Video Tutorial: Biblical Places – Dynamic Maps

Video Tutorial

One phenomenal feature of Biblical Places is the capturing of actual geographic coordinates for as many biblical locations as possible. As you place your mouse over different areas of the maps in Biblical Places, you can actually see the exact longitude and latitude in the upper right hand corner. A simple click on the provided link and you can see those coordinates as they exist now in Google Maps!

Another great feature in Biblical Places is the ability to measure distances by pressing Ctrl and left clicking/dragging from one place on the map to another.

Biblical Places really opens up the geography of the biblical world to you. No longer is your biblical atlas a tool that you interact with passively, but it is powerful tool that you can manipulate and control to grasp the significance geography plays in biblical events.

Logos Bible College Scholarship

Several months ago we created a Seminary Scholarship site, offering 3 seminary students per year a $1,000.00 tuition scholarship and a copy of Scholar’s Library. Upon launching it, we received numerous requests to start a similar program for those students attending a Bible College.
I’m happy to announce that, today, we’re launching a Bible College Scholarship program!
If you attend a Bible College or Christian Undergraduate University, then this scholarship is for you. Three times a year we’ll be giving away a $1,000.00 tuition scholarship plus a copy of Logos Scholar’s Library. The application process is simple, and takes less than 15 minutes to complete. So head over and apply now.

Sharing is Caring

With most scholarships, you typically don’t want to tell your friends about it because the more applicants there are, the less chance you have of winning. With our Bible College Scholarship, the exact opposite is true. The more of your friends who apply, the greater chance you have of being awarded the scholarship!
Everyone who fills out an application is asked how they heard about the scholarship. If a person puts your name in as the one who referred them to the site and they win the scholarship, then we’ll give you the scholarship too!
Not only do you have the chance to win a great Bible College Scholarship, you can help others win it too!

Not a Bible College Student? We Need Your Help

The only way we can continue this scholarship program is if you help us spread the word about it. Please take a moment and share about the scholarship on Facebook and Twitter. Also, if you know any Bible College students personally, please send them an email or give them a call to let them know about this great opportunity.

What Does it mean to “Know God?”

According to the Washington Post, 92% percent of America answered that they believed in God when asked. However believing and knowing God are two totally separate things. Knowing God consist more than just believing that he exists, but actually having an interest in obeying His commands, giving Him glory and worshiping Him for life. Calvin writes on this matter;

By the knowledge of God, I understand that by which we not only conceive that there is some God, but also apprehend what it is for our interest, and conducive to his glory, what, in short, it is befitting to know concerning him. For, properly speaking, we cannot say that God is known where there is no religion or piety. I am not now referring to that species of knowledge by which men, in themselves lost and under curse, apprehend God as a Redeemer in Christ the Mediator. I speak only of that simple and primitive knowledge, to which the mere course of nature would have conducted us, had Adam stood upright. For although no man will now, in the present ruin of the human race, perceive God to be either a father, or the author of salvation, or propitious in any respect, until Christ interpose to make our peace; still it is one thing to [Read more…]

Logos 4: Locate Occurrences of an Original Word or Strong’s Number

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

I have received numerous e-mails asking, “Where is the Englishman’s Concordance in Logos 4?” Just to be sure you know what I’m referring to, the Englishman’s Concordance was a special search feature in Libronix 3 that located every occurrence of a Strong’s number (which represented a Hebrew or Greek word) in the Bible.

So if you have been wondering this yourself, here is the answer: the name Englishman’s Concordance does not appear in Logos 4, but the functionality does:

  • Open a Bible with the reverse interlinear option (currently ESV, NRSV, KJV, NKJKV, NASB, and NLT)
  • Right click on a word in a verse
  • From the right menu, select Lemma “your word” OR Strong’s “your number”
  • Select Search this resource

There before your eyes will be every occurrence of that word or number! When doing word studies, this is a valuable search so that you can compare Scripture with Scripture.

The Support of Free Will Refuted

Absurd fictions of opponents first refuted, and then certain passages of Scripture explained. Answer by a negative. Confirmation of the answer, Calvin writes;

Enough would seem to have been said on the subject of man’s will, were there not some who endeavour to urge him to his ruin by a false opinion of liberty, and at the same time, in order to support their own opinion, assail ours. First, they gather together some absurd inferences, by which they endeavour to bring odium upon our doctrine, as if it were abhorrent to common sense, and then they oppose it with certain passages of Scripture (infra, sec. 6). Both devices we shall dispose of in their order. If sin, say they, is necessary, it ceases to be sin; if it is voluntary, it may be avoided. Such, too, were the weapons with which Pelagius assailed Augustine. But we are unwilling to crush them by the weight of his name, until we have satisfactorily disposed of the objections themselves. I deny, therefore, that sin ought to be the less imputed because [Read more…]

An Interview with John Bolt about Herman Bavinck

John Bolt

The electronic edition of Reformed Dogmatics, by Herman Bavinck is nearing completion on the Pre-Pub page, so I thought I thought I’d take this opportunity to share an email exchange I recently had with Dr. John Bolt, the editor of the new English translation. Dr. Bolt is Professor of Systematic Theology at Calvin Theological Seminary and has served as a pastor for several years. He is a member of the Dutch Translation Society, which produced the new translation. Part one is below, and part two will appear on the blog next week.

Remember, you still have a little more time to get Bavinck’s Reformed Dogmatics, so head on over to the Pre-Pub page to place your order!

Who was Herman Bavinck?

Herman Bavinck was the son of Jan Bavinck, a preacher in the Dutch Reformed Succession Churches, a fellowship characterized by deep piety, practical Christianity, and traditional orthodox Reformed theology.

He was an extraordinarily gifted student who scandalized his own church by attending the very modern theological faculty at the University of Leiden where he earned a doctorate, writing a dissertation on the ethics of Swiss Reformer Ulrich Zwingli. As a student he became familiar with the work of Abraham Kuyper, the church reformer, journalist, statesman, who dominated Dutch life in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Both men taught theology—Kuyper at the Free University of Amsterdam, and Bavinck at the Kampen theological school of the Secession church and from 1902 on as Kuyper’s successor at the Free University. While Bavinck did public service in the First Chamber (Senate) of the Dutch Parliament, he was the “theologian’s theologian” for the Dutch neo-Calvinist movement. His major work, Reformed Dogmatics, is remarkable for its solid biblical base, its incorporation of the church’s long history of biblical interpretation and dogma formation, and its constant address to modern questions in the natural sciences and in the new field of psychology.

What is the mission and role of the Dutch Translation Society in translating the works of Bavinck and other theologians?

Truthfully, Bavinck was the only one of sufficient importance to warrant translating his entire 4-volume magnum opus. One cannot understand the developments in Dutch Reformed theology of the twentieth century (Berkouwer, Van Ruler, Hendrikus Berkhof, and others) apart from a first hand acquaintance with Bavinck.

He is still fresh and relevant because he takes seriously the intellectual and social challenges of modernity. Many of the questions of his day in Europe still haunt us today and he provides a sure guide.

Our translation society is a truly ecumenical venture that draws support from at least five different churches in the Reformed tradition. Bavinck is one of the few figures to which all of those traditions turn for guidance.

Reformed Dogmatics

The translation project took a decade to complete. Can you describe the process? What was your role in the translation and editorial process?

When we started the project, we had enough money to do a segment of Reformed Dogmatics. Though we were all enthusiastic about the translation, we really did not know if the work would sell. So we started modestly. We began with the eschatology section in volume 4 because of its size and the currency of its subject matter. The result: The Last Things: Hope for this World and the Next, first published by Baker in 1996.

The volume was well-received. We had generous benefactors, and next produced the creation section of Volume 2: In the Beginning: Foundations of Creation Theology, which Baker published in 1999.

At that point support was growing sufficiently for us to commit to doing the entire four volumes. The last one was published in 2008. John Vriend was the translator of the text. I received the typed manuscripts as he completed his work, and I went to work editing.

My editorial work consisted of bringing the scholarly apparatus up to speed to twenty-first century standards. This meant getting the full bibliographic information, checking versions and editions, and—where possible—substituting the English text (eg. Schleiermacher’s Christian Faith) where Bavinck had cited the Dutch or German.

I am deeply indebted to the list of Calvin Seminary students whose names are listed at the beginning of the bibliographies in each volume. They checked editions, found obscure periodicals, and more. My final editorial work was to provide sub-headings internal to each chapter, where they were completely absent in the original, and to prepare a précis for each chapter to help readers navigate lengthy arguments.

You write in the introduction to Bavinck’s Prolegomena in volume 1 that “the Gereformeerd Dogmatiek represents the concluding high point of some four centuries of remarkably productive Dutch Reformed theological reflection,” including “Voetius, De Moor, Vitringa, van Mastricht, Witsius, and Walaeus.” How does Bavinck both reflect and develop the theological system of his predecessors?

All you have to do is look at the footnotes in the Reformed Dogmatics to see how well Bavinck knew that tradition and used it. Nonetheless, he excels them in his desire to reach out to the universal religious impulse in all people in order to connect it with the specific Christian gospel. If you look at any of the loci you will see how he often begins with, let’s say, “sacrifice” as a general human religious reality, and moves from there to Christian revelation. It is that move which marks him as a truly modern theologian, interested in and addressing modern questions.

The remainder of the interview will appear on the blog next week. Remember, you still have a little more time to get Reformed Dogmatics while it’s on Pre-Pub. The print set normally retails for $179.95, but right now you can pre-order it for $99.95. We plan on shipping this set very soon, so you still have a little more time left to get this deal when you pre-order. Lock in your order now!

What Caused the Fall of Adam?

Every evangelical knows of the fall of mankind, but what did that have to do with you or me? Why would have Adam’s fall, better yet how could have one single piece of fruit have such infliction and such vengeance on the whole of human race? John Calvin helps explain exactly what happen at the fall and its implications to humanity saying;

As the act which God punished so severely must have been not a trivial fault, but a heinous crime, it will be necessary to attend to the peculiar nature of the sin which produced Adam’s fall, and provoked God to inflict such fearful vengeance on the whole human race. The common idea of sensual intemperance is childish. The sum and substance of all virtues could not consist in abstinence from a single fruit amid a general abundance of every delicacy that could be desired, the earth, with happy fertility, yielding not only abundance, but also endless variety. We must, therefore, look deeper than sensual intemperance. The prohibition to touch the tree of the knowledge of good and evil was a trial of obedience, that Adam, by observing it, might prove [Read more…]

The “Network Effect”

AlexanderGrahamBellI would love to have been there when Alexander Graham Bell experienced his great “a-ha” moments. His first “a-ha” might have gone something like this, “Oh no. . . I gotta make two of these things!” Can you then picture Al showing off the first pair of telephones to friends and dignitaries who ask the questions, “Do you have to have two phones and a different set of wires for each person you speak to? Where are you going to run the wires? What do you mean, ‘switchboard’?”

Recently I was speaking with a friend who likened Logos Bible Software to the Amazon Kindle and the Sony e-Reader. His point was that we all represented similar abilities to read digital books. Our new iPhone app reinforced his analogy. I pointed out that his perspective was only true to a point. E-book readers have much in common with printed books: They are convenient, hand-held, self-contained, and portable. They are little more than a book that runs on batteries. They go beyond the printed book by serving as vending machines for additional books. But while they have some endearing features, they still only represent basic paper book utility: reading words on pages. With Logos Bible Software, reading words on pages is just the beginning.

Just as the utility of a telephone increases relative to the number of other telephones it is connected to, the value of each Logos book increases relative to the number of books and data sets it references. Logos books are worth more than 100% of the paper book utility. The quantity and quality of explicitly “tagged” links along with word, phrase, topic, and reference links and the sheer size of the Logos Bible Software formatted book count create a network effect dramatically superior to the utility of any individual or collection of stand-alone digital books. Stand-alone digital books are the raw ingredients of Logos Bible Software, not the end product.

A commentary linked to a Bible, linked to a dictionary, linked to an atlas, linked to each of the other books in the library offers a multiplier network effect to the value of every single book. Every combination of books is greater than the sum of the books. The network effect is seen clearly in telephones, radio, TV, Facebook, the human genome, and yes, Logos Bible Software.

One way of measuring this network effect is Metcalfe’s law:

Metcalfe’s law states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system (n2). . . . Metcalfe’s law characterizes many of the network effects of communication technologies and networks such as the Internet, social networking, and the World Wide Web.

And I would suggest it also applies to linked books in the Logos Bible Software.

Let x equal the value of one book. Linked together in a network,

  • Two books = 4x
  • Three books = 9x
  • Four books = 16x

A thousand–volume Logos Bible Software Library has the utility of a million stand-alone resources and the convenience of your desktop, laptop, or your iPhone/iPad!

Logos 4.0c Is Now Available

It’s been six months since we shipped Logos 4, and today we’re releasing our third significant update to the Windows software. Version 4.0c, which will be available later today as a free download, brings many new features and improvements and fixes lots of little bugs. If you have automatic updating enabled (screenshot), which is the default setting, Logos 4 will notify you that updates are ready to be installed.

When you see the balloon tooltip window, right-click on the Logos icon in your system tray and choose to “Install update” (screenshot). If Logos 4 hasn’t downloaded the update by the end of the day and you just can’t wait any longer to get your hands on the latest release, type Update Now into the command bar (screenshot). This will force Logos 4 to check for any available updates (screenshot) and begin downloading them.

What’s New in 4.0c?

There are hundreds of changes in 4.0c. Here are the two biggest ones:

  1. Legacy Reverse Interlinear Display: In Logos 4 we introduced a new layout for reverse interlinears. Most of you loved it, but some preferred the previous layout where the Greek or Hebrew text was directly below the English text. So we’ve decided to add it back in as an option (screenshot). Just click on “Display” and choose which lines you’d like to appear. You can use it along with or instead of the new-style reverse interlinear display.
  2. Passage Lists: Save your Bible search results as Passage Lists, which were called Verse Lists in version 3 (screenshot). There’s also a command to import Passage Lists from version 3 into version 4. Use “Import Passage Lists” to import just the Passage Lists, or use “Import All” to import Passage Lists, Highlighting, Notes, Favorites, and Prayer Lists. One cool new feature of Passage Lists in version 4 is that you can merge lists to get the union, intersection, difference, or symmetric difference or multiple lists.

To see a complete list of the changes in 4.0c, check out the support article “What’s New in Logos 4.0c.”

Time to Upgrade to Logos 4?

If you’ve been cautiously watching from the sidelines, waiting for the right opportunity to make the switch to Logos 4, now’s your chance. Logos 4 is better than ever. It’s had more than six months of extensive testing by thousands of users, and our team of developers has been fixing bugs, listening to user feedback, and adding some really cool new features.

There’s a lot more still planned. Version 4.0d is already underway, and we’re in the process of adding these additional features, as well as many others that we can’t tell you about yet.

There’s never been a better time to upgrade to Logos 4. It’s a powerful, stable, cutting-edge piece of software that just keeps getting better and better. Best of all, these regular updates don’t cost you a penny.

What about Logos 4 for Mac?

Progress on the Mac version of Logos 4 recently has been impressive. As Alpha 19.1 shows, it’s coming along quite nicely. We’ve doubled the size of our Mac development team, and they’re really cranking out new features at a fast pace. The consensus is that Logos 4 for Mac as an alpha is better than our previous generation software. So if you haven’t tried it yet, now might be a good time. Remember, you can safely use both Logos for Mac 1.2.2 and Logos 4 for Mac side by side. If you’re ready to help us test it, you can either upgrade your base package or download the core engine and start contributing in the Logos 4 for Mac forum.

What is the Sum of True Wisdom?

Wisdom is the quality of having experience, knowledge, and good judgment. But where does one find his or her’s wisdom in a day and age that seems to claim so many truths. John Calvin helps break down how the evil of man can still yet be used for the good things of God and how God uses that to lead His people to find Him.

Our wisdom, in so far as it ought to be deemed true and solid Wisdom, consists almost entirely of two parts: the knowledge of God and of ourselves. But as these are connected together by many ties, it is not easy to determine which of the two precedes and gives birth to the other. For, in the first place, no man can survey himself without forthwith turning his thoughts towards the God in whom he lives and moves; because it is perfectly obvious, that the endowments which we possess cannot possibly be from ourselves; nay, that our very being is nothing else than subsistence in God alone. In the second place, those blessings which unceasingly distil to us from heaven, [Read more…]