Last Chance: Round 1 Ends Today!

MM_200X200-05Round 1 of Logos March Madness ends today at 5 p.m. If you haven’t voted, vote now! If you have voted, help your favorite authors—share them on Facebook and Twitter.

Once Round 1 is finished, 32 authors will remain, vying for your votes to move on. For each author in Round 2, we’ll discount a collection or title by 35%.

Here are a few authors predicted to win and move on from Round 1:

  1. N. T. Wright
  2. John Piper
  3. Charles Spurgeon
  4. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

Want to see whose works will be discounted by 35%? Sign up to receive exclusive Logos March Madness updates!





Remember: get your votes in, and share with your friends.
Vote now!

Need a Bigger Book Budget? Prove It.

Pastor's LibraryYou need more books.

Whether you’re a pastor, missionary, chaplain, or church leader, you know you need more books. Most churches and organizations know you need more books, too; that’s why they give you a book budget.

But what if you need more books than your budget allows? What if your book budget just isn’t up-to-date? What if you don’t have a book budget at all?

How do you prove that you need a bigger book budget?

It’s a difficult thing to prove objectively . . . unless you have some stats to back it up.

The Pastor’s Library survey is back!

It’s time to get you some current statistics. We’re getting thousands of pastors and church leaders to weigh in on important book budget matters, like:

  • Does your church provide you with a book budget?
  • How has the cost of books changed?
  • How big should your book budget be?
  • How do congregation sizes relate to book budgets?

Take this 10-minute survey now. Once we get enough responses, we’ll share the results. We’ll also help you gauge how big your book budget should be, so when you ask for a bigger book budget, you’ll have the numbers to back it up.

This survey helps everyone

When you take this survey, you’re not only helping yourself. You’re also helping all these people:

  • Your congregation. You’ll understand how much money you need for books—books to help you preach the Word to your church.
  • Your family. With a bigger book budget from the church, you’ll spend less of your family’s cash out-of-pocket on books, so you can spend it on other necessities.
  • Other pastors everywhere. Your response makes this survey more reliable, helping other pastors get the book budgets they need, too.
  • Logos (and therefore, you again). Our mission is to serve the church, and the better we know you, the better we can serve you.

So, you need a bigger book budget? Let’s prove it—take the Pastor’s Library survey right now.

20 Resurrection Sermons Just Waiting to Be Preached

More people go to church on Easter than on any other day of the year, and churches around the world are preparing for more visitors. How do you get ready for them without cutting into sermon prep time?

What if you could save so much time on sermon prep that planning for extra parking, extra seating, extra childcare, extra ushers, and other important things didn’t come at the expense of a great Easter sermon?

Or better yet: what if you could strategize the next two decades’ worth of Easter sermon ideas right now?


20 Easter sermon ideas right now? No way.

It’s not as tough as you might think—not if Logos 5 has your back. Just look up the resurrection of Christ in the Sermon Starter Guide!

Resurrection Sermons

Immediately, you’ll get a list of key passages that describe the resurrection, and each one could be your starting point for a sermon:

  1. Why the resurrection was important to David, Israel, and us (Ps. 16:8–11, Ac. 2:29–31)
  2. Jesus, Jonah, and you (Mt. 12:40)
  3. Who witnessed the resurrected Savior? (1 Co. 15:3–8)
  4. Jesus: alive forevermore! (Re. 1:17–18)

You’ll also see links to entries in the Topic Guide for “Easter” and the “Resurrection of Christ.” These entries connect you to more passages and resources that address these topics, leading to more sermon ideas:

  1. What is Easter, anyway?
  2. What the resurrection meant to Matthew
  3. What the resurrection meant to Mark
  4. What the resurrection meant to Luke
  5. What the resurrection meant to John
  6. What the resurrection meant to Paul
  7. What the resurrection meant to Peter

And then you’ll find a long, long list of pericopes (Bible excerpts) that relate to the resurrection. This can give you a good idea for Scripture to read during worship. And of course, there are plenty of sermon ideas here, too:

  1. Jesus is risen—now what? (Mt. 28)
  2. Do you recognize him? (Lk. 24:13–35)
  3. Are you a doubting Thomas? (Jn. 20:19–29)
  4. Jesus still provides (Jn. 21:1–14)

The Sermon Starter also gives you entire thematic outlines to work from, so you can go straight to Logos for a skeleton to use in your Easter message:

  1. Who foretold Jesus’ resurrection?
  2. How sure can we be of Jesus’ resurrection?
  3. Why was Jesus’ resurrection necessary?
  4. What happened when Jesus rose from the grave?
  5. How do we benefit from the resurrection of Jesus?

And on top of all this, the Sermon Starter searches your library for sermon ideas and includes them in the report! You’ll also get links to hymns, media, and more supplementary sermon material.

What’s #21? You tell me!

When I started writing this post, my working title was “7 Easter Sermons Just Waiting to Be Preached.” Then I opened the Sermon Starter and realized that seven sermon ideas really sold this tool short. There are so many Easter sermon ideas in Logos 5.

And that’s just Easter. Now imagine how Logos can help you prep for Christmas, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day . . . the list goes on and on.

Don’t go another Sunday without the world’s leading Bible-study and sermon-prep software. Get Logos 5.

Already have Logos 5? Learn to use it for richer Bible study and ministry with our educational resources!

Preach Powerful Stories with Studies in Faithful Living

Studies in Faithful LivingFor many churchgoers, preaching represents the most important Bible study time of the week. For pastors, this creates a great sense of responsibility to use that time wisely and effectively. It can be challenging to unify a church through a study that balances engagement with depth. This is why Logos created the Studies in Faithful Living series, featuring Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, and Mary. Each volume comes as a complete church curriculum with sermon resources to simplify your sermon preparation and provide you with solid teaching tools.

The preaching resources include eight sermon outlines to equip you to preach powerful stories from the lives of the patriarchs and Mary. The sermon outlines are beautifully crafted and designed to complement and reinforce the small group lesson material found in the individual study version. At the same time, the sermons expand that material for your message, focusing on exhortation and application as well as interpretation and theology.

Each sermon also includes a teaching slideshow. With graphics, Scriptures, and reflection questions, the slideshows allow you to engage your congregation visually. The slideshows can be used as-is, or you can customize them to your own presentation style. Thumbnails of each slide appear within the sermon outline, providing a visual reference for you as you preach. Available in PowerPoint, Keynote, and Proclaim, they’re easy to use right out of the box.

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The included sermon outline handouts allow you to encourage your congregation in note-taking. In addition, an introductory sermon video and a set of graphics for the series offer your staff the tools they need to promote the sermon series.

The Studies in Faithful Living series is an engaging, thought-provoking curriculum that serves the entire church. Everyone benefits from studying the Word of God together, and these resources free up time and energy for pastors and teachers to turn their attention to the personal connections so essential for discipleship. Bring your church together around the Word with the Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan: Complete Church Curriculum or the Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection today!

Geerhardus Vos: Father of Reformed Biblical Theology

Geerhardus Vos, the “father of Reformed biblical theology,” was born 151 years ago this month. Vos, a professor of biblical theology at Princeton, lectured alongside many famous theologians, including J. Gresham Machen, B. B. Warfield, and Abraham Kuyper. So great was Vos’ academic insight that Kuyper offered him the chair of Old Testament studies at the Free University of Amsterdam when Vos was just 24.

Currently in translation into English for the first time ever, Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics is an important expression of his Reformed theology. Originally published by Vos in 5 volumes, it represents the early thought of one of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries’ premiere Reformed thinkers.

Individual titles:

  • Reformed Dogmatics: Theology Proper
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Anthropology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Christology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Soteriology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Ecclesiology, The Means of Grace, Eschatology

Reformed Dogmatics begins with an examination of the doctrine of God—his knowability, names, being, and character. Vos discusses the evidence for the Trinity in Scripture, explores human nature, sin, and the covenant of grace, and discusses the natures and incarnation of Christ.  Finally, he takes a look at the work of Christ, as well as the church’s nature and purpose. The result is some of the most profound systematic theology of the twentieth century.

Here’s what other scholars said about Vos:

“Dr. Vos was the greatest pedagogue I ever sat under.”—Cornelius Van Til

“. . . the most penetrating exegete it has been my privilege to know.”—John Murray

“Vos’ insights are penetrating, refreshing, and orthodox.” —James T. Dennison Jr.

Don’t miss this important piece of Reformed theology—pre-order now and save 22%!

Rational Arguments for God and the World

For many philosophers, God’s existence resolves otherwise unsolvable puzzles. The great rationalistsRené Descartes, Baruch Spinoza, and Gottfried Leibniz—argued that knowledge comes not from the senses, but from reason and innate ideas. From there, they developed some fascinating notions of God and the world.

Descartes

Widely considered the father of modern philosophy, Descartes introduced Cartesian doubt and the cogito. In his Discourse on Method and Meditations, he resolved to doubt all that could be doubted. Can you doubt that you’re reading this blog post? Of course; you might be dreaming. Can you doubt that a square has four sides? Yes; a demon might be causing you to err. But a demon couldn’t trick you if you didn’t exist at all. Hence his famous cogito: “I think, therefore I am” (Cogito, ergo sum).

So why not continue doubting the whole world? Because God is good. Our inclination to believe in the world is so strong that if the world did not exist, God would be deceitful; therefore, the world exists.

Spinoza

Baruch Spinoza understood God as in every way infinite. Thought and matter, he argued, are attributes of God, and so are human souls. The chief end of humanity is not personal immortality, but union with the divine.

If the world is an attribute of God, to understand the world is to understand God. “The mind’s highest good,” Spinoza wrote in Ethics, “is the knowledge of God, and the mind’s highest virtue is to know God.” That’s a description, though, not a command—according to Spinoza, if you understand the world, such a higher good is inevitable. If you know all things to point to God, the idea of God will fully occupy your mind.

Leibniz

Building on arguments that stretch back to Aristotle, Leibniz refined four proofs of God’s existence:

  1. Ontological. In an argument built on St. Anselm and Descartes, Leibniz argued in Monadology that “There is . . . or there can be conceived, a subject of all perfections, or most perfect Being. . . . it follows also that he exists, for existence is among the number of the perfections.” That is, the essence of God is perfection, and a God who exists is better than a God who does not; therefore, God exists.
  2. Cosmological. Aristotle noted that all actions have causes, which in turn have causes, which in turn have causes. But the series can’t be infinite; the first action must be uncaused. God is the universe’s uncaused cause. Leibniz, in turn, saw the universe as contingent—not demanded by logic, not inevitable. Given that logic permits the universe not to be, and that the universe contains no reason for its being, it points to a reason beyond itself: God.
  3. Eternal truth. Leibniz observed that statements—thoughts—are true in different ways. Though “it’s sunny” may sometimes (or, in Bellingham, rarely) be true, “2 + 2 = 4” is true eternally. And thoughts are the work of minds. An eternal truth must be the work of an eternal mind: God’s.
  4. Design. The world, noted Leibniz, is full of things that can’t be explained by blind natural forces. Such things testify to a creator. Though Leibniz advanced this argument long before Darwin proposed evolution, Leibniz’s point sounds familiar: it’s the thrust of today’s Intelligent Design.

Such notions and proofs of God aren’t biblical, of course. They’re grounded in pure reason, and that’s what makes them fascinating. It’s worth remembering that, in seeking to explain the world, some of the West’s most important thinkers turned to God.

The Classics in Rationalist Philosophy Collection articulates these arguments and more

And right now, it’s on Community Pricing at 84% off! With more bids, the price could go even lower.

Revisit some of philosophy’s most interesting arguments about God, mind, and the worldplace your bid now.

Then sign up to get news and updates about more classic works of history, literature, and philosophy:





How Knox’s Degrees Fit Your Busy Life

Scott_LindseyToday’s guest post is by Scott Lindsey, our ministry relations director here at Logos.

To say my life is “crazy busy” is an understatement. I’ve been married to the love of my life for 21 years. I have five amazing children. My wife and I home school. And I travel. When I say “travel,” I mean over 100,000 miles per year. They know me at many major airports. I have a “United Airlines” tattoo. (Ok, maybe not.)

In 2012, Logos and Knox Theological Seminary created a game-changing partnership. A partnership combining the best in theological resources and technology with a world-class faculty and seminary. When I first heard about the partnership, I thought, “Where have you been all my life?” I’ve always wanted to go to seminary, but moving my family, quitting Logos, and going back to school fulltime is not an option. But the Logos/Knox program is a very viable option!

Three weeks ago, I started my seminary journey—I enrolled in the MABTS program at Knox. It’s exceeded my expectations on many levels:

  1. The classroom comes to you. Technology allows Knox to bring the lectures to your computer screen with world-class instructors like Drs. Bruce Waltke, Warren Gage, John Frame, Gerald Bray, Samuel Lamerson, and others. I’ve even watched lectures on my iPhone while sipping coffee at my favorite coffee shop.
  2. Portfolio! Imagine a $78,000 theological library at your fingertips. As I mentioned, I’m a big fan of Logos, but as a student, I’m learning much more about this amazing tool. And when I graduate, the library will be mine forever. I did my MBA through distance education, and graduated with about 20 books. This time, I’ll graduate with over 2,500 books for a lifetime of learning.
  3. Learning at my own pace. Yes, I have lots of assignment deadlines now, but I get to decide when to do the course lectures, readings, and other materials. I can watch lectures at 31,000 feet, finish course readings on my iPad in bed, or do my writing assignments during my lunch break with my laptop. When I think about all the time I’ve wasted on trivial things like TV, surfing the web, and posting what I eat to Facebook, I realize I would rather use that time to learn more about my God and my faith.

So, if you heard about the Knox/Logos partnership and thought to yourself, “I would love to do that, but my life is just too crazy!”—believe me, you can do it! And you’ll be glad you did.

You’ll deepen your love for the Gospel and get in-depth training for effective ministry with Knox’s online MABTS. To learn more or apply now, call 1-800-210-6466 or visit SeminaryDegreesOnline.com/Degrees/MABTS.

Get a Free Book on Community Pricing!

Community Pricing lets you help choose the price on some terrific books. It’s one of the best ways to get a great deal: we’ve seen savings of over 90% on some books and collections! Check out this quick video to see how simple it is to save with Community Pricing:


Try It Out and Get a Free Book!

We want to everyone to try out Community Pricing risk-free. To help spread the word, we’re giving away F. W. Farrar’s The Messages of the Book on Community Pricing!

Here’s how to get it: simply place your bid on the book, and if your bid is at or above the closing price, you’ll get the book for free when it becomes available for download.

Spread the Word

Community Pricing relies on—you guessed it—community. The more people bid on a book or collection, the better the chance to drive the price down. So tell your friends about it, and show them how easy it is to save!

fb1.pngFacebook: post this blog article to your wall by leaving a Facebook comment below or post a link to The Messages of the Book!

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Google Plus: share a link to this post or to The Messages of the Book, telling everyone in your circles to bid now and get this resource free.

bl1.pngBlog: if you have a blog, you can write a post letting your readers know about Community Pricing and this fun promotion—link to this post if you want—and encouraging them to bid.

 

Check Out These Other Books on Community Pricing

Browse our full catalog of Community Pricing books, and check out these three featured collections:

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What’s the Significance of Biblical Words?

If you missed the Pastorum Live 2012 conference, you missed out on powerful teaching from 21 of evangelicalism’s leading scholars. Pastorum Live featured more than just lofty theology; it was scholarly teaching instantly applicable to your study and ministry.

In this short clip, Dr. Mark Futato explains what the specific word choices in Scripture can tell us about God and his character.


Join Dr. Futato, Ed Stetzer, Dr. John Walton, Jonathan Dodson and many others in Chicago April 11–12 for Pastorum 2013. When you register for Pastorum by Friday, March 8, you’ll receive a discounted rate—only $79! Register now!

How to Endorse Logos, Even if You’re Not Famous

Base Packages IIWe love helping people get into the Word. Every time someone gives us a shout-out, it tells us that we’re on the right track. That goes for prominent Christians and everyday users alike. Like Jayson said a few weeks ago, every single endorsement matters, including yours.

In fact, anytime you want to comment on a product, you can write a public review on our website.

3 reasons your review is important:

  • You help others make an informed decision. You get to list all your favorite features, titles, articles, and the like, along with areas in which a product could improve. Your honest review might be just what someone else needs to start using Logos 5 to study the Word.
  • You keep us accountable to excellence. You can rate any product up to 5 stars, call out the ways in which a product helps you with Bible study, and help guide Logos Bible Software as we pursue our company mission to serve the church.
  • You get to share new ways to use our software. We have a pretty big group of people working here (and we’re hiring more!), but there’s no way we can cover every single way that Logos 5 can improve Bible study in every walk of life. But you know how it helps you, and you can share your story with others like you.

So, what do you think of Logos 5?

If you own a Logos 5 base package, write up a review and rate it on the product page! Here are quick links to each one—join the conversations at the bottom of each page (make sure you’re signed in).

Want to weigh in on products outside of base packages? You can review those, too—start now!