How to Be Truly Free: Become a Slave of Christ

In the opening verse of his most famous letter, Paul tells us the first thing he wants us to know about him. Here’s the Holman Christian Standard Bible:

Paul, a slave of Christ Jesus. (Rom 1:1) (HCSB)

He is a slave to Jesus, the Jewish Messiah.

But there is some friendly debate over whether the Greek word being translated there should be rendered “servant” or “slave.” Here is the recent revision of the same translation, the Christian Standard Bible:

Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus. (Rom 1:1) (CSB)

Which one is right? [Read more…]

Have You Always Wanted to Learn Greek?

Is Greek easier than you think? Find out for yourself during a special Facebook Live session starting at 1:30 p.m. (PT) on Wednesday, November 8.

Dr. John Schwandt, executive director of Logos Mobile Education, will take your questions and explain the first steps to demystifying the original language of the New Testament through Faithlife’s new Interactive Greek Alphabet Course.

[Read more…]

Who Wrote the Book of Proverbs?


The first book of Proverbs announces, “These are the proverbs of Solomon, son of David, king of Israel” (compare Prov 10:1; 25:1). By its own testimony, though, the book of Proverbs had many authors: “These are the sayings of the wise [literally, wise ones]” (Prov 24:23). This same idea—that the proverbs in the book were written by a number of sages—is reiterated in Proverbs 1:6 and 22:17.

But old traditions die hard, and the authorship of these proverbs is still debated. What role did Solomon actually play in writing this Wisdom literature? [Read more…]

How to Use Inline Search to Find All Forms of a Word

At a recent Camp Logos an attendee asked this question:

Can we execute a Match all word forms search with an Inline search?

First, I’ll give a little explanation.

On the Search panel menu resides the option to Match all word forms. With this feature selected, a search for faith also finds faithful, faithfulness, etc.

An Inline Search, however, does not visibly have this option. No worries, though. An Inline Search uses what was last checked or unchecked on the Search panel menu. [Read more…]

Not Your Average Wordbook


The Lexham Theological Wordbook is a new breed of language tool, one built for any student of the Bible. Craig Bartholomew explains:

In a day in which seminaries and universities are loosening their hold on the biblical languages Lexham Press is boldly leading the way towards a constructive and thoroughly contemporary retrieval. The Lexham Theological Wordbook is a marvelous resource for scholars, pastors, seminarians, and for those whose knowledge of the biblical languages is limited. Scripture is given to us in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek, and we need this sort of help in excavating its riches. This Wordbook is based on the best current linguistic insights and will be a resource that I keep close at hand. The Wordbook is an ambitious and major achievement and should and will be used widely.

[Read more…]

November’s Top 5 Theology Deals

Looking for a great book in theology or biblical studies? We’ve pulled together 50 resources you’ll love on everything from C.S. Lewis to archaeology. And you can get them for up to 50% off! It’s all a part of November’s monthly sale.

Check out everything on sale this month, and don’t miss these top five theology deals:

[Read more…]

Publisher Spotlight: Save 30% (and More!) on Mobile Ed Courses and Bundles

Save at least 30% this month on video classes from Logos Mobile Education, all lit up in November’s Publisher Spotlight. Here’s a peek at the bundles and individual classes on sale. [Read more…]

Free This Month: Experience a Video Course on the Historical Jesus

Free Book of the Month November

“Who do people say that I am?”

Learn how the ancient world answered the Lord’s question with this month’s Free Book of the Month. This time, though, the free book is much more than a book: it’s a 1-hour video course. During November you can experience NT313 Jesus and the Witness of the Outsiders from Logos Mobile Education, at no charge. [Read more…]

Coming Soon: Two New Lexham Bible Guides

Since the first volume was released five years ago, the Lexham Bible Guides have become some of our most popular resources. The series has grown to cover the entire Pauline corpus and two volumes on Genesis. Now, two new volumes are on the horizon: Jonah and 1 Peter. Both of these volumes should be released before the end of the year—and now is your last chance to take advantage of the pre-order discount.

The Lexham Bible Guides are designed to do all the work of searching through commentaries, journal articles, and monographs to find the information you need, saving you valuable time by curating all of the best literature in one place.

Get answers to tough questions

The Lexham Bible Guides don’t just present you with raw research data. The curated and annotated notes on the various viewpoints and interpretive options within the text allow you to quickly synthesize a broad range of views on a particular passage. Dense, jargon-filled research is distilled into easy-to-understand comments. Each volume gives you the tools you need to find answers quickly.

For example, the book of Jonah presents a number of interpretive challenges that could be illuminated by a plethora of viewpoints. Let’s look at how scholarship has handled the great fish that swallowed Jonah. Here are three perspectives (among many) presented in the Lexham Bible Guide:

  • Allen (1976, 213) says God snatches his servant from death’s clutches at the last moment. The fish represents Yahweh’s grace, and the incident demonstrates his power over the sea and its creatures. He considers the significance of “three days and three nights” to be uncertain, though he discusses several proposals. (NICOT: The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah)
  • Ellison (1986, 374–75) considers “three days and three nights” to be an approximation. He thinks we should ask why God chose the fish and not some floating wreckage to save Jonah: “Miracle is not the gratuitous display of God’s omnipotence, nor is it called out merely because of human need. Taken in its setting, it is probable that every miracle has a spiritual significance hence the use of ‘sign’ to describe it in John.” He contends that, for the book’s original audience, the fish represents Leviathan (see, Pss. 74:13–14; 104:25). The fish itself is secondary, but it demonstrated to the prophet that God’s love is operative in a world under divine control. (The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Volume 7: Daniel and the Minor Prophets)
  • Page (1995, 239–42) discusses why God chose the fish as the way to return Jonah. He seems to prefer the theory that the belly of the fish was a “good place to learn” given Jonah’s awareness of the significance of Leviathan in the Old Testament (Pss. 74:13–14; 104:26). Page considers various options for the meaning of “three days and three nights” and concludes that “no compelling reason exists to disbelieve the literal span of time indicated. In fact, none of the Old Testament allusions of a similar nature are necessarily figurative. The major point is that God, through the fish, could sustain this pouting prophet during ‘unbelievable’ circumstances and return him to the place where he could renew his commission to serve.” (NAC: Amos, Obadiah, Jonah)

We have three perspectives that emphasize God’s sovereign power over nature, each with their own unique analysis on the biblical account. And if you have any of those commentaries referenced in the Bible Guide, you’ll be able to navigate directly to the relevant section in them with the inline links.

Save time and money

Jumpstart your research. Pre-order Lexham Bible Guide: Jonah and Lexham Bible Guide: 1 Peter today!

Kevin Vanhoozer on How Confessions of Faith Affect Christian Living


Our Logos Mobile Education crew met up with Kevin Vanhoozer of Trinity Evangelical Divinity near Chicago to film a new course on doctrine and discipleship: Theological Interpretation of Scripture in the Church. While we were there, we discussed a new project he’s been working on—A Reforming Catholic Confession—and also asked: How do confessions of faith affect Christian living? Here’s what Vanhoozer had to say. [Read more…]