Preaching Through the Bible in a Year

Sometimes you hear a story that just sticks in your mind. Like the one about the pastor who preached through the entire Bible in a year, with his congregation reading along at a rate of 20+ chapters per week.

If you haven’t already heard this yarn, check it out. With National Bible Week coming up later this month, it’s a good time to think about what would happen if more churches followed this pastor’s lead. And without spoiling the story, I should mention that Logos Bible Software plays a central role in assisting Pastor Bolender with his massive undertaking.

Here’s an excerpt to whet your appetite…the full story is in the Leadership Journal archive.

In 2002, our church began an ambitious project: If the congregation would take up daily Bible reading again, I would teach scriptural surveys that covered the passages they were reading. By year’s end, the congregation had read Genesis to Revelation, and I had taught 250 messages on all 66 books. I had to preach five times a week to keep up with the church (they were devouring 20-30 chapters a week), but a simple plan and some well-organized software enabled us to do it.

See also:

G’Day, Hebrew Syntax

You may have noticed I haven’t been blogging much lately. Mostly, I’ve been too busy working on the Andersen-Forbes Hebrew Syntax project. As part of that work, I recently went down to Melbourne, Australia to visit with Frank Andersen and Dean Forbes, the gentlemen themselves. It’s rare that the two of them are ever in the same room, since Dean lives in California and Frank lives half a world away in Melbourne. When we found out that Dean would be visiting Melbourne for a month to work with Frank, we decided that I should crash the party.*

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Moved In

Once we told the development teams they could move in, it didn’t take long.

At the front of the room is our web applications team and along the side is the application development team.

More Space

On December 20, 2004, there was a fire in the restaurant next door. It was around six hours between the time the fire started and when it finally set off the smoke alarms on our side of the building. The result was that the restaurant was completely destroyed; everything was smoked thoroughly. The partial second floor had to be demolished and even the brick walls had to be soda-blasted to remove the odor. A third of our offices were evacuated and carpets, books, and computers had to be thoroughly cleaned.

The restaurant relocated around the corner and Logos took the opportunity to create additional office space that could connect to our existing offices.

For ten months we endured the sounds (and smells!) of demolition and construction on the other side of a very thin wall. But today it is all worth it, because we are finally able to move in.

From the back, at the top of the old second floor. Skylight is above and right.

From the front, towards the back and skylight.

From the back of the new second floor at nearly the same position as the first photo.

Greek Syntax: Using Word Groups

Last week, I posted an article about “Word Groups” in the Syntactic Annotation. I promised some follow-up; and now it’s time for that.

There are obvious uses for this level of annotation in the realm of searching, but what about in just reading the text? Or in working through a passage exegetically?

The good news is that the visualization (graph) supports most operations you’re used to performing from a standard morphologically tagged Greek NT in Logos Bible Software. This article is about some of those options.

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Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East now a pre-pub!

Last month, I blogged about Adolf Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East. It was a Community Pricing project that was close but not close enough to becoming a real, bona-fide Logos project.

Well, folks responded. I’m thrilled! Deissman’s work is now an official, in-production Logos pre-pub.

What does this mean?

Well, it means if you got in on the community pricing, you’re confirmed and only paying $10 for this baby.

If you get in on it from this point onward, the lowest price you’ll pay is $19.95.

It also means that the book is under development, so the pre-pub is a foregone conclusion. If you missed out, hop on the pre-pub because the price could go up again.

Moral of the story: Check out the Community Pricing page and see if anything piques your interest, because Community Pricing just may be the cheapest way to get access to that book that looks interesting. Perhaps you’d be interested in Driver’s Notes on Samuel (a worthy tome to consider).

Semeia and Logos Bible Software

The journal Semeia is one that I’ve heard all sorts of things about. It is currently a pre-pub that is under development, which means that we’ve raised enough interest to produce it.

It is (as of first publication of this blog article) priced at $29.95. Not bad for 91 issues of a journal.

Just the other day, I was reading an essay by Jeffrey T. Reed in the Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period. The article was on the rhetoric of epistles (not necessarily NT epistles). And I noticed a footnote on pp. 172-173:

Cf. The epistolary definition of J.L. White, “The Greek Documentary Letter Tradition Third Century BC to Third Century AD”, Semeia 22 (1981), p. 91. Besides this primary function, the letter was used for a host of other purposes (e.g. letters of friendship, letters of praise and blame, letters of recommendation, letters of petition, and administrative letters).

Makes me want to read the article. When Semeia is available (hopefully soon!) in Logos Bible Software, I’ll be able to.

If you haven’t considered the Semeia pre-pub, but find stuff like the Theological Journal Library helpful, you may want to reconsider Semeia. It is cited in books, articles and essays, as this citation from Reed shows.

Biblical People

One of the neatest features supported in the next release of Logos Bible Software is the Biblical People database. It has been included in the alpha releases since the end of June, but I wanted to give everyone a chance to see it.

The example here shows a visualization of all of the biblically-attested relationships of Aaron. The graph shows everyone Aaron is related to and the nature of the relationship. Nodes in the graph are colored by gender, if known, and labeled by relationship. Every relationship is attested to by one or more Bible verses, shown at the left side of the graph. Clicking on a person’s name regenerates the graph with them at the center.

The graphs can be generated for any person in the Bible, and a specialized version of the graph is included in the Passage Guide to show all of the people in the selected passage and their relationships to each other.

Logos Bible Software is more than just an electronic version of a paper library. And it is tools like this that demonstrate how software can help you see and explore the Bible in ways you never could before.

Syntax Graphs & Sentence Diagrammer

Since Bob posted about the sentence diagrammer, I thought I’d follow that up just to let folks know that these groovy new syntax graphs we’re developing (see previous post) are able to be copied into the Sentence Diagrammer.

See? Click on each image to see what happens. The first image is a right-click and copy (the blue arrows and such indicate what is selected). The second image is the syntax graph pasted into the sentence diagrammer as a live object. Arrows are arrows; words are words. You can grab stuff and move it around.

Small disclaimer: The first graphic shows stuff like “add to general notes” on the right-click menu. At present, it is unclear whether we’ll support notes within these graph resources.

Greek Syntax: Word Groups

[Note: this is one in a series of posts on Greek syntax and Logos Bible Software. See the Greek category for a full listing. The immediately previous post is here.]

As mentioned in a previous post, the syntactic analysis consists of three primary levels of annotation:

  • Base Level Analysis (Word)
  • Word Group Analysis
  • Clause Analysis

This post will introduce you to the Word Group level of analysis. If this sort of stuff floats your boat, then read on.

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