Let Logos 7 Streamline Your Sermon Prep

perfect-for-every-pastorPastoral ministry is as tough as it is rewarding. Between church services, Bible studies, visitations, community involvement, board meetings, and any number of emergencies, it’s hard to find focused time for quality sermon prep. Logos 7 offers a lifeline to busy pastors like you, getting you from preparation to the pulpit faster—without sacrificing quality.

Your own personal sermon prep assistant

Imagine sticking your head out of your office, and giving a personal research assistant a topic or Scripture passage. In seconds he fires back a list of relevant sermon ideas, preaching themes, and sermon outlines. With Logos 7’s Sermon Starter Guide, that’s what you get. Not only that, you’ll be directed to an archive of sermons from well-known preachers and teachers, so you can see how they have carefully handled the same passage or topic. The Sermon Starter Guide gives you a great foundation to begin building your sermon.

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Transform Any Resource into a Browsable Index with Logos

build-indexMost Christians who are dedicated to studying the Bible have at least three books in their personal, print libraries:

  • Bible
  • Study Bible
  • Concordance

In this blog post I want to focus on that third book. A traditional print concordance lists every time an English word appears in a specific version of the Bible. When I studied with print books I owned three concordances: one each for the KJV, NASB, and NIV.

For years I’ve told Logos users that concordances are unnecessary in the software because the search engine quickly finds every time a word, phrase or lemma appears in the Bible.

But now in Logos 7 there’s a tool called Concordance. Is it “unnecessary”? Absolutely not!

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The Road to Becoming a Logos Trainer: An Interview with Morris Proctor

interview-with-morrisHe’s one of our most enthusiastic ambassadors now, but certified Logos Bible Software trainer Morris Proctor admits he was practically forced to try Logos for the first time.

“When the personal computer age hit, I was reluctant to enter the electronic world, choosing rather to stay in the comfort zone of pen and paper,” Morris says. But then a friend sat the pastor in front of a borrowed computer, booted up Logos, and demanded he learn how to use it, promising, “This will revolutionize your Bible study and sermon prep.”

“I was shocked to discover the profound impact this new method of study had on my Biblical research and sermon preparation,” remembers Morris.

Twenty years later, Morris is a Logos master, travelling the world to train fellow pastors, preachers, church leaders, and other Christians to use Logos.

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Setting the Stage for Biblical Understanding: An Interview with Matthew Emerson and Heath Thomas


We recently had the chance to talk with two authors from the Transformative Word series to get their take on what makes this series valuable. Matthew Emerson wrote the volume on Revelation and Heath Thomas wrote the volume on Habakkuk.

What makes the Transformative Word series unique?

Matthew Emerson

Matthew Emerson

Matthew Emerson: In my experience writing my Revelation volume and perusing the others published so far, Transformative Word is unique in a few ways. First, the series is unique in its aim. Each volume is an overview of a particular biblical book. While some commentaries provide overviews in their introductions, these titles seek to do so in a way that is directly applicable to the reader. Second, Transformative Word is unique in its audience. Many publishers go for the “scholarly but for lay people” market, but I think Lexham has actually pulled it off with this series. These volumes are written by those with scholarly ability who nevertheless are deeply connected to and involved in the church, perhaps even vocationally. The authors thus bring both academic ability and pastoral sensitivity to their writing.

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3 Practical Tips to Keep in Mind When You Quote Scripture

3-tips-quoteWrenching a Bible verse out of context isn’t the only bad Bible-quoting habit out there. There is a more subtle set of unfortunate customs we use in evangelical churches when we quote the Bible.

Here’s an example: a relative of mine was reading to me her salvation testimony as she prepared to deliver it to her church. It’s a stirring story, full of God’s grace. At the beginning she said,

Ephesians chapter 2, verses 4 through 5, states, ‘But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved.’

It is the height of rudeness to complain about someone’s Bible quotation practices after they read their beautiful conversion testimony.

It’s a good thing my relatives love me.

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How to Know That You Know the Bible

I want to know the Bible. Do you?

There are many methods for Bible study out there, and every one I’ve ever seen has something of value to contribute. Let me add one, however, that I’ve never seen anyone else explain: borrow an open secret from teachers everywhere—consider using this scaffold worked out by pedagogical experts:

  1. Remember
  2. Understand
  3. Apply
  4. Analyze
  5. Evaluate
  6. Create

You may recognize these six steps as “Bloom’s Taxonomy,” a model created by educational theorists and in use, with a tweak or two, for the last 60 or so years. It helps teachers lead students steadily, in discernible steps, from ignorance to knowledge.

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9 Reasons I Use Logos When I Preach

pastors-need-logosLogos 7 is my preferred tool for sermon preparation, but history proves you don’t have to use Logos in order to teach the Bible carefully and effectively. Somehow Paul managed pretty well without it. Augustine and Chrysostom reportedly didn’t use it either. Calvin, Luther, Edwards, Spurgeon, Bavinck, Lloyd-Jones, Frame; pick your heroes (I’m writing this, so I get to pick mine). I for one am thrilled if you live and preach the Bible, whether you use Logos to do it or not.

I’m confident that I preach and teach more effectively because I have Logos, but let me make something clear: I’m not saying digital is better than paper, or even that Augustine would have done better exegesis if he’d had Logos. Chesterton had it right:

If I set the sun beside the moon,
And if I set the land beside the sea,
And if I set the town beside the country,
And if I set the man beside the woman,
I suppose some fool would talk about one being better.

This is all true. Digital isn’t “better” than paper.

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Sync Your Highlights Across Multiple Bibles in 5 Clicks

sync highlights

I’ve had the privilege of teaching Camp Logos training seminars for many years now. And ever since the Highlighting feature appeared on the scene, there’s a very common question at Camp:

How can I highlight the text in one Bible and have those highlights show up in other Bibles?

Well, I have great news for you: that feature now exists in Logos 7! It’s a setting in the Visual Filter called Corresponding Notes and Highlights and it’s really cool.

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How to Identify a Passage’s Repeated Words in Seconds

repeated-wordsInductive Bible study consists of three phases: Observation, Interpretation, and Application. During Observation we’re encouraged to read the biblical text numerous times asking the journalistic questions Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How. Also, during this initial step of Bible study we’re supposed to identify any repeated words which may indicate an emphasis or theme.

For example in Luke 15 words like “lost,” “found,” and “rejoice” occur frequently and they do indeed point to the main point of the chapter.

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Is Your Bible Study Missing a Thematic Perspective?

TW-Promo-BlogHeaderCommentaries are a beloved and vital resource for modern students of the Bible. They give us expert insight into each verse of each chapter of each book of the Bible, and are often a great starting point for deeper research. But one thing the standard commentary typically doesn’t include is an emphasis on the themes of the given book. That’s where a thematic Bible study series truly shines.

Thematic studies center their exegesis around a specific theme or topic found in scripture, providing a unique, often narrative-driven perspective on the biblical book. This allows our theology to be shaped by the grand exegesis of scripture as opposed to having a single verse attempt to explain a theme or inform our theology. And our understanding of the Bible, as a whole, is enhanced when we’re able to properly grasp the themes and topics woven within Scripture.

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