Chart the History of Western Thought Through Its Greatest Works

Great books of the western worldThe Great Books of the Western World
gives you instant access to the major ideas, stories, and discoveries that shaped Western culture. The 60 volumes contain 517 works written by 130 authors: Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Calvin, Pascal, Kant, Kierkegaard, Melville, Shakespeare, Dickens, Marx, Freud, and so many others. Pre-order now to get $50 off the collection’s normal Pre-Pub price.

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Get $100 When You Refer a Friend to Logos

Refer a friend, get $100
We believe amazing things happen when people study the Bible for themselves. That’s why we make the most advanced Bible study software in the world. You use Logos, so we know you share that same passion. We want to give you a chance to share what you love with your friends and family—and say thank you for making what we do possible.

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The Mobile Ed Sale Ends at Midnight Tonight

Mobile Ed Sale

Take advantage of this special offer from Mobile Ed by midnight tonight. Get 50% Off Moo, Bock, and Witherington in the Mobile Ed: Foundations Bundle and 15% off all Mobile Ed courses and collections.
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How to Filter the Information Flood with Logos

information overload
There is way too much information out there for you to ever read, let alone process and assimilate. I dare you to click the “Random Article” link on Wikipedia and see how many clicks it takes you to get to a topic you really know something about. It took me 41 clicks before I reached State highways in Virginia (I grew up there).
And that’s just the English version of Wikipedia. German took me 52 clicks (I got lucky); Spanish, 23 (super lucky); French, 48; and please don’t malign me for giving up on Polish before I began. 
Media Ecologists such as Neil PostmanMarshall McLuhan, and evangelicalism’s own T. David Gordon have observed/complained that the amount of available information in the modern West is actually an obstacle to knowledge. How can you determine which information is worth having as the flood rushes by? How can you make sense of the relationships of things when those things are constantly swirling around you?

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How to Organize Your Favorites in Logos

Organize Your Favorites in Logos

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Camp Logos alumnus recently emailed this question in reference to the Camp Logos 1 and 2 video resources:

As I go through and watch your videos from Camp Logos, is there a way for me to “star” or “tag” one that is particularly interesting to me so that I will know to go back and watch it again?

I responded by suggesting he use Favorites to organize videos he wanted to review. I’ll outline the steps below using Camp Logos videos as examples, but these steps apply equally to any chapters, articles, etc. from any Logos resources you want to organize and revisit.

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Resource Updates: September


Whenever a resource you own is updated, you’ll get that new content—for free—so your Logos library is always becoming more valuable and staying up to date with the latest improvements.

Here’s a list of Logos resources that were updated throughout September.

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3 Affordable Ways to Build a Powerful Wesleyan Library

Wesleyan and Methodists books and commentaries

We’re committed to providing top-notch biblical study materials across the broad spectrum of Christian denominations—and that includes the gamut of Wesley’s followers. So whether you’re Wesleyan, Holiness, Nazarene, United Methodist, Independent Methodist, Salvation Army, or any other variation, we’ve got a growing library of resources that will meet your needs.

Here are some great ways to bulk up your library of Methodist-Wesleyan resources.

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How to Instantly Spot NT Allusions to the OT

LogosPro_blogOne of the most illuminating things that can happen in your Bible reading is when a few of your neurons fire as they pick up a subtle allusion a New Testament author makes to the writings of an Old Testament one. There’s great value in making a connection like that. It’s like what N.T. Wright once said about metaphors, “Metaphor consists in bringing two sets of ideas close together, close enough for a spark to jump… so that the spark, in jumping, illuminates for a moment the whole area around, changing perceptions as it does so.”
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Original-Language Study for the Rest of Us

Explore biblical theologyLanguage is a funny thing. A single word can have many meanings, and many words can describe a single concept. In our native tongue, we usually have a pretty good grasp on which words we can use to express certain thoughts and ideas. But when we encounter languages that we haven’t spent a lifetime speaking and reading, our grasp on these words can slip.

In biblical studies, interacting with Hebrew and Greek is a necessity to understand the original context of the text. For students of these biblical languages or anyone without formal training, the original biblical languages can seem like barriers preventing them from fully understanding the Bible. Resources like the Hebrew–Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (HALOT) and the Greek English Lexicon of the New Testament and Early Christian Literature (BDAG) are geared toward intense academic work, which can make them less accessible to students and virtually inaccessible to anyone without formal training.

The Lexham Theological Wordbook makes this lexical information accessible for a broader audience. This resource is designed to make the original biblical languages accessible to people from all interest levels. Plus, it’s designed to work seamlessly with your Logos Bible Software library.

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Why Are Anglicans So Passionate about Reason?

anglican three legged stool

Recently on the blog, we examined the roles Scripture and tradition play in Anglican belief and practice. As I’ve said, these are two of the three main sources for Anglican theology, which I’ve referred to as the “three-legged stool.” Anglicans attempt to keep all three of these legs in balance so that the stool does not tip. The third leg of this stool is reason. As with tradition, reason does not trump Scripture; Scripture remains the first among equals.

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