Why You Should Integrate Audiobooks into Your Daily Routine

the-cost-of-discipleshipDon’t let day-to-day activities compete with your Bible study—instead, make them work together with audiobooks.

Audiobooks are perfect for when it feels like life is getting in the way of your study. They increase your productivity, help you integrate the Word into your life, and keep you grounded and focused on the things important to you. The struggle to choose between important day-to-day tasks and productive study doesn’t have to be difficult—with an audiobook, you can accomplish both.

Working out, hiking, driving, cooking, and other regular activities are all part of a healthy lifestyle. But when you’re doing them, you can’t read a book or study in front of a computer screen. It’s during these times that audiobooks shine: just choose your reading pace, then listen, learn, and find inspiration—regardless of what else you’re doing.

Audiobooks help you find time to think about important questions and find answers in places you may have overlooked. Watch this short video to see how you can integrate audiobooks into your daily routine:

 

Choose from 100+ audiobooks

Visit Logos.com/Audiobooks to see a selection of well-regarded works from respected authors and theologians.

Many of these audiobooks are currently on Pre-Pub, which means you’ll get the best deal when you pre-order them. When they ship, you’ll be able to listen to them on both your desktop and your mobile devices. And your play data will sync across platforms—you’ll be able to pick up right where you left off last time, regardless of the device you’re using.

Start by checking out these audiobooks:

See all 100+ audiobooks at Logos.com/Audiobooks and choose your favorites!

Webinar Recap: Sharpen Your Pastoral Care and Counseling

logos-5-webinar-free-trainingThis past week, in a webinar hosted by Logos expert James Fowler, we outlined some exceptional pastoral-care and counseling resources using Logos Bible Software. Fowler shared his knowledge on ways to build unique and useful counseling collections from the books you already own. He also demonstrated how to use the Cited By tool to find connections between Scripture and specific counseling situations.

If you missed the webinar, don’t worry! You can still watch the recording anytime you want and learn about all the benefits described in this important training session:

During this webinar, we featured the Chaplain’s Library, which is full of counseling resources. This extensive 591-title library provides a comprehensive collection of titles dedicated to grief counseling, discipleship, officiating, leadership, and important material for more thorough Bible study.

We’re planning additional virtual training events like this. Let us know via Facebook or Twitter what type of training you’d like us to put together for an upcoming webinar.  We value your feedback!

Then, make sure you’re in the loop: visit Logos.com/Webinar-Archive and sign up to hear about future webinar events. When we schedule the events you want, you’ll be among the first to know about them.

Logos 5: Attach Notes to Headwords

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Last week’s blog post about adding notes to verses generated some questions and comments, so I’m following up with a similar discussion about adding notes to headwords.

I’ll introduce the subject with a personal story. I remember years ago when I first started studying Scripture, every topic was brand new to me. As I studied passages, I investigated individual words and topics like Paul, redemption, Corinth, kosmos, and on and on. For every subject or word, I read articles in dictionaries, encyclopedias, and lexicons recording my findings on paper. Inevitably in a few weeks, I’d come across the same topic or word in a different text, so I’d either rifle through paper looking for my previous findings or start the study from scratch again. Digging a deep well from which to draw water was slow going for me in the beginning.

With my testimony as a backdrop, imagine every time you study an English, Hebrew, or Greek word, you deposit your discoveries safely in a notes document. Then the next time you study that same word, Logos will indicate that you’ve been down that road before, and with the click of a button, all of your previous research will be available to you!

Here’s how to do just that:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the Notes file something like “English Words” (A)
  • Open a Bible to a passage like Acts 4:36, in which Barnabas is mentioned (B)
  • Double click the word Barnabas to open a dictionary article about him (C)

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  • Right click anywhere within that article (D)
  • Select Headword Barnabas from the right-click menu (E)
  • Select Add a note to “English Words” (or whatever you named the notes document) (F)

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  • Notice that Logos creates a note in the file named Barnabas (G)
  • Also notice that Logos places a note indicator next to the headword in your dictionary (H)
  • Add all your research about Barnabas to the content box (I)

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  • Continue to add more text to this same content box as you conduct your normal research about Barnabas throughout various books
  • Close all the panels except your Bible
  • Pretend it is now weeks into the future
  • Take your Bible to Galatians 2:1, in which Barnabas is referenced again (J)
  • Right click the word Barnabas (K)
  • Select Selection Barnabas (L)
  • Select a resource, other than the one you previously opened, from the menu (M)

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  • Notice it opens to an article about Barnabas (N)
  • Look what is next to the headword in the dictionary: a note indicator saying you’ve studied this word or subject before
  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to see a preview of your content (O)

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  • Click the indicator to open the note

Since you added the note to the headword, every topical book containing an article with the headword Barnabas will have an indicator pointing to your notes document!

I encourage you also to create notes documents named “Hebrew Words” and “Greek Words“. With these files created, follow the same steps as you study Hebrew and Greek words. Over time, you’ll end up with your own personal “dictionaries” with riches you’ve mined from various resources!

If you enjoyed this, check out our other training materials for more helpful hints.

The Gospels and Red Volkswagens

mobile-ed-studies-in-the-gospels-bundleWhat if the order of the New Testament was on purpose? What if we read the Gospels not as four varying accounts, but as one inspired four-fold Gospel? How would our understanding of the rest of the New Testament change if we read it through the lens of this four-fold Gospel? These questions, posed to me by Dr. Jonathan Pennington, made me stop and think. To illustrate, he drew a helpful illustration for me, about a red Volkswagen.

If you were to go out and buy a red Volkswagen, something remarkable would happen to your perception and observation of other cars around you. You would begin to see, more than ever, many other red Volkswagens. For me, it was a blue ’75 VW Vanagon, but that’s beside the point. I could immediately see what he was getting at: when you saturate yourself in the Gospels and see them as the defining documents of the movement of Jesus followers, you begin to see them echoed and alluded to (not always in direct reference, of course) throughout the rest of the New Testament. The four-fold Gospel is, after all, the biography of Jesus the Messiah, upon whom the rest of the writers put their faith and whose followers they wrote to instruct.

This conversation with Dr. Pennington led me to reevaluate the fervor and depth of my own study of the Gospels, and I realized that I had only begun to skim the surface. That’s why I am excited about the Mobile Ed: Studies in the Gospel Bundle (9 courses).

This collection of Mobile Ed courses provides training from some of academia’s forefront scholars on the Gospels and this Jesus whose story they tell. This is an unprecedented opportunity for you to study from Jonathan Pennington, Daniel M. Doriani, Craig A. Evans, Mark L. Strauss, David E. Garland, and Joel Willitts. Combined, these authors and professors have spent decades studying Jesus and the Gospels, and they have produced many esteemed commentaries and monographs on the subjects.

This Mobile Ed bundle includes nine courses to ground you in a firm foundation of Gospel studies:

How do I use these courses?

Mobile Ed courses are carefully designed to fit your life and your learning style. For the full Mobile Ed experience, you can take the course in a structured environment within your software, taking full advantage of self-tests and quizzes, associated readings, and the course’s Faithlife group for discussion. The video lectures are available in short, logical thought-packets to help you learn more in less time. They are accompanied by transcripts to help you search, make notes, and follow along.

If you want to simply watch the videos, you can do that too—on your computer or your mobile device! This is perfect to learn alongside your spouse, or to enjoy learning during a long commute.

These courses can also be utilized like an enhanced commentary. Search them, quote them in papers and articles, and comb through their information as Logos 5 presents the data in its tools and features.

No matter how you learn, Logos Mobile Education will be a great fit for you. So dive into an in-depth study of Jesus and the Gospels with the best guides you could ask for!

Pre-order today and take 40% off the regular price.

Why Read Satire?

why-read-satire-noet-1English philosopher Francis Bacon wrote, “The monuments of wit survive the monuments of power.” In other words, while the trappings of power may decay, works of wit endure.

Among these works of wit is satire. Much more than just a joke at another’s expense, satire is the use of humor to expose faults and inspire change.

I love reading classic satirical literature. While appreciating the author’s razor-sharp pen and comical incisions, we get to study the social mores of another culture and era. And, amazingly, works of satire that were written hundreds of years ago still feel incredibly relevant to today, revealing the foibles of humanity that transcend any particular setting.

Among my favorite “monuments of wit” (by three monumentally witty authors!) are Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, and Charles Dickens’ Bleak House.

And best of all, they’re all available right now on Community Pricing!

Jonathan Swift vexes the world

When writing to his friend and fellow satirist Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift stated that his chief goal in writing Gulliver’s Travels was “to vex the world rather than divert it.”

why-read-satire-noet-jonathan-swiftGulliver’s Travels is presented as the travelogue of middle-class Englishman Lemuel Gulliver. Upon opening the book, the reader encounters an illustration of Gulliver and a history of his life prior to voyaging to fantastical lands. In true Enlightenment-era fashion, Gulliver presents his story in a rational manner—calm, clinical, and quantitative. By all appearances, it is no different from an ordinary travelogue (which were all the rage in eighteenth-century England).

In the unfolding narrative of his travels, Gulliver reminds the reader that his goal is “to relate plain matter(s) of fact in the simplest manner and style.” He takes his encounters with Lilliputians, giants, floating islands, intelligent horses, and the brutish Yahoos in stride—rarely expressing shock.

By presenting the fantastic as ordinary (or mildly unusual at most), Swift creates his first layer of irony. Professor Ernest Tuveson puts it best, stating, “In Gulliver’s Travels there is a constant shuttling back and forth between real and unreal, normal and absurd . . . until our standards of credulity are so relaxed that we are ready to buy a pig in a poke.” No aspect of eighteenth-century England (or human nature in general) is off limits to Swift. He takes what is familiar and makes it foreign. The normal becomes the absurd. He presents a characteristic as sensible, then proceeds to render it senseless.

When discussing Gulliver’s Travels, I’ve often found that no one can agree upon its ultimate message. Is it to lampoon eighteenth-century politics and corruption? To mock the Enlightenment’s devotion to reason and science? Or to show that we’re simply all Yahoos?

On the surface, Gulliver’s Travels is a simple adventure story. But, as one peels back the layers of irony, they’ll find a captivating and complex satire. Having never gone out of print, Gulliver’s Travels has continued to vex readers for over 280 years.

See what all the fuss is about: pick up Gulliver’s Travels and more with Noet’s Select Works of Jonathan Swift. They’re still on Community Pricing—bid now!

Jane Austen examines the relationship between society and literature

Jane Austen is best known for her ironic humor and satire of the British upper class. In Pride and Prejudice, her most popular novel, Austen’s sharp wit is directed toward nineteenth-century English society’s preoccupation with marriage—especially making a “socially advantageous” match.

why-read-satire-noet-jane-austenCheck out the book’s first sentence:

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”

In the midst of writing and revising Pride and Prejudice, Austen completed Northanger Abbey, an ironic parody of the sensational Gothic novels that were so popular during her time. Parody—imitating the style of another composition for comical effect—when used to critique, can be an effective vehicle for satire.

In Austen’s parody, the main character, Catherine, loves Gothic novels—the haunted castles, brooding villains, and pale-faced heroines. During her stay at Northanger Abbey, Catherine confuses real life with fiction, expecting the happenings at the abbey to parallel a Gothic novel. She’s in the correct setting—shouldn’t the characters and plot follow? This is especially well illustrated when Catherine believes to have found a secret document:

Her greedy eye glanced rapidly over a page. She started at its import. Could it be possible, or did not her senses play her false? An inventory of linen, in coarse and modern characters seemed all that was before her! . . . Nothing could now be clearer than the absurdity of her recent fancies. To suppose that a manuscript of many generations back could have remained undiscovered in a room such as that, so modern, so habitable! or that she should be the first to possess the skill of unlocking a cabinet. . . .

As Catherine attempts to find the extraordinary in the ordinary, she misidentifies the true threats to her well-being—a false friend, a man obsessed with wealth, and her own naiveté.

Throughout the work, Austen masterfully builds tension and suspense—hallmarks of the Gothic novel—yet, when we peer into the shadows, instead of discovering ghostly apparitions, we find real life. Just like Catherine, we’ve been misdirected by our expectations.

More than just a comic parody, Northanger Abbey is a novel about the relationship between fiction and reality. Austen illustrates that literature’s impact on our worldview is not to be underestimated.

Good news—we’re building a Noet edition of Jane Austen’s novels! Pick up Northanger Abbey and Austen’s other works at the best price.

Charles Dickens crusades against injustice

why-read-satire-noet-charles-dickensFamous for his memorable characters and concern for the marginalized, Charles Dickens skillfully used satire to call for reform. Dickens himself was no stranger to injustice. When his family fell upon hard times, culminating in his father being sent to debtors’ prison, 12-year-old Charles was forced to leave school and work in a boot-blacking factory. Later, when reflecting on his life, Dickens marveled at the depth of society’s apathy, wondering “how I could have been so easily cast away at such an age.”

Among the most famous of Dickens’ works is Bleak House. In this novel, he satirizes a society that is hopelessly indifferent to the human need for empathy, vividly setting the scene with the novel’s first paragraph:

London. Michaelmas Term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln’s Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets, as if the waters had but newly retired from the face of the earth, and it would not be wonderful to meet a Megalosaurus, forty feet long or so, waddling like an elephantine lizard up Holborn-hill. Smoke lowering down from chimney-pots, making a soft black drizzle, with flakes of soot in it as big as full-grown snow-flakes—gone into mourning, one might imagine, for the death of the sun. . . .

why-read-satire-noet-2By introducing the image of a Megalosaurus on London’s streets, Dickens recalls an archaic and brutish era. From his point of view, society is woefully out of touch with humanity, steadily sinking into the slime of prehistory.

According to American writer and literary critic Edmund Wilson, “Of all the Victorian novelists, [Dickens] was probably the most antagonistic to the Victorian age itself.”  Dickens’ novels consistently address the struggles of the poor in nineteenth-century England. Through his masterful portrayals of apathy, greed, and (on a brighter note) the true potential for human goodness, Dickens helped raise awareness and inspire change.

Today, Dickens continues to captivate readers, providing unique insight into the lives of those living on the fringes of Victorian society.

Dickens’ most influential works—including Bleak House—are currently on Community Pricing. Place your bid now!

Study satire with the best research tools for the best price

Jonathan Swift, Jane Austen, and Charles Dickens all employed satire as a clever way to inform and challenge the popular beliefs of their times. Due to their skillful storytelling and timeless themes, their monuments of wit have remained popular and relevant to today’s readers.

With Noet’s smart texts, you can examine satire with unparalleled depth. Compare and contrast Dickens’ influential works, scrolling side by side. Find every mention of “marriage” in Jane Austen’s novels with a single search. Make notes, highlight key phrases, and sync them across devices as you examine Gulliver’s Travels.

Select Works of Jonathan Swift, the Collected Works of Jane Austen, and Select Works of Charles Dickens are all on Community Pricing—bid now!

Then, continue building your library at Noet.com.

 

Romans, Now Available in High Definition

high-definition-commentary-romansRomans is Paul’s longest and most important epistle. The letter is filled with significant passages, as Paul unpacks the transformative nature of the gospel. But digging into the text can be pretty daunting if you’re not a Greek-language expert. All sorts of important details and interpretive cues could be lying beneath the surface.

Like a high-definition television brings out all of the visual details in your favorite movie, the High Definition Commentary: Romans brings out all of the linguistic details in this letter. The newest volume in this highly acclaimed series just shipped last week. You can get both the Philippians and the Romans volumes for 15% off using coupon code HIGHDEFCOM at checkout.

Study Romans and share it, too

The High Definition Commentaries are excellent study tools to help you cut through the technical jargon and understand the original Greek text. They also equip you to share your newfound understanding, as the rhetorical devices Paul uses are explained using modern English. We’ve also included over 120 custom-designed graphics that help you visually engage the text.

Here’s what author Steve Runge has to say:

See what others are saying

We also sent advance review copies of the High Definition Commentary: Romans to a few prominent scholars. Here’s what they have to say about it:

Steve Runge is not only one of the pioneers of discourse analysis of the Greek New Testament, but he is also a pioneer of a new type of New Testament commentary: one that is built on the rigorous observations of discourse analysis, and yet is packaged in a very accessible manner to be used by anyone wanting a helpful guide through the text. Alongside informed and insightful handling of the Epistle to the Romans, this commentary includes helpful images, illustrations, and applications, all of which will benefit preacher and general Bible reader alike.

—Constantine R. Campbell, PhD, associate professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

Romans can be daunting for students. What is Paul saying and how do we understand it? We can be thankful to Runge for providing us with a discourse analysis of the letter which is accessible to the ordinary person. The many slides in the book also assist us in grasping what Paul is up to in the letter. Runge’s work on Romans will be helpful to scholars, preachers and teachers, and students of the scriptures.

—Tom Schreiner, James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation, associate dean, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Steve Runge presents a learned and helpful study of Paul’s letter to the Romans. It is a visually stimulating work where Paul’s thoughts are literally mapped out in front of you. Runge successfully shows the reader how Paul’s argument in the letter is put together on one block after another. It is a great tool for anyone who is serious about teaching Romans!

—Michael F. Bird, PhD, University of Queensland, lecture in theology at Ridley College

The High Definition Commentaries are a one-of-a-kind Bible resource. Get both the Philippians and Romans volumes for 15% off with coupon code HIGHDEFCOM at checkout.

This coupon code expires soon, so order today!

Josh McDowell on What Proclaim Can Do for You

Josh McDowell is an apologist, evangelist, and writer recognized by Christians worldwide. Since 1960, McDowell has written or coauthored 138 books. He has also spoken to more than 25 million people, giving over 26,000 talks in 125 countries.

McDowell cares deeply about communicating the power of God’s love to all people. We had the chance to sit down with him and talk about Proclaim Church Presentation Software:

Try Proclaim for 30 days

Proclaim lives in the cloud, so you can collaborate with your team from wherever they work best. No more emailing large files or fumbling with flash drives. Best of all, it connects with many of the tools you already use, like Planning Center Online, CCLI SongSelect, Logos Bible Software, and Graceway Media.

Proclaim also comes loaded with more than $1,000.00 worth of first-class art, so you can start building engaging church presentations today.

Try it for free at ProclaimOnline.com/Download.

Pastor Appreciation Month: Get Huge Discounts

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“Remember your leaders, those who spoke to you the word of God. Consider the outcome of their way of life, and imitate their faith.” —Hebrews 13:7

As Pastor Appreciation Month continues, so do the savings. The month is halfway through, which means many of the deals are live!

Go to our Pastor Appreciation Month page to see today’s deals.

Deal of the day: sneak peek

Here’s a look at upcoming daily deals:

Day 15 (tomorrow!): J.A. Broadus Preaching Collection (3 vols.) 
Broadus was a master of both clarity in communication and sympathy with his audience. In this collection, you’ll discover not only his instructions for effective preaching, but also the text of 21 sermons and addresses he delivered. His History of Preaching is a fascinating guided tour of preaching practices, trends, highlights, and low points, from Old Testament figures through his own contemporaries.

Day 16: NavPress Spiritual Formation Collection (15 vols.)
This collection biblically and practically presents numerous spiritual disciplines that can transform your heart, mind, body, soul, and social life. It’s a comprehensive how-to for changing your complacent behavior, analyzing your heart’s intent, and transforming your life to an intentional pursuit of an authentic relationship with Christ.

Day 17: Welwyn Commentary Series (53 vols.)
Dedicated to the practical exposition and exhortation of Scripture, the 53-volume Welwyn Commentary Series contains over 13,000 pages of commentaries designed for pastoral ministry and preaching. Combining exegesis, hermeneutics, history, and pastoral insight, these scholarly resources are carefully crafted to meet the day-to-day needs of pastors as they grapple with the Word of God.

Day 18: Works of R.A. Torrey Collection (26 vols.)
Find nourishment for your mind and food for your soul as you explore the Bible’s details with the 26-volume Works of R.A. Torrey Collection. Torrey is one the great evangelists of our time, with an eye for exegesis and the practical wisdom of a seasoned servant.

Get your free book

Download The Practical Works of the Rev. Richard Baxter, vol. 14 for free the entire month!

Thank your leaders

It’s not too late to honor those who labor in the gospel for us. Take time to do something special for them this month—big or small, it makes a difference! Rake their leaves, walk their dogs, make a delicious casserole for their family to enjoy—the possibilities are endless. Pray for and bless those who give their time and energy to you and spreading the gospel.

Don’t miss a single deal—sign up to hear about every Pastor Appreciation deal. Plus, get 30 days of Proclaim Church Presentation Software for free!




What do you most appreciate about your pastor? Tell us in the comments!

Logos 5 Update: Smart Selection

Logos 5Late on Sunday, October 26, we will be pushing out a massive update to many of our major resources.

This update, due to its large size, will take quite a bit of time to download, depending on the size of your library.

Due to the change in these resources, your software will also have to index when finished with the update. It might be a good idea to start your software first thing Monday morning and let Logos begin to update and organize your library.

This update will allow a significant number of your resources to work with the new smart-selection feature. Smart selection is a new Logos 5 feature that will autoselect clauses, sentences, and sometimes even paragraphs as you start to select them from a resource. Once you move beyond a single word or a couple of sentences, Logos finishes selecting the logical phrase or paragraph that would match your selection.

The purpose of smart selection is to simply make it faster and easier to select the text you want. It changes the behavior of the normal click + drag selection from only selecting the characters you drag over to detecting the words, clauses, sentences, and paragraphs that you show the intention of selecting.

For example, in the sentence “I am testing Logos 5’s new feature.” selecting the “e” and “w” in “new” will select the entire word “new” (reaching the end of a word will select the beginning of the word as well). Selecting the “e,” “w,” and “f” in “new feature” will select both full words, and dragging into any other words will instantly select those whole words as well. Whenever you pass a word, phrase, sentence, or paragraph boundary, it begins selecting at that level.

Holding the Alt key (or Option for Mac) will allow normal selection, and Alt + right click (or Option + click for Mac) will select the word’s logical cluster. This feature will be enabled on all Logos 5 software, but if you want to check and be sure, just go to your program settings under the tools menu and check and see if the smart selection feature is set to “yes.”

Because this feature is so great, it takes a lot of data on the back end to make it work. Therefore, we will be implementing these updates late on October 26 to cause as little inconvenience as possible. Thank you for your patience!

Logos 5: Attach Notes to Verses

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I recently received a question from a Logos user that I answer frequently, so I want to address it again. The question was basically this:

My understanding is when I create a note for a verse, the note indicator is to appear next to that verse in all of my Bibles. However, I’m only seeing the indicator in the Bible in which I first created the note. What’s happening?

This is a very common scenario, so we’ll patiently walk through it from the beginning.

Let’s imagine we’re going to study the book of Mark, verse by verse. As we gain insights, we want to record them in a notes document next to the corresponding verses. In addition, we want those notes to appear in all of our Bibles.

Here’s how to accomplish that task:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the file something like Mark Notes (A)
  • Open any Bible to Mark 1:1 (B)

morris-proctor-attach-notes-to-verses-1-open-bible

  • Right click any word in Mark 1:1 (C)
  • Select Reference Mark 1:1 (THIS IS THE KEY: You must choose Reference so the note will attach to that verse regardless of the Bible you’re in. If you choose Selection “the word”, the note is only attached to that word in that Bible.) (D)
  • Select Add a note to “Mark Notes” (E)

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Notice what just happened:

  • A note named Mark 1:1 was created in the notes document (F)
  • A note indicator was placed next to Mark 1:1 in the Bible (G)

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  • The note indicator will appear in all versified books, primarily Bibles and commentaries, containing an entry for Mark 1:1 (H)

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  • Add Content for the Mark 1:1 note (I)

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  • Repeat these steps for each verse as you move through Mark (J)

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  • Close the notes document, but notice the indicators remain in the Bible (K)
  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to preview the note’s content (L)

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  • Click the indicator to open the notes document

By following these steps, at the end of your research you’ll basically have a personal study Bible for Mark that will be saved and synchronized across your various devices.

If you enjoyed this, check out our other training materials for more helpful hints.