Not Your Average Wordbook


The Lexham Theological Wordbook is a new breed of language tool, one built for any student of the Bible. Craig Bartholomew explains:

In a day in which seminaries and universities are loosening their hold on the biblical languages Lexham Press is boldly leading the way towards a constructive and thoroughly contemporary retrieval. The Lexham Theological Wordbook is a marvelous resource for scholars, pastors, seminarians, and for those whose knowledge of the biblical languages is limited. Scripture is given to us in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek, and we need this sort of help in excavating its riches. This Wordbook is based on the best current linguistic insights and will be a resource that I keep close at hand. The Wordbook is an ambitious and major achievement and should and will be used widely.

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Coming Soon: Two New Lexham Bible Guides

Since the first volume was released five years ago, the Lexham Bible Guides have become some of our most popular resources. The series has grown to cover the entire Pauline corpus and two volumes on Genesis. Now, two new volumes are on the horizon: Jonah and 1 Peter. Both of these volumes should be released before the end of the year—and now is your last chance to take advantage of the pre-order discount.

The Lexham Bible Guides are designed to do all the work of searching through commentaries, journal articles, and monographs to find the information you need, saving you valuable time by curating all of the best literature in one place.

Get answers to tough questions

The Lexham Bible Guides don’t just present you with raw research data. The curated and annotated notes on the various viewpoints and interpretive options within the text allow you to quickly synthesize a broad range of views on a particular passage. Dense, jargon-filled research is distilled into easy-to-understand comments. Each volume gives you the tools you need to find answers quickly.

For example, the book of Jonah presents a number of interpretive challenges that could be illuminated by a plethora of viewpoints. Let’s look at how scholarship has handled the great fish that swallowed Jonah. Here are three perspectives (among many) presented in the Lexham Bible Guide:

  • Allen (1976, 213) says God snatches his servant from death’s clutches at the last moment. The fish represents Yahweh’s grace, and the incident demonstrates his power over the sea and its creatures. He considers the significance of “three days and three nights” to be uncertain, though he discusses several proposals. (NICOT: The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah)
  • Ellison (1986, 374–75) considers “three days and three nights” to be an approximation. He thinks we should ask why God chose the fish and not some floating wreckage to save Jonah: “Miracle is not the gratuitous display of God’s omnipotence, nor is it called out merely because of human need. Taken in its setting, it is probable that every miracle has a spiritual significance hence the use of ‘sign’ to describe it in John.” He contends that, for the book’s original audience, the fish represents Leviathan (see, Pss. 74:13–14; 104:25). The fish itself is secondary, but it demonstrated to the prophet that God’s love is operative in a world under divine control. (The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 7: Daniel and the Minor Prophets)
  • Page (1995, 239–42) discusses why God chose the fish as the way to return Jonah. He seems to prefer the theory that the belly of the fish was a “good place to learn” given Jonah’s awareness of the significance of Leviathan in the Old Testament (Pss. 74:13–14; 104:26). Page considers various options for the meaning of “three days and three nights” and concludes that “no compelling reason exists to disbelieve the literal span of time indicated. In fact, none of the Old Testament allusions of a similar nature are necessarily figurative. The major point is that God, through the fish, could sustain this pouting prophet during ‘unbelievable’ circumstances and return him to the place where he could renew his commission to serve.” (NAC: Amos, Obadiah, Jonah)

We have three perspectives that emphasize God’s sovereign power over nature, each with their own unique analysis on the biblical account. And if you have any of those commentaries referenced in the Bible Guide, you’ll be able to navigate directly to the relevant section in them with the inline links.

Save time and money

Jumpstart your research. Pre-order Lexham Bible Guide: Jonah and Lexham Bible Guide: 1 Peter today!

Kevin Vanhoozer on How Confessions of Faith Affect Christian Living


Our Logos Mobile Education crew met up with Kevin Vanhoozer of Trinity Evangelical Divinity near Chicago to film a new course on doctrine and discipleship: Theological Interpretation of Scripture in the Church. While we were there, we discussed a new project he’s been working on—A Reforming Catholic Confession—and also asked: How do confessions of faith affect Christian living? Here’s what Vanhoozer had to say. [Read more…]

Thinking of Getting Logos? Read This.


I spent hours looking over Logos base packages before I bought one (Gold). I did the same before I upgraded (Platinum).

How can you make an informed purchasing decision? Which base package do you need? The homework necessary to figure it out may be daunting. I’m going to give you a few shortcuts, and I’m convinced you’ll come to the same conclusion I did: a Logos base package is the best way to buy a theological library.

(And right now, the deal is even better: you can get 20% off a base package for a limited time.) [Read more…]

What a Viral Video Tells Us about a Reformation Truth

There’s a makeover video on YouTube that is now clocking in at 25 million views. And it points, through a sad irony, to a truth recovered 500 years ago at the Reformation.

The timelapse video shows Jim Wolf’s stunning transformation from unkempt street guy to bespoke-suited executive. And yet Jim told interviewers later, “The outside matters nothin’. Like I say I’m totally a Christian, and what’s . . . inside you is [what’s] important to Jesus.”

It may not be that the outside matters nothin’ (faith without works is dead), but Jim understands what Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation fought to make clear: inside you is what’s important to Jesus. [Read more…]

3 Reasons There’s Never Been a Better Time to Get Logos 7

20% off Logos 7

Whether you’re just starting out with Logos, own an earlier base package, or just want to upgrade your Logos 7 library, now is the perfect time to get a base package. For a limited time, Logos 7 is 20% off. And if you need more reasons, here are three good ones to consider: [Read more…]

God Wasn’t Alone before He Created the World (Says the Bible)

As finite beings in a finite universe, it’s almost impossible for us to imagine what God was doing before time and matter as we know it was created. Was God alone? Was he adrift in a vast nothingness? Does the Bible give us any indication what life was like before the universe existed?

These are some of the questions that Dr. Michael S. Heiser (Ph.D. in Hebrew Bible and Semitic Languages at the University of Wisconsin-Madison) answers in his provocative and enlightening book The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible.

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Logos Pro Tech Tip: Reforming the Way You Study the Works of Jonathan Edwards

Few American theologians have shaped Christian thinking, preaching, and even revival practices as much as Jonathan Edwards. And Edwards left many volumes of memoirs, letters, sermons, and notes. His “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” is probably the most famous English sermon ever written, and is studied to this day by students of American literature. However, the popularity of this sermon has led some to dismiss Edwards as merely a “hellfire and brimstone” preacher.

In this week’s video, we’ll take a look at the Works of Jonathan Edwards, Yale Edition, and discover how easy it is to search for key terms and theological concepts inside the writings of this towering Christian figure.
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Why Luther’s 95 Theses Start with a Critique of a Bible Translation

The first of Luther’s famous 95 Theses—whose 500th anniversary we celebrate today—is a critique of an erroneously translated phrase in Jerome’s translation of Matthew 4:17. In English we know this as, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” Luther wrote in Thesis 1,

When our Lord and Master Jesus Christ said, Poenitentiam agite, he willed the entire life of believers to be one of repentance. (See Luther’s Works, 31:25)

Luther does not come out and say that Jerome erred—not on October 31, 1517. But by at least May 30, 1518, writing to mentor Johann von Staupitz, he feels that the Roman church was indeed “misled by the Latin term, because the expression poenitentiam ag[ite] suggests more an action than a change in disposition.” It makes Jesus sound like he’s saying, “Do penance.” And, Luther says, “in no way does this do justice to the Greek.” (Luther’s Works, 48:67–68) What Jesus really said was, “Repent.” And as Luther says in the second of the 95 theses, he meant “inner repentance” producing “various outward mortifications of the flesh.” (31:25)
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Last Day to Save 50% on This Karl Barth Collection!

This is your last chance to pre-order T&T Clark’s 19-volume Karl Barth Collection before it ships. The pre-pub price is $199.99, more than 50% off the regular price!
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