-own-resources-6

You can learn more about Community Tags in the Logos 6: What’s New? Manual.

Also, be sure to register for our in-depth Camp Logos in Tampa and Houston.

Last Chance: 4 Mobile Ed Courses Shipping This Month

Mobile Ed has had a busy year. We have close to 50 courses available right now with even more in post-production! In addition, four courses are about to ship, which means this is your last chance to save 40% on each of them.

Here’s a brief look at what you’ll get in these courses:

Western Civilization: Greeks to Aquinas

mobile-ed-cs201-western-civilization-greeks-to-aquinasIn CS201 Western Civilization: Greeks to Aquinas, Dr. Bryan Litfin surveys overs 1,200 years of Western civilization with an emphasis on the rise of Christianity. He describes the background of the early church, the rise and fall of the Roman Empire, the birth of Europe, the Middle Ages, and the Crusades. Throughout the course, Dr. Litfin focuses on factors that influenced the growth and development of Christianity, including the councils of the early church, key figures like Augustine, early Christian monasticism, the rise of the papacy, and the early missionary efforts of the church.

This course will give you a better appreciation of how Christianity influenced Western culture, as well as how Western culture influenced Christianity. This course ships on December 23, so order it today while it’s still 40% off!

Introducing Pastoral Counseling I and II

mobile-ed-eric-l-johnson-pastoral-counseling-bundleIn this two-course Pastoral Counseling Bundle, psychologist and professor of pastoral care Dr. Eric L. Johnson provides an overview of pastoral counseling.

In CO101 Introducing Pastoral Counseling I: Theory and Practice, he lays out seven foundational themes or pillars of pastoral counseling. He also describes practical counseling skills that you can use to develop your own counseling abilities and outlines a five-session model for pastoral counseling.

In CO102 Introducing Pastoral Counseling II: Examples in Application, Dr. Johnson looks more in depth at psychological issues every counselor should be aware of. He provides different approaches and strategies you can take when counseling people with depression, couples having problems in their marriage, individuals going through a crisis, and more. Dr. Johnson also discusses important considerations such as when to refer people to professionals for longer-term care.

These two courses are invaluable to anyone who is involved in pastoral counseling. They ship on December 26, so order them today while you can get them for 40% off!

Introducing Evangelism

mobile-ed-ed121-introducing-evangelismFinally, in ED121 Introducing Evangelism, author, pastor, and apologist Dr. Bobby Conway walks you through the basics of evangelism. He explains why evangelism is important and why all believers should be evangelists. He offers a practical strategy to help you get started—a strategy that includes principles like “rely on God through prayer” and “equip yourself to defend the faith.” Dr. Conway emphasizes the importance of building relationships with people, sharing your own personal story, and connecting new believers to a local church.

This course will encourage you to share your faith and provide you with the tools necessary to do so. It ships December 30, so order it today and get 40% off!

Pre-order these courses today to lock in the best prices!

How to Incorporate Extrabiblical Texts into Your Exegesis

ancient-literature-example-featureGood exegesis starts with the text. But it doesn’t end there. You rightly examine lexicons, commentaries, and all sorts of other references as you wrestle with a text.

But what did the ancients say about the text you’re wrestling with? How was this verse used or understood by the Rabbis? By the Church Fathers? What about Philo and Josephus? Are there topics or ideas in this verse that were used in other ancient literature?

Standard secondary sources such as these have been available for Logos Bible Software for a while. But there are a lot of them (no, really, see the list at the end of this post!). And you have to know how to search, then you have to be able to evaluate the usages. And that doesn’t even take into account when commentaries refer to ancient literature (which happens frequently).

In Logos 6, it is as simple as looking in the Passage Guide report you probably already ran on the verse. The Passage Guide sports a brand-new section called Ancient Literature. The section provides information on how your passage is used in all sorts of ancient literature. Not only that, but it also classifies the relationship of the reference in ancient literature with the biblical reference you’re examining. It uses simple and general categories like citation, quotation, allusion, echo, topical, lexical, phrase, and historical.

An example—the one that actually prompted us to start assembling the extensive underlying dataset used by this tool—will probably help explain.

Isaiah 54: The Barren Woman

Here’s the text of Isaiah 54:1 from the Lexham English Bible (LEB):

“Sing for joy, barren woman; who has not borne!

Burst forth into rejoicing and rejoice, she who has not been in labor!

For the children of the desolate woman are more than the children of the married woman,” says Yahweh.

Why would a barren woman rejoice? Once you’ve done your initial work within the passage and within the canonical text, it might help to look at how the passage is understood and referred to in other ancient literature, and whether its relation is intertextual or topical in nature. Understanding how ancient literature interacts at either an intertextual or topical level with this passage can give us better insight into how the cultures contemporary with the Bible viewed barren women, their role in society, and why it would be strange for them to be rejoicing.

This is exactly what the Ancient Literature tool gives you. It points you to relevant portions of ancient literature, classifying the relationship so you can determine if the reference is something you’d like to examine further:

ancient-literature-example
Ancient Near Eastern literature

Literature in this category does not directly interact with the text of the Bible, but it is from the same milieu and can give us insight into how cultures contemporary with ancient Israel viewed similar concepts and topics.

One document, known as “Enki and Ninmah” (Context of Scripture 1.159) uses the concept of a barren woman. It also shows the cultural notion that a woman unable to give birth was deemed as somehow defective (the larger context of COS 1.159 is a contest between Enki and Ninmah, where Ninmah is creating defective humans and challenging Enki to somehow redeem them or make them useful):

Fifth—she fashioned from it a woman

who could not give birth.

Enki—upon seeing the woman

who could not give birth,

Decreed her fate, he assigned her

to do work in the Women’s Quarter.1

Here, all that Enki could do with the barren woman was to give her work in the women’s quarter. Understanding the cultural necessity of the ability to procreate and the following derision heaped upon those unable to do so is important for understanding the craziness of commanding Isaiah 54:1’s barren woman to rejoice. She has nothing to rejoice over and is well aware of it.

Apostolic Fathers

In Second Clement, one of the earliest available Christian sermons outside of the New Testament, typically dated AD 100–150, the homilist begins (§2.1–3) by quoting from Isaiah 54 and then explaining what he thinks it means. If you’re looking at Isaiah 54, this is good stuff:

2.1Rejoice, O barren woman who has not given birth, break forth and shout, you who has no birth pains, for many are the children of the deserted woman, more than she who has a husband.  The one who says, “Rejoice, O barren woman who has not given birth,” speaks to us, for our church was barren before children were given to her. 2 And the one who says “Shout you who has no birth pains,” means this: offer up our prayers sincerely to God, we should not grow weary like women in labor.  3 And the one who says, “For many are the children of the deserted woman, more than she who has a husband,” since our people seem to be deserted by God, but now we who have believed have become many more than those who seemed to have God.2

In Second Clement, the barren woman is identified as the church, and the growth of the church is identified as the children of the barren woman—pretty interesting.

Judiaca

In the Babylonian Talmud, b.Ber. I.8 mentions Isaiah 54:1. Beruriah is the wife of Rabbi Meir; here she is fielding a question about barren women, specifically referencing Isaiah 54:1:

I.8 A. A certain min said to Beruriah, “It is written, ‘Sing, O barren woman, who has not born . . .’ (Is. 54:1).

B.“Because the woman is barren, should she rejoice?”

      1. She said to him, “Idiot, look at the end of the same verse of Scripture, for it is written, ‘For the children of the desolate shall be more than the children of the married woman, says the Lord’ (Is. 54:1).
      2. “What then is the sense of, ‘Barren woman, who has not born’?

E.“Rejoice, O congregation of Israel, which is like a barren woman [that is,] who has not born children destined for Gehenna such as yourself.”3

Beruriah’s scorn for the lazy exegesis of the Isaiah passage by the one consulting her is evident in her response in ‘B’, labeling him an idiot for not reading the rest of the verse, and then in ‘E’ by her declaration that he is destined for Gehenna as well.

Other references

And there is so much more. Philo, On Rewards §§158–161 cites Isaiah 54:1 and then provides an allegorical interpretation of it. The Sectarian Dead Sea Scrolls (4Q265 Fragment 2) allude to it so we know the passage was used among the Qumran community. There are references in the Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (2 Baruch 10.14; Apocalypse of Elijah 2.38; and more). There are several references in the writings of the Church Fathers.

Get started with Ancient Literature

In the past, users with all of these resources may not have found these references unless they were serious power users with serious search skills. Even then, the references would not have been classified.

Ancient Literature gives you an entry point into all sorts of ancient writings related to the Bible in one way or another. And it provides you with information relevant to the section of Scripture you are studying. It helps you to see how the ancients—rightly or wrongly—used the passage you’re studying. And that could be just the piece you need to better understand your text.

Literature areas and resources for exploration

As you study with the Ancient Literature tool, you can pull from several different resource categories in your library, including:

* * *

Check out Ancient Literature in action and see how to use this tool step by step.

Logos 6’s Ancient Literature tool is available in Silver and higher: explore all of your base-package options, or see which package we recommend for you.

  1. William W. Hallo and K. Lawson Younger, The Context of Scripture (Leiden: Brill, 1997–), 518. []
  2. Rick Brannan, trans., The Apostolic Fathers in English (Logos Bible Software, 2012). []
  3. Jacob Neusner, The Babylonian Talmud: A Translation and Commentary (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2011), 56–57. []

Shipping Soon: The John MacArthur Sermon Archive

john-macarthur-sermon-archiveJohn MacArthur is one of the most influential pastors of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Known for his adherence to Scripture as the inerrant Word of God, MacArthur used his preaching ministry to touch the lives of millions throughout the globe. Now, with the John MacArthur Sermon Archive, you can integrate his vast sermon collection into your Logos library and take advantage of powerful search capabilities and features you’ve come to love.

After this product ships on December 30, the price will double, so place your pre-order now to lock in your price!

Sermons that span decades

MacArthur has preached on a variety of topics throughout his pastoral ministry, including:

  • The doctrine of God’s effectual call
  • The responsibilities of the church
  • Fundamental Christian attitudes
  • The spiritual significance of the Resurrection
  • Bible questions and answers
  • The coming earthly kingdom of the Lord Jesus Christ
  • Survival strategy for apostate times

With Logos 6, you can incorporate MacArthur’s sermons into your Passage Guide searches. For instance, when you search for a text in John, all relevant sermons from the John MacArthur Sermon Archive will appear in your search results, giving you an inside look at MacArthur’s teaching on any given passage.

See how you can incorporate sermon archives into your study with Logos:

Get on board before it ships

The John MacArthur Sermon Archive is one of our most requested items, and we’re proud to announce that it will ship December 30. However, once it ships, the price of this resource will double. Take advantage of this offer now and begin enjoying John MacArthur’s sermons as soon as they ship.

Don’t wait—pre-order the John MacArthur Sermon Archive by December 30 to lock in the best price!

Now Available: Bible Study Magazine Book Bundle

bible-study-magazine-book-bundleSince 2008, Bible Study Magazine has been shipping issues every two months, and we just shipped our 38th issue. And now, Lexham Press is proud to announce a nine-volume collection of Bible Study Magazine books, available today!

There are over 200 articles from Bible Study Magazine‘s 38 issues contained in these nine books—that’s over 35 percent of the archive. If you account for the other four Bible Study Magazine books that we’ve published separately (which can be found in the Lexham Bible Study Essentials Bundle), we’ve digitized almost 350 articles—over 60 percent of the archive.

We’ve organized the articles into books with other similar content. If you want to read a book on church growth, we have a volume that includes interviews from 12 influential church leaders. Interested in how the gospel is being spread around the world? We’ve compiled a book of amazing interviews with missionaries from all corners of the map.

We’ve also enhanced these books to take advantage of the many amazing features found in Logos Bible Software. Now, you’ll be able to search for your favorite interview from Bible Study Magazine, and these resources will be connected to many of the powerful tools you use in Logos.

Be inspired

The Bible Study Magazine Book Bundle is packed full of amazing content from the magazine’s first seven years. We’ve interviewed influential Christian leaders, pastors, and theologians to see how the Bible has inspired and transformed their lives. Here’s a look at these inspiring stories:

  • Speak the Word: 12 Christian Leaders on Communicating the Truth: Learn from influential Christian leaders, including Beth Moore, John MacArthur, Randy Alcorn, and many more! You’ll read about God’s faithfulness in all circumstances and the lessons learned by these leaders as they share our Christian faith.
  • Spread the Word: 12 Christian Leaders on Church Growth: Get advice from Christian leaders, including Francis Chan, David Platt, Paul David Tripp, and many more! These stories speak to our role in advancing God’s kingdom on earth and how you can take part in spreading the gospel around the world.
  • Study the Word: 12 Christian Leaders on Bible Study: Learn how influential pastors and Christian leaders approach Bible study, including Kay Arthur, Max Lucado, Philip Yancey, and many more! Be inspired with a newfound passion for Bible study as you are transformed by the power of Scripture in your life.
  • The Gospel Work Everywhere: 14 Inspiring Stories from Around the World: Be inspired by missionaries from around the world who are sharing the gospel in their specific cultural contexts. This simple message holds true for every nation on earth and continues to change lives in every circumstance.
  • The Bible in the Real World: 31 Inspiring Interviews: Learn from the perspectives of people from all walks of life—ministry leaders, artists, writers, entertainers, scholars, and more. These stories show us that God’s truth speaks to us right where we are.

Get it today

If you’re a current Bible Study Magazine subscriber and are interested in getting this bundle, please call us at 888-875-9491 to get a special discount!

The Bible Study Magazine Book Bundle is available right now: get these inspiring stories from Bible Study Magazine just in time for Christmas!

Logos 6 Review: Dr. Mark Futato

Mark-Futato-BWToday’s guest post is from Dr. Mark Futato. Dr. Futato currently serves as the Robert L. Maclellian Professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. He is an avid Logos user and creatively integrates the software into core courses on Hebrew and Old Testament books.

With the release of Logos 6, students of the Hebrew Bible have a wonderful tool at their fingertips, regardless of the level at which they are engaged in the study of the text. In addition to all of the strengths of previous versions of Logos, Logos 6 has new or enhanced features that students of the Hebrew Bible will appreciate.

For those just learning Hebrew, there are nice tools like the Hebrew Alphabet Tutor, which facilitates mastering the signs and sounds of the Hebrew alphabet, and the Morphology Charts, which help students not only understand forms, but also quickly find all of the places where given forms are found in the Hebrew text. Then there is the Text Converter, which allows one to easily embed transliterated text into a document in compliance with any of a number of different style sheets. The Factbook is a great tool for quickly gathering a lot of data for various kinds of topical studies.

On a somewhat more advanced level are the Bible Sense Lexicon and Clause Search tools. The strengths of the Bible Sense Lexicon are too many to enumerate here, but two call for comment.

One, since words do not “mean” in isolation but in collocation with other words, the Bible Sense Lexicon is an excellent tool for students as it allows them to quickly find word collocations—for example, a particular verb when used with a particular subject or object. It is now easy for students to find all the places where the Hebrew verb for “create” with “God” as the subject is used with a variety of objects to easily ascertain that “create” does not in and of itself mean “create out of nothing.”

Two, related to this is the ability to find with one search all the places where “God” is the subject of the verb “create,” whether that subject is ʾĕlōhîm, yhwh, or a pronoun that refers to the God of Israel.

l6-overview-gold-featuredThe Clause Search tool can produce similar results, only with a higher level of sophistication. It is now easy for students to find all the places where the Hebrew verb for “lift” is used with “soul” as the direct object to easily ascertain that this expression in Psalm 24:4 means “to trust.”

Ample templates are provided, so students can do searches with just a few clicks. In addition, the templates are only a starting point. Once students understand the logic of the templates, they can then mix and match elements from the templates to create their own searches. Given the syntactically tagged database that underlies clause searching, the only limit on syntactical searches is the imagination of the student.

There are also numerous new resources available in Logos 6. One of my favorites is Biblia Hebraica Quinta for Deuteronomy, Ruth, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Lamentations, Esther, Ezra, and Nehemiah. Along with the Hebrew text comes the critical apparatus with hyperlinks for all of the sigla, which allow students to easily understand the apparatus. Other fine tools are the Proverbs Explorer and Psalms Explorer, which are no doubt the first of tools on all of the books of the Hebrew Bible. The Psalms Explorer allows quick access to analyzing Psalms in terms of genre, attribution, or key theological themes.

More could be said, but I hope I have said enough to whet your appetite for studying the Hebrew Bible with Logos 6. For me, “efficient” and “pleasurable” are adjectives that describe the study of the Hebrew Bible with Logos 6.

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Study with the same tools Dr. Futato applauds: get Logos 6 today!

3 Ways Logos 6 Helps You Grow

From experienced scholar to new student, Logos 6 makes biblical insights accessible to everyone.

Here are three ways Logos 6 helps you grow in your Bible study:

1. Do scholarly study (without formal training)

logos-6-reviews-familyFor those who haven’t attended seminary or don’t have church-leadership experience, tasks like primary-source research, Greek and Hebrew study, and textual variants typically feel a little out of our reach. Without formal training or proper resources, how do you know where to start or which resources to trust?

Logos 6 offers the tools and resources you need to overcome these obstacles and explore the Word in new, fulfilling ways. Logos 6 makes connections for you, so you spend less time trying to find your footing and more time digging into Scripture.

Just run a search in your Passage Guide and you’ll get insights you probably never considered looking for: see the ancient connotations of modern words with the Sense Section, reveal meaning in biblical practices and customs with Cultural Concepts, connect the narrative with its geography with Atlas, and explore how respected scholars and theologians interpreted Scripture with links to key commentaries and dictionaries.

No matter where you are in your study, Logos 6 equips you for scholarly and rewarding insights.

2. Build better study habits

diy-bible-studyLogos 6 holds you accountable for daily Bible study. New customizable reading plans let you create plans from scratch and share them with friends and family, so you can stay on track and study as a group. Create a custom plan to read the Bible in a year, share successful reading plans with your study group and friends, and create a new syllabus for your next class. Daily readings and prayers are displayed on your Logos 6 home page, so you always know where to start your study.

Logos 6 also offers Lexham Press’ DIY Bible Study, a new multimedia resource that teaches effective ways to study the Bible and apply what you’ve learned to your life. Get video lessons on every book of the Bible, tutorials on Bible study principles, beautiful graphics and infographics to enhance your study, application-focused content, and a built-in plan that—in just 10 minutes a day—takes you through the entire Bible in a year.

3. Learn new study skills

original-language-toolsDo smarter Greek and Hebrew study with step-by-step tutorials. New interactive interlinear explorers show you how to compare modern translations with original texts, guiding you through transliteration, lemma formations, lexical values, and more. With these interactive tutorials, even the novice can start doing advanced original-language study.

Interactive alphabet tutors also teach you how to read, write, and pronounce Greek and Hebrew. Select any letter—from alpha to omega—and you’ll see how to write it in upper and lowercase, how to pronounce it, and common lemmas that start with that letter. Once you’ve practiced drawing the letter within the software, you’ll get a score on your accuracy, so you always know how to improve.

Improve your study with Logos 6

Study smarter, stay on track with your daily reading, and learn new skills: Logos 6 simplifies your study and helps you grow.

And for a limited time, you can get 15% off Logos 6, plus special gifts when you spend at least $500 during your Logos 6 purchase: save on Logos 6 today!

Get an Academic Advantage with Logos 6

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Logos 6 equips you with cutting-edge tools for intense academic work. Enter any passage and consult up-to-date journal articles, investigate textual variants, see cross-references in ancient literature, and connect cultural concepts across your Bible. As you study, keep track of your findings with built-in notes and highlights, and enter this information into your lesson or paper with the new text converter and automatic citations.

Check out some of Logos 6’s tools that will help you engage the text at any level:

Textual Variants

Enter any passage or verse and explore the textual differences in all of your critical resources. No more complex layouts or time-consuming library searches—the new Textual Variants tool lets you investigate textual differences, consult textual commentaries, compare ancient versions and manuscripts, and view extant manuscripts online—all within a single guide report.

See the Textual Variants tool in action:

Ancient Literature

Interact with the Bible like never before with the new Ancient Literature tool. This powerful tool exposes thousands of biblical quotes, allusions, and echoes in ancient texts. See the comparative literature that surrounded the Bible and discover how a passage was interpreted by later Jewish and Christian traditions.

See the Ancient Literature tool in action:

Cultural Concepts

Gain a better understanding of the biblical world with the new Cultural Concepts tool. With just one click, you can search your entire Bible for a cultural concept, then access references to the same concept in ancient texts.

See the Cultural Concepts tool in action:

Propositional Flow Outline

See the flow of Paul’s writings and the intent of every line of text with the new Propositional Flow Outline. This new graphic layout applies to your morphological tagged English and Greek texts.

See the Propositional Flow Outline in action:

Text Converter

Streamline your workflow with new research tools like the Text Converter. Quickly convert Greek and Hebrew texts into a number of transliteration schemes, then input them into your research paper or notes.

See the Text Converter in action:

Notes

Keep track of your findings as you study with notes. Logos’ updated notes tool lets you create notes in any resource, attach notes to multiple references, and share them with your class or study group.

See notes in action:

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Discover more ways you can enhance your academic studies with Logos 6: get it today!