How to Search for Sermons by Venue

A Logos user presented the following scenario to me:

I’m a traveling itinerate preacher speaking in various churches, but do revisit the same churches periodically. If I start using the Sermon Editor to archive my messages, is there a way to search the files by location so I don’t preach the same sermon in the same church? [Read more…]

The Intersection of Revelation and Reason

The relationship between human reason and divine revelation has been a perennial topic of discussion among philosophers and systematic theologians. Throughout Church history, Christians have been tempted to make revelation and reason mutually exclusive. But both are essential to a true understanding of the faith.

The inaugural Theology Connect conference—held in Sydney in July 2016—was dedicated to surveying the intersection of revelation and reason. The fruit of this conference has been drawn together in Revelation and Reason in Christian Theology. [Read more…]

Classic Revival Sermons, Hymns, Memoirs, and More

 

George Whitefield was perhaps the most famous preacher of the eighteenth century—and for good reason. He fearlessly and tirelessly preached an unashamed gospel through a life completely consecrated to God. He was renowned for his powerful oratory, leaving massive crowds mesmerized, and it’s estimated he preached well over 15,000 times to millions and millions of people in America and the UK. [Read more…]

How to Find Words Unique to a Book in the Bible

A fellow Logos user recently emailed me an excellent question:

Is there a way to find the words in a particular NT book (e.g. Philippians) that are unique to it? In other words, they are not used elsewhere in the NT?

Even though at first glance the question sounds like a huge task, actually it’s quite simple through the use of Word Lists: [Read more…]

Unparalleled in Our Times: Save on Renowned Commentary Set

Albert Mohler, Jr., president of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, says The MacArthur New Testament Commentary series is “nothing less than a library of faithful exegesis and exposition” that is “unparalleled in our times.”

And this month only, you can get the complete set of The MacArthur New Testament Commentary series (33 vols.) for 35% off. Already own volumes in this series? Dynamic Pricing customers have a rare opportunity to snag the entire set at an even deeper discount—you’ll get the best deal possible without paying for the same volume twice.

From beloved and respected Bible scholar and preacher John MacArthur, The MacArthur New Testament Commentary series continues to be one of today’s top-selling commentary collections. Each volume:

  • Gives a verse-by-verse analysis in context
  • Provides rigorous exegesis of the New Testament
  • Addresses key theological themes and issues in the biblical text
  • Illuminates the biblical text in practical and relevant ways
  • Provides points of application for passages

And in the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for, and take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps.

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Don’t wait! Dynamic Pricing doesn’t come around often for this product. Grab The MacArthur New Testament Commentary Complete Set (33 vols.) for 35% off today before the sale ends on July 31.

Last Chance for Early Bird Pricing

Our guest author is Dr. Gerry Breshears, a professor of theology at Western Seminary and a Faithlife Mobile Ed instructor.

I was raised in a great Christian family going to church. But when I asked some basic questions like, “Why do you think Jesus was God?” I was told in effect, “Nice Christian boys don’t ask questions like that.”

As I sank deep into the despair of Ayn Randian selfishness, an intelligent Christian friend challenged me to look firsthand at Jesus. So I read the Gospels personally, something I had never done before. Jesus who had been a moral illustration for doctrinal sermons grabbed my imagination. I found him to be the most amazing human ever. I wondered, “Why didn’t someone introduce me to him?” and began a lifelong quest to know him deeply and personally. [Read more…]

What Walking on Water Really Means

Tales of tempests battering ships inspire respect for the sea. En route to Capernaum, Jesus’ disciples watched these stories become reality as the roaring wind transformed the waters around them. As they fought against the waves and wind, they witnessed a miracle: “They saw Jesus walking on the sea and coming near the boat” (John 6:19).

Appearing in three of the four Gospels, this event inspires Sunday school lessons and has become ingrained in our portrait of Jesus’ life. As spectacular and unforgettable as the event is to us, however, a Jewish audience would have seen in it a profound theological meaning against the backdrop of the Old Testament.

An Old Testament Symbol

In the Old Testament, the unpredictable sea is a common symbol of cosmic disorder—conditions contrary to God’s design for an ordered world. This symbol for cosmic anarchy is also personified as a sea monster, known as Leviathan or Rahab. The image of chaos as an untamed monster in a churning, erratic sea was common throughout the ancient world. People accustomed to land would naturally view the vast, raging ocean as uncontrollable and potentially deadly, filled with terrifying unknown creatures.

Religions across the ancient Mediterranean often depicted their important deities destroying or subduing the sea dragon, thereby calming the sea and restoring order. In the Old Testament, it is Yahweh, the God of Israel, who conquers the forces of chaos and imposes order in the cosmos (Job 26:12–13; Psa 89:5–14). This imagery is applied even to the exodus from Egypt (Psa 74:12–17), where God split the sea to deliver his people, thereby conquering the forces of evil that sought their demise.

Final Victory

God’s ultimate victory at the end of the age is also depicted as God dominating the forces of the sea: “In that day the Lord with his hard and great and strong sword will punish Leviathan the twisting serpent, Leviathan the crooked serpent, and he will slay the dragon that is in the sea” (Isa 27:1). This is why the description of the final paradise of the new heaven and new earth contains the phrase, “the sea was no more” (Rev 21:1).

The prophet Daniel’s vision of the end of days and the kingdom of God includes four beasts that emerge out of a storm-tossed sea (Dan 7:1–8). These beasts are not aquatic creatures by nature. They come from the sea because they represent chaos. God’s heavenly court sentences the beasts to death (Dan 7:9–12), after which the “son of man” arrives immediately to receive the kingdom of God (Dan 7:13–14). All of this imagery informs John’s account of Jesus walking on the sea during the storm.

Jesus Christ, Lord over the Sea

John identifies Jesus as the Son of Man to whom the Father has given the authority to execute judgment (John 5:27; compare Matt 26:57–68). John also asserts repeatedly that Jesus is God incarnate. In John’s Gospel, Jesus invokes the divine name (“I AM”) seven times in reference to himself (e.g., John 6:35; 15:1). He declares oneness with the Father (John 10:30), and he proclaims that the Father is in him and he is in the Father (John 10:37–38).

For John, a Jew familiar with the Old Testament, the image of Jesus walking on the sea was a dramatic portrayal that Jesus is Yahweh—the one who subdues the forces of chaos and imposes his will on the waters and everything the waters represent. The kingdom of the Son of Man had begun, and all forces opposing God’s ordained order would now be defeated. Like Jesus’ disciples, we can find comfort in knowing that the one who treads upon the volatile sea can subdue whatever chaos threatens to overwhelm us.

QUICKBIT: The three accounts of Jesus walking on water are found in John 6:16–21, Matthew 14:22–33 and Mark 6:45–52—the Gospels authored by Jewish writers. Luke doesn’t include this detail, likely because he was a gentile writing to a gentile friend, Theophilus (Luke 1:1–4).

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What Walking on Water Really MeansDr. Michael S. Heiser is a scholar-in-residence for Faithlife, the makers of Logos Bible Software. He is the author of The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible and has taught many Mobile Ed courses, including Problems in Biblical Interpretation: Difficult Passages I.

This article is excerpted from Dr. Heiser’s book I Dare You Not to Bore Me with the Bible.

Discover more fascinating aspects of the Bible with Dr. Heiser

Keep exploring the strange, perplexing, and mysterious aspects of the Bible with these excerpts from Dr. Michael S. Heiser’s The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible. Or dive deeper into the supernatural world of the Bible and pick up a copy of The Unseen Realm today.

Get a Free Course Plus Two More for under $30

Every month Logos gives you a book for free, plus deep discounts on two additional books. But this month you have a unique chance to get a popular Mobile Ed course for free, plus two more courses at great prices.

Take this opportunity to discover how Logos Mobile Ed courses can help you grow in knowledge and understanding of Scripture. This month only, less than $30 gets you three courses focused on how we got the New Testament as it is today. [Read more…]

Know Your Faith, Engage Your World, Confidently Defend Truth

The history and heritage of Christianity. Creeds and their critical role in the formation of the Church leading up to today. Bible versions and their dependability. Answering those who say Christianity is for fools and has no answers for the intellectual mind.

These are vitally important areas of Christian thought and knowledge, and exploring them helps you become more confident in your faith. The newest releases from Lexham Press answer questions about these topics to equip you to know your faith, better engage your world, and confidently defend what you know is true. [Read more…]

Someone Plagiarized My Book a Century Before I Was Born

In my recent book, Authorized: The Use and Misuse of the King James Bible, I argued that there were two major kinds of archaic words in the KJV, not one.

And in the most flagrant example I’ve ever seen of plagiarism by time machine, I just discovered a commentator from 150 years ago saying precisely the same thing.

In his Lectures Exegetical and Practical on the Epistle of James, published in 1871, Robert Johnstone quotes a verse from the King James Version: [Read more…]