Oldie But Goodie

The Expositor's Greek Testament (5 Vols.)Sometimes older works get replaced by newer ones and have little enduring value—assuming one has access to the newer works. Others stand the test of time. Such is the case with The Expositor’s Greek Testament (EGT), which was later reprinted and retitled as The Expositor’s Greek New Testament (EGNT), though most still refer to it without the New.

Even though it is more than a century old, many still think it belongs in the libraries of students of Scripture. The Master’s Seminary includes it with an asterisk in their “850 Books for Biblical Expositors.”

World-renown New Testament scholar D. A. Carson, who doesn’t hesitate to say when he thinks that a book has little value, thinks it unfortunate that this set is out of print and maintains that even though dated, “the five volumes of the old Expositor’s Greek New Testament are still worth owning and reading, along with more recent works” (New Testament Commentary Survey, 5th ed., 22, 64).

A search in Libronix for “Expositor’s Greek Testament” OR “Expositor’s Greek New Testament” returns more than 1,600 hits in many Bible and theological dictionaries and encyclopedias, hundreds of the theological journals, and a host of New Testament commentaries.

The EGT, which was edited by William Robertson Nicoll, covers in 3,342 pages the entire New Testament. It features contributions from A. B. Bruce (Synoptic Gospels), Marcus Dods (John and Hebrews), R. J. Knowling (Acts), James Denney (Romans), G. G. Findlay (1 Corinthians), J. H. Bernard (2 Corinthians), Frederic Rendall (Galatians), S. D. F. Salmond (Ephesians), H. A. A. Kennedy (Philippians), A. S. Peake (Colossians), James Moffatt (Thessalonians and Revelation), J. D. White (Timothy and Titus), W. E. Oesterley (Philemon and James), J. H. A. Hart (1 Peter), R. H. Strachan (2 Peter), David Smith (John’s Letters), and J. B. Mayor (Jude).

Place your pre-order to help this oldie but goodie make it back into the libraries of biblical expositors.

You may also want to check out The Expositor’s Bible, also edited by William Robertson Nicoll.

The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity

Today’s blog post was written by Kirk Fengel, the newly appointed facilitator of the Logos Lecture Series.

Our next Logos Lecture Series event will feature Dr. Nicholas Perrin of Wheaton College, who will be speaking on “The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity.” Make a point of joining us at 7:00 PM on Friday, July 25, at The American Museum of Radio and Electricity here in Bellingham, Washington.

About the Lecture

If the fairly recent buzz over The Da Vinci Code is any indication, it appears that gnostic thought continues to hold a certain fascination in western culture. One of the most important early (so-called) gnostic texts, the Gospel of Thomas, has also attracted its own fair share of popular and scholarly attention, repeatedly prompting the question as to whether this gospel gives us undiscovered words of Jesus. This lecture will deal both with the scholarly controversy and the speaker’s original research on the significance of the Gospel of Thomas within early Christianity.

About the Speaker

Dr. Nicholas Perrin is the author of such fine books as Thomas: The Other Gospel, The Judas Gospel, and Questioning Q, among others, and has also authored many definitive papers and articles. He has extensively researched the Gospel of Thomas, historical Jesus, Paul and Jewish self-definition, and the Gospels. Dr. Perrin holds a Ph.D. from Marquette University, M.Div. from Covenant Theological Seminary, and B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and now serves as Assistant Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College.

Event Details

  • Title: “The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity”
  • Speaker: Dr. Nicholas Perrin of Wheaton College
  • Date: Friday, July 25
  • Time: 7:00-8:00 PM
  • Location: The American Museum of Radio and Electricity in Bellingham, Washington.

For those who are unable to attend the lecture we should have the audio available within a few days of the event. Please check the Lecture Series page for updates.

Bible Study Magazine for $2.95

We have several subscription options available for Bible Study Magazine. A one-year subscription is available for pre-order for only $14.95. If you want to order multiple copies of each issue to share with your family, friends, colleagues, study group, etc., you can purchase in quantities of 5, 25, or 100 at substantial discounts.

For those of you who have been hesitant to pre-order an entire year’s worth of issues, we’ve added the option to buy one copy of the first issue only for a mere $2.95. That’s 40% off the list price and covers the cost of shipping to addresses in the continental US (additional charges apply for other addresses). This will give you a chance to check it out without committing to a full year.

If you like what you see—and we’re confident that you will—you’ll be able to subscribe for a full year for $24.95. Of course, if you order the one-year subscription now, you’ll be able to get the Pre-Pub price of $14.95.

Amplified Bible Now Available for Download

Users have asked often about the Amplified Bible, but we’ve never been able to offer it as an individual download—until now. As of last Friday, you can purchase the Amplified Bible as a standalone product.

For those of you not familiar with the Amplified Bible, it’s distinguishing feature is how it gives alternate ways to translate words and phrase and explanatory notes right in the text in parentheses and brackets.

Compare 1 John 1:9 in the Amplified Bible to the ESV:

ESV

If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Amplified Bible

If we [freely] admit that we have sinned and confess our sins, He is faithful and just (true to His own nature and promises) and will forgive our sins [dismiss our lawlessness] and [continuously] cleanse us from all unrighteousness [everything not in conformity to His will in purpose, thought, and action].

For a limited time, we’re offering a special 50% discount to our blog readers. Use coupon code AMPLIFIED during checkout, and we’ll cut the price in half. The coupon code is valid through July 31, 2008, so don’t miss out.

That’s One Big Commentary on Hebrews

Back in March we announced that the Works of John Owen (17 Vols.) had finally been put on Pre-Pub. As we expected, it’s generated more than enough interest to send it into production. The digitization process is moving along nicely, even though we did have some lacunae in our copy of volume 17. (Volume 17, which is entitled Theologoumena Pantodapa, is an entirely Latin volume that was left out of the Banner of Truth reprint edition. It’s nearly impossible to find even in libraries, but we were finally able to borrow a copy from Westminster Seminary California.)

Though there was much rejoicing when we announced Owen’s 17-volume set, one question came repeatedly, “What about Owen’s massive Hebrews commentary?” Blog post comments, newsgroup postings, and emails all cried out for Owen’s detailed exposition of Hebrews.

I was happy to see the works of John Owen on Pre-Pub but my joy soon turned to disappointment. What happened to Owen’s work on Hebrews (7 volumes)? Would you consider having Owen’s Hebrews in the Logos electronic format even if it is a standalone collection? Surely it can’t be right not having Hebrews to complete the Owen’s collection. Please give due consideration to my request & do all you can to have Owen’s Hebrews in Logos.

. . .

Owen’s 7 vol. commentary on Hebrews is great. I have the books and have found them very useful.  He is exhaustive, approaching the text from many angles.

. . .

Thank you for doing this. I’ve been hoping for Owen for some time. I’m certain that this should be a big hit, and I am excited for Hebrews.

. . .

I am EATING UP all the Puritan materials that have gone Pre-Pub the last few months. I’ve got $1,400 worth of Pre-Pubs right now. Go Logos! Still looking forward to Owen’s Hebrews commentary, and hopefully John Gill’s commentary, more puritan works, etc.

In my original blog post I said, “If there is enough interest in Owen’s works, we’ll eventually put his 7-volume Hebrews commentary up on Pre-Pub as well.”

We’re glad to report that you can now place your pre-order for Owen’s 7-volume, 4,000-page, 2,000,000-word Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews.

Learning Greek Just Got a Little Easier

As many Bible college and seminary students (and teachers!) can attest, learning Greek can be a challenging task. “It’s Greek to me!” hasn’t become a well-known expression without good reason.

One of our goals here at Logos is to facilitate learning and using the original languages. We offer a huge number of Hebrew and Greek resources. But as helpful and essential as grammars are for learning Greek, reading books isn’t enough for many students. They need to hear it and speak it to get it to stick.

We introduced our Greek Pronunciation Addin a couple of years ago (a Hebrew Pronunciation Addin is on Pre-Pub). It’s included in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold and is also available for individual sale. The addin allows students to reinforce standard pronunciations, but only for lemmas (the dictionary form) and only one word at a time.

Learning the proper pronunciation for inflected forms involves a little more guesswork, especially for students learning Greek on their own without the help of an instructor.

With the new Greek Audio Bible, you can now hear Professor John Schwandt read any passage in the Greek New Testament. Simply enter a passage, and click play. The blue arrow will move with the audio to help you follow along in your Greek New Testament. If the normal reading speed is too fast, you can adjust it to slow or slower.

This is sure to be a helpful tool for beginner and intermediate Greek students.

Find out more at the product page, or see it in action in this video demonstration.

Free Downloads, Applications, and More!

We offer several free tools and applications in addition to our Libronix engine and decided that it was time to put them all together in one easy-to-access place.

If you’re relatively new to Logos, you may not know about things like NoteScraps, Shibboleth, Global Bible Reader, RefTagger, our Bible Widget, or the What the Bible Says About website.

Head over to https://www.logos.com/downloads and check them out.

Why a Print Magazine?

I believe in electronic publishing.

For ease of use, searchability, and fast distribution, there’s nothing better than pure data. So why is Logos Bible Software launching Bible Study Magazine as a paper product? To reach even more people with the excitement and encouragement of Bible study.

Paper isn’t dead. And while more and more people are discovering that it’s an awkward format for a ten volume Greek lexicon, it still remains a very attractive, portable, friendly, accessible, and bathroom-compatible format for browsing.

When I use electronic media, I’m on a mission to search and retrieve answers. And it’s great—I get answers quickly. But when I pick up a magazine, I find myself exposed to new information and new ideas. The layout and format draw me into stories I would never have searched for. I use my keyboard to look things up; magazines expand the world of things I want to know about.

The world of Bible study is bigger than looking up verses or doing a word study. Our goal with Bible Study Magazine is to expand your horizons. We want to introduce both the person in the pulpit and in the pew to topics, ideas, and tools for better Bible study.

For searching the writings of the Apostolic Fathers, there’s no better tool than Logos Bible Software. To introduce someone who’s never thought of them to the Fathers and explain how their writings can illuminate our Bible study and encourage us in our faith? That’s a job for Bible Study Magazine.

For the digerati among us who’ve given up on print and read everything from a screen, we’ll eventually have the magazine content available electronically for Logos Bible Software. In the meantime, though, we hope to use the power of print to reach a new and larger audience whose horizons we can expand and whose curiosity we can pique.

I know you are interested in Bible study, and I am confident you’ll find Bible Study Magazine well worth the subscription price. But I think an even better investment is to take a bundle subscription for your church or small group. We all know people who know they should spend more time in the Word, but who haven’t experienced the joy of digging deeper. Bible Study Magazine is designed to engage their interest, to make it easy to get started, and to expose them to the excitement of discovery in and around God’s Word.

We can make it as easy as picking up a magazine.

Buy 2, Get 14 Free!

Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on the Gospels and Acts (16 Vols.)Time is running out for the Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on the Gospels and Acts (16 Vols.) collection. It’s set to ship in just another day or two. At $299.95, it’s a steal. Let me tell you why.

You would spend an average of $305.28 to pick up any two of these titles in print. Yes, you read that correctly. Any two.

Here are the 16 volumes with Amazon’s latest prices:

  • $72.00 The Gospel of Matthew in Its Roman Imperial Context
  • $84.00 The Date of Mark’s Gospel: Insights from the Law in Earliest Christianity
  • $216.00 Mark’s Gospel—Prior or Posterior?: A Reappraisal of the Phenomenon of Order
  • $168.00 Word and Glory: On the Exegetical and Theological Background of John’s Prologue
  • $162.00 The Unity of the Farewell Discourse: The Literary Integrity of John 13:31-16:33
  • $180.00 The Lazarus Story within the Johannine Tradition
  • $180.00 Echoes of a Prophet: The Use of Ezekiel in the Gospel of John and in Literature of the Second Temple Period
  • $144.00 The Temple of Jesus’ Body: The Temple Theme in the Gospel of John
  • $64.80 Dynamic Reading of the Holy Spirit in Luke-Acts
  • $157.50 The Davidic Messiah in Luke-Acts: The Promise and Its Fulfillment in Lukan Christology
  • $168.00 The Finger of God and Pneumatology in Luke-Acts
  • $168.00 Echoes of Scripture in Luke-Acts: Telling the History of God’s People Intertextually
  • $180.00 Jerusalem and the Early Jesus Movement: The Q Community’s Attitude toward the Temple
  • $144.00 Apocalypticism, Anti-Semitism and the Historical Jesus: Subtexts in Criticism
  • $192.00 The Jewish Context of Jesus’ Miracles
  • $162.00 Historiography and Hermeneutics in Jesus Studies: An Examination of the Work of John Dominic Crossan and Ben F. Meyer

Most people probably wouldn’t spend the $2442.30 to pick up all 16 volumes in print. I know I wouldn’t. But are there any two books in this list that you think you might want to buy at some point? If so, why not buy the Logos collection instead? We’ll throw in the other 14 volumes for free!

Adding RefTagger to a Simple Machines Forum Site

LogoOver the last couple of months, several people have asked me if it is possible to add RefTagger to a forum site. I’ve set it up on a couple of different test installs, and it works very nicely. Forums are perfect places for RefTagger. If you run a forum site that deals with the Bible—or have plans to start one—I’d encourage you to give RefTagger a try. If you frequent a Christian forum site that has plain old naked Scripture references, why not send the administrators an emails and ask them to look into adding RefTagger?

There are a variety of different forum programs. vBulletin is probably the most popular, but since it’s not free, many use Simple Machines Forum (SMF) or phpBB.

Here’s a quick tutorial for adding RefTagger to your SMF site.

You simply need to add the RefTagger code immediately before the closing </body> tag in the index.template.php file in all of your active themes. (There are three installed by default.) You’ll find the </body> tag in the fourth section of code.

Here are the steps:

  1. Go to your Admin Center (http://yoursitename.com/index.php?action=admin).
  2. In the left sidebar, click on “Themes and Layout” under “Configuration.”
  3. Click “Modify Themes.”
  4. Select a theme, and click “Browse the templates and files in this theme.”
  5. Click on “index.template.php.”
  6. Navigate to the bottom of the fourth section of code and find the </body> tag (or just use Ctrl + F to find it).
  7. Paste in the RefTagger code immediately above the </body> tag.
  8. Scroll to the bottom of the page, and click “Save Changes.”
  9. Repeat steps 3-8 to add the code to your other theme.

I don’t see how to edit the default theme “SMF Default Theme – Core.” There’s probably a way to do it in the Admin Center, but I don’t see how. There are a couple of workarounds. You can switch your default theme to something else and uncheck the box “Allow members to select the ‘Default’ them.” If you like the default theme, you can always Create a copy of it and set the copy as your default.

If you have FTP access to your site’s files, it is fairly easily to add the RefTagger code manually. Just navigate to the Themes/default folder, locate the index.template.php file, and save a local copy (and a backup copy, too, just to be safe). Open the file with Dreamweaver or WordPad (or whatever program you like to use to edit code), locate the </body> tag, and paste in the RefTagger code. Save the file. Upload it to your server, overwriting the original file. You’re all set. RefTagger should now be up and running on your SMF site.