Get the Logos 5 Engine for Free

Logos 5 updateLast week, Logos 5 users received a free update (Logos 5.2) that included a number of feature and performance improvements. As always, you can find the complete release notes on the Logos forums.

But if you’re still using version 4 or earlier, you don’t have to miss out! You can download the Logos 5 engine for free.

The difference between updating and upgrading

We make an important distinction between upgrading and updating.

When you upgrade, you’re getting brand-new features, like the Timeline and Sermon Starter. You’re getting a wide range of new resources at heavily discounted prices, all powered by new datasets.

When you update, though, you don’t pay a thing—updating is free. You don’t get new books or datasets, but you do get the newest, best-performing code, plus free updates to books you already own—things like typo fixes, new content, and new tagging.

You can summarize the differences between upgrading and updating like this:

Price Books Datasets Code
Upgrading Not free New and updated New and updated New and updated
Updating Free Updated only Updated only New and updated

To get the most out of Logos 5, you’ll want to upgrade to a Logos 5 base package. In the meantime, though, you should update to the Logos 5 engine and get the improved performance of Logos 5.2—free.

Get the newest, best-performing software for free: download the Logos 5 engine today!

Get the Latest Westminster Hebrew Morphology for 50% Off!

BHW 2.18The latest version of the Westminster Hebrew Morphology, version 4.18, is now available. This marks our first upgrade of this significant database since version 4.2, released in 2004, and represents nearly a decade of improvements and corrections.

Already own the WHM? Get the update free

If you’ve been working with the old version 4.2, and you have your Logos Bible Software set to receive automatic updates, you might already have the new version, which was sent out as a free update for users of the 4.0/4.2 versions. Look for it under the new title: Biblia Hebraica Westmonasteriensis with Westminster Hebrew Morphology 4.18. (The version numbers aren’t decimals—think of 4.2 as version 2 of the fourth edition, and 4.18 as version 18.) The older releases were misnamed as Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia—version 1 of WHM was the text of BHS, but ever since version 2, this database has moved toward being a more accurate transcription of Codex Leningradensis (L), the oldest complete Hebrew Bible and the textual basis of the BHS and many other editions. The WHM has detailed notes about every place where it reads or corrects L differently than the BHS and the published fascicles of BHQ, making it very useful for comparing the finer points of these popular print editions.

New to the WHM? Get it for 50% off!

If you haven’t used the Westminster Hebrew Morphology, now’s the time to start—through December 2, we’ve cut the price of the new edition in half.

In addition to the textual notes already mentioned, you’ll get complete lexical and morphological analysis of every Hebrew and Aramaic word in the Bible. These tags help you identify the form of each word and its function in the sentence; they also facilitate advanced searching. WHM also includes both the Kethiv and the Qere readings, in which the text to be read aloud is different from the written text, and a reconstruction and analysis of the Kethiv readings, which by their nature lack vowels in the manuscript of L.

One of the most accurate morph databases available

The Westminster Hebrew Morphology, one of the first Hebrew Bible databases made widely available, has benefited from an enormous quantity of feedback from scholars and students. The editors at the J. Alan Groves Center for Advanced Biblical Research (formerly the Westminster Hebrew Institute) have developed an impressive issue-tracking database to store reports and discussions of proposed changes, which helps maintain consistency and prevent regression errors. The user feedback and the editors’ hard work have created one of the most accurate morph databases available—one that gets better with every release.

In addition, the WHM tags many features not found in most other databases. Starting with version 4.12, for instance, it’s been tagging “unexpected forms”—for example, pronominal suffixes that appear at first glance to be feminine, but that context demands be read as masculine (a phenomenon that happens most often with words accented to indicate a “pause” in the verse). It also labels other morphological characteristics mentioned in advanced Hebrew grammars, such as the “energic nun,” making it easier to understand what’s going on with relatively rare word forms.

Get 50% off the latest version of the Westminster Hebrew Morphology today!

The New International Commentary: Now Available in Individual Volumes!

NICOTIt comes as no surprise that The New International Commentary (NIC) is among our best-selling resources. The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (NICOT) and the New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT) are authoritative scriptural guides, bridging the cultural gap between today’s world and the Bible’s. Each volume aims to help us hear God’s Word as clearly as possible.

“The NIC is an amazing scholarly, protestant, evangelical commentary series. It gives verse-by-verse commentary on almost every book of the Bible, including immensely helpful introductory information. The only thing better than the commentary series itself is being able to have the entire thing with you, on your laptop, wherever you go. The NIC for Logos is a great resource that every seminarian should consider.”

GoingToSeminary.com review

Until recently, these volumes have only been available together, in larger collections. But now, after teaming up with Eerdmans Publishing, we’re excited to announce that we’re offering these commentaries as standalone collections and individual titles!

Get the new NICOT/NICNT collections at the best price

LargeCollectionTo celebrate, we’re offering special discounts for a limited time. Get the volumes you want before it’s too late—this sale runs only through December 2. You can choose from some exciting new collections, such as:

And you have many more collections to choose from—be sure to check out all the NICOT/NICNT collections and volumes, as well as the rest of our new Eerdmans resources.

Don’t miss out—this sale ends December 2. Get your NICOT/NICNT volumes and collections today!

Logos 5: Locate Specific Charts and Tables

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently emailed me this question:

I was wanting to find a chart that shows all the kings of Israel and Judah, along with the prophets who were active during the reign of each king. How would I search for something like that?

To locate such charts, I suggest using the Logos image search:

  • Click the Search icon.
  • Select Image as the search type (A).
  • Select Entire Library from the range dropdown list (B).
  • Click the fields dropdown list, which probably says All Images (C).

  • Select desired fields, such as ChartsInfographicsTable, and Timelines (D).

  • Type this text in the find box: king prophet (E).

  • Click the search panel menu (F).
  • Select Match all word forms (G).

  • Press Enter to generate the search.

This search locates all the designated images containing both the words king(s) AND prophet(s) (H)!

Get 8 John Piper Titles—Free!

There are plenty of reasons you should download the free Vyrso app. Here’s a big one: you’ll get free and discounted books!

Right now, we’re offering free titles by Janette Oke, Kathleen Morgan, and Steve Farrar, plus giving away eight books by John Piper. Here’s what you can get:

  1. A Holy AmbitionSanctification in the Everyday: Three Sermons by John Piper
  2. Alive to Wonder: Celebrating the Influence of C. S. Lewis
  3. Preparing for Marriage: Help for Christian Couples
  4.  A Holy Ambition: To Preach Where Christ Has Not Been Named
  5. Disability and the Sovereign Goodness of God: Resources from John Piper
  6. Take Care How You Listen: Sermons by John Piper on Receiving the Word
  7. Good News of Great Joy: Daily Readings for Advent
  8. Love to the Uttermost: Devotional Readings for Holy Week

Get the Vyrso app free

Downloading the Vyrso app is free and easy. Simply choose your device (iOS or Android), sign in with your Logos account (or register for one for free), and voilà—you can seamlessly integrate your Bible study materials with your personal reading.

Find the books you love on Vyrso: download the free app today!

Stay tuned to Vyrso Voice for other freebies

Vyrso App

Did you know that we recently gave away Warren Wiersbe’s 10 People Every Christian Should Know? Or Julie Cantrell’s bestselling novel Into the Free? If you subscribed to the Vyrso blog, you’d be in the know about all of Vyrso’s top deals and freebies. Plus, you’d get a front-row seat to exclusive interviews and guest posts by Christian authors like Tullian Tchividjian, Pete Wilson, and Elyse Fitzpatrick.

Download the Vyrso app for free, and then subscribe to Vyrso Voice today!

A Place for Hope: An Interview with Dr. Gregory Jantz

Dr Gregory JantzRecently, Logos had the opportunity to speak with author Dr. Gregory Jantz, founder of A Place for Hope, a treatment center in Seattle for individuals struggling with addiction, depression, trauma, and other life challenges.

You founded A Place of Hope 30 years ago, you’ve written 28 books, you’ve impacted thousands of lives—you’re obviously doing something right. What’s the “whole person care” approach you implement at A Place for Hope?

The whole care approach is a model I created that puts together a team specifically based on what a patient’s needs are. We have medical, psychiatric, fitness, and natural health care staff, as well as massage therapists, counselors, pastors, and chemical-dependency doctors. A whole team fit for each individual.

How does your organization differentiate itself from other treatment centers for emotional and health issues?

We’re all Christians, so we’re [a] faith-based [organization]. The whole person care is the spiritual foundation. Our theme verse is Jeremiah 29:11—it’s on the wall by the entrance. That verse is a reminder and promise to us all that we have a future, and it’s good.

What are some tips for people feeling angry or distressed, and wanting to get rid of those feelings in a healthy way?

Those feelings have to be dealt with and recognized as a problem. Many times, we develop a [concept] of unforgiveness in our lives and don’t deal with reality or handle anger well. [Thus], the step to recovery is self-forgiveness. The second step takes on the question of “how am I going to forgive those who have hurt me?” The goal is to move from being angry to [understanding] what to do with that anger.

What inspired A Place for Hope—did you wake up one day and decide “I’m going to change thousands of lives”?

The idea of whole person care came to me in college. It means living whole lives as God and Christ designed for us. The vision for A Place for Hope grew from the belief that you have to minister to the whole person in all aspects of life.

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Be sure to pre-order the Gregory Jantz Collection while it’s still on Pre-Pub for 25% off. Claim your copy before the price goes up!

Why NAMB Is Equipping Church Planters with Logos and Proclaim

namb-send-network-logos-350x200Church planters need a library that’s deep enough for preparing sermons, yet compact enough to bring with them wherever they go.

While their church is new and growing, many planters are holding service in temporary spaces, so they just don’t have the shelf space for hundreds of books. They’re also facing a wide variety of commitments on a tight schedule. They need more than just a library—they need a research assistant.

“Church planters are some of the most amazing people I know. With full schedules and modest finances, dedicating resources and shelf-space to a library of books and commentaries is hard for many to do.” —Aaron Linne, Logos’ director of church products

That’s why the North American Mission Board (NAMB) is giving each of its church planters a Logos 5 Silver base package and a six-month license to Proclaim. They’re giving all these pastors the best tools and resources to disciple their churches.

“This will be a great step in helping our church planters go deeper as they explore Scripture for their own spiritual growth and as they lead members of their congregations to grow deeper in their faith.” —Micah Millican, NAMB’s director of church planter relations

Equip your organization with the best tools for Bible study

We’ve been expanding our bulk-purchasing options for ministries—now churches, colleges, and ministry groups can make cost-effective Bible study tools available for entire organizations at once. If you’d like to set up your whole faculty, seminary, congregation, or other organization with Logos 5, Proclaim, or both, now you can!

If you’re interested in purchasing bulk licenses for your organization, please contact our sales team:

Academic SalesAcademic@Logos.com | (800) 878-4191

Why You Should Care about Math

“Mathematics,” wrote the agnostic philosopher Bertrand Russell, “is, I believe, the chief source of belief in eternal and exact truth.” Of course, there are lots of other reasons to believe in eternal, exact truth, but Russell’s getting at something really interesting: math has consequences for how we think.

Here’s the story.

Pythagoras introduces abstract numbers

PythagorasFor the ancient Greeks, math was one with metaphysics. It all started in the sixth century BC, with Pythagoras—the first of the Greeks to treat numbers as abstract entities existing in their own right. (Before him, numbering was all about the things being numbered, not the numbers themselves—as David Foster Wallace puts it, “the Babylonians and Egyptians were . . . interested in the five oranges rather than the 5.”) In fact, as Russell explains, Pythagorean numbers and math were more real than sensory reality:

“Geometry [derived from Pythagorean math] deals with exact circles, but no sensible [perceptible] object is exactly circular . . . . This suggests the view that all exact reasoning applies to ideal as opposed to sensible objects; it is natural to go further, and to argue that thought is nobler than sense, and the objects of thought more real than those of sense-perception. . . . numbers, if real at all, are eternal and not in time. Such eternal objects can be conceived as God’s thoughts.”

And here’s the important part—for pretty much the first time ever, all this reasoning started spilling over into the observed world. Russell explains:

“Geometry . . . starts with axioms which are (or are deemed to be) self-evident, and proceeds, by deductive reasoning, to arrive at theorems that are very far from self-evident. The axioms and theorems are held to be true of actual space, which is something given in experience. It thus appeared to be possible to discover things about the actual world by first noticing what is self-evident and then using deduction.” (Emphasis added)

It’s largely thanks to Greek math that we have deductive philosophy, the rigor of logic, and the scientific method. Were it not for Pythagoras, Russell writes, “theologians would not have sought logical proofs of God and immortality.” Russell’s conclusion is simple: “I do not know of any other man who has been as influential as he was in the sphere of thought.”

Plato reimagines abstraction as the theory of forms

plato-greek-mathematicsThe Pythagoreans exerted tremendous influence on Plato, whose most important innovation was the theory of forms. Plato held that what’s real in the world is not matter, not individuals, but classes, genres, species. Over two thousand years later, Schopenhauer put it like this: “Whoever hears me assert that the grey cat playing just now in the yard is the same one that did jumps and tricks there five hundred years ago will think what he likes of me, but it is a stranger form of madness to imagine that the present-day cat is fundamentally an entirely different one.”

So here’s the cool part: Plato’s forms are abstract in the same way as Pythagoras’ numbers. As Wallace puts it, “The conceptual move from ‘five oranges’ and ‘five pennies’ to the quantity five and the integer 5 is precisely Plato’s move from ‘man’ and ‘men’ to Man.” (Mathematicians who believe that numbers and mathematical relations exist on their own, outside of human conception, are even called Platonists.) Russell made the same connection: “what appears as Platonism is, when analysed, found to be in essence Pythagoreanism. [Plato’s] whole conception of an eternal world, revealed to the intellect but not to the senses, is derived from him.”

And Plato’s forms, of course, influenced pretty much the whole of Western thought. It’s partially thanks to Greek math, then, that we so readily categorize the world.

Zeno and Aristotle argue about infinity

aristotle-greek-mathematics“There is a concept,” wrote Jorge Luis Borges, “that corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite.” The story gets even more interesting with Zeno, who, working in Pythagoras’ footsteps, was the first to tease out infinity’s corrupting, upsetting properties. He was the one who argued that fleet Achilles could never catch the tortoise—that, first, Achilles would have to cover half the remaining distance, then three-quarters, then seven-eighths, forever approaching but never passing his competitor. The thrust of the problem: Achilles must occupy every point previously occupied by the tortoise, but as soon as he does, the tortoise has moved on and Achilles has—forever—another vanishingly small point left to occupy.

Aristotle, a former star pupil of Plato’s, countered by proposing two senses of the infinite: actual and potential, corresponding to extension and subdivision. No real-life distance, he said, is actually infinite; every distance is potentially so. (An irony: Aristotle also countered Plato’s forms, arguing that if two men are joined by the form Man, the men and Man have something in common—and isn’t there, then, a third form comprising men and Man? And a fourth form comprising men, Man, and the third form that joins them? Aristotle rejected Zeno’s infinite regress as merely potential; he rejected Plato’s forms using an infinite regress that is itself potential.)

Satisfied? Me neither. But, though Aristotle’s answer to Zeno isn’t that compelling, it was enormously influential—by relegating infinity’s tricky parts to the merely potential, it basically let math keep functioning in the presence of the infinite.

Calculus and set theory finish what the Greeks started

Not until Leibniz and Newton invented calculus would Western math develop the tools to start really answering Zeno. And when they did, it was Aristotle’s potential infinities that allowed for infinitesimals—quantities so small they can’t be added, yet somehow big enough to serve as divisors. (Berkeley, the famous empiricist and apologist, argued that calculus, no less than religion, comes down to faith—that “he who can digest a second or third [infinitesimal ratio] . . . need not, methinks, be squeamish about [anything] in divinity.”) Calculus’ notion of limits lets us look at a Zenoan infinite sequence—one-half, one-quarter, one-eighth, one-sixteenth—and prove that the segments add up not to infinity but to one; this answers the paradox, though not in a way that’s philosophically interesting. After all, by relying on infinitesimals, it relies on Aristotle’s old loophole-esque potential infinities.

Even more interesting is the work of Georg Cantor, who defined an infinite set as that which can be divided into subsets that are also infinite. (Cantor felt that his insights into the infinite had been directly communicated to him by God.) Because no member of the infinite set {10, 20, 30, 40 . . .} lacks a corresponding number in the infinite set {1, 2, 3, 4 . . .}, there are precisely as many multiples of ten as there are of one. The part, infinitely subdivided, is just as large as the whole; there are as many points on Zeno’s racetrack as there are in the whole universe. So check it out: after Cantor, we can conclude that Achilles, despite the longer distance ahead of him, doesn’t need to cover more points. Since both distances’ points are infinite—actually infinite, not just potentially so—the sets are 1:1 matches, and Achilles’ greater speed can win the day. For Russell, this was the first response worthy of being called a true solution.

Thanks to Pythagoras, we can think about numbers as abstract entities existing in their own right. Thanks to Plato, we can apply the same kind of abstraction to forms in general. Thanks to Zeno and Aristotle, we can complete the process of abstraction by thinking about infinity. And thanks to modern calculus (with its Aristotelian infinitesimals) and set theory (with its deeply Zenoan behavior), we can do more than just function in the presence of infinity—we can use it to solve problems.

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5 reasons you should study Greek math

pythagoras-greek-mathematicsIf you’ve found this interesting, it’s worth your time to keep learning about Greek math. Here’s why:

  1. Everyone involved was enormously influential. Pythagoras was, for Russell, the single most influential person in the sphere of thought. Plato and Aristotle are widely considered the fathers of Western philosophy. Zeno’s infinite regress has become something of a philosophical testing ground—it reappears not only in Aristotle but also in Agrippa, Plotinus, Aquinas, Leibniz, Mill, Bradley, Carroll, James, Cantor, and Russell himself.
  2. Greek math contributed to Platonism, and Platonism—through Clement, Origen, Augustine, and others—influenced early Christianity.
  3. Greek math is the context for some of modernity’s most interesting thought. Modern notions of infinity make more sense when you know Zeno’s and Aristotle’s arguments.
  4. These texts represent a remarkable value. You can get the Greek Mathematical Works Collection—which sets you up to study Pythagoras, Zeno, Greek geometry, and more—on Community Pricing for just $14; that’s 58% off. Then add the Works of Plato ($30 | 83% off), and deepen your study with the Select Works of Aristotle ($100 | 62% off). For such rich material, that’s a smart investment.
  5. The Logos editions are the most useful—ever. Math, with its refutations, its shared ideas, and its centuries-long lines of influence, is part of history’s Great Conversation. To study it, you need to be able to make connections. In the past, that would have required flipping through paper books and poring over indexes; not so with Noet, Logos’ philosophy and classics division. You’ll study primary texts alongside commentaries, follow lines of thought from author to author, and record your insights with notes and highlights that show up across all your devices.

Math matters. Understand its origins with the best texts and tools.

Bid on the Greek Mathematical Works Collection, the Works of Plato, and the Select Works of Aristotle, or browse more philosophical resources at Noet.com.

 
Then keep reading—you know why math’s important; what about philosophy?

Get Introductory Discounts on More Than 300 Eerdmans Titles!

Eerdmans-Bible-Reference-Bundle-(309-vols.)Logos Bible Software has teamed up with Eerdmans Publishing to make more than 300 important Eerdmans titles available on Pre-Pub. For over 100 years, Eerdmans Publishing has been publishing academic works in theology, biblical studies, religious history, and reference, as well as popular titles in spirituality, social and cultural criticism, and literature.

Combining trusted Eerdmans resources with Logos’ network of contents and features means
you can power your Bible study with some of the best resources available.

Introductory savings on Eerdmans titles

Pre-order any Eerdmans title or collection before December 2 and you’ll get special introductory pricing! We’re rolling out this partnership with an amazing opportunity to save big on these valuable additions to your Bible study library. All you have to do is pre-order early.

These Eerdmans titles include:

  • Bible commentaries by Frederick Dale Bruner, Robert Gundry, Arland Hultgren, Walter Brueggemann, James D. G. Dunn, C. L. Seow, Bruce Waltke, and others
  • 7 volumes on early Judaism
  • 2 new D. A. Carson books
  • 9 books on early Christianity, including 4 books from Larry Hurtado
  • 9 preaching resources, including 5 books on preaching Christ from Scripture, and Neal Plantinga’s new book on reading for preaching
  • 7 books on the Dead Sea Scrolls
  • Stanley Porter’s Fundamentals of New Testament Greek
  • 57 books covering the Gospels, Paul, and NT studies
  • 5 books by James D. G. Dunn
  • William Loader’s series on sexuality in early Judaism and Christianity
  • The 5-volume Book of Acts in Its First Century Setting series
  • Books by Anthony Hoekema, Mark Noll, Eugene Peterson, George Eldon Ladd, David Instone-Brewer, Abraham Kuyper, and others
  • Plus, more than a hundred additional books on Bible backgrounds, hermeneutics, interpretation, history, philosophy, and more

So get your pre-orders in before December 2 and save!

The Eerdmans Bible Reference Bundle (309 vols.)

Not sure which Eerdmans title you can do without? That’s okay—you can get them all in the enormous 309-volume Eerdmans Bible Reference Bundle. Order it before December 2 and save! This amazing A Commentary on Jeremiah, Brueggemanncollection includes titles like:

A Commentary on Jeremiah: Exile and Homecoming by Walter Bruggemann

From one of our premier Old Testament scholars, this practical resource not only reveals the depths of Jeremiah’s story, but also reminds us of our call to be  faithful and obedient, full of justice, and compassionate.

Matthew, A Commentary, vol. 1, BrunerMatthew: A Commentary. Volume 1: The Christbook, Matthew 1–12 and Matthew: A Commentary: The Churchbook, Matthew 13–28 by Frederick Dale Bruner

Full of rich history and deep theological insight, Bruner’s two-volume work on Matthew’s Gospel brings the past to bear on the present. Theologians, academics, scholars, and laypeople will all benefit from hearing how early Christians read Matthew, and how we can benefit from it today.

Poet and Peasant, BaileyPoet and Peasant and Through Peasant Eyes by Ken Bailey

A contemporary classic, the combined Poet and Peasant and Through Peasant Eyes provides an intensive study of Luke’s parables. Bailey focuses on how these parables would have been received by a first-century Middle Eastern peasant culture.

The Intolerance of Tolerance by D. A. Carson

The Intolerance of Tolerance, CarsonHow has the meaning of “tolerance” changed in recent years? In this thoughtful book, Carson discusses how tolerance has changed from defending the rights of those who hold different beliefs to the affirmation that all beliefs hold the same weight and value.

The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Bible by James C. VanderKam

How can Dead Sea Scrolls scholarship augment your Bible study? VanderKam discusses the latest Dead Sea Scroll developments, focusing on relevant The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Bible, VanderKaminformation from the scrolls and laying out their significance for biblical studies. This rich compendium from a distinguished scholar is essential reading for all who work at understanding biblical texts and their ancient context.

This is only the beginning of the amazing content in this colossal collection. Act now and you can get these 5 insightful works, plus 304 more—and save big!

Or scroll through all the Eerdmans books and collections on Pre-Pub and pick out the ones you need. But remember, prices go up on December 2!

5 Reasons to Pre-order the Mobile Ed Bible and Doctrine Foundations Bundle

LME-LogoA few months ago, the era of Logos Mobile Education began with the Pre-Pub release of the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle. Here are five reasons you should pre-order it before the price goes up:

1. You’ll learn from renowned Bible scholars and teachers. Mobile Ed professors—such as Drs. Mark Futato, Lynn Cohick, and Michael Goheen—are seasoned classroom teachers, each with a minimum of 10 years’ experience. They’re also dedicated scholars and clear thinkers with considerable experience teaching in the local church. Meet the Mobile Ed faculty.

2. Your coursework will be integrated with Logos. Mobile Ed was created to work with your Logos software. As you study, you’ll be able to easily click through to the right book, the right page—even the right sentence. And your video lectures will be completely searchable within your library, so you’ll be able to use them time and time again. Find out how Logos integrates with Mobile Ed.

logos-mobile-education-bible-and-doctrine-foundations-bundle3. You’ll take your classes with you wherever you go. The Mobile Ed curriculum includes courses on theology, interpretation, church history, original-language study, counseling, ministry, and more. In addition to high-quality coursework, Mobile Ed brings the professors, the library, the visual demonstrations of software features, and the online classroom community directly to you—on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device. Learn more about Mobile Ed’s coursework.

4. You can split up the costs over 12 months. As with any Pre-Pub, if you pre-order the Bible and Doctrine Foundations Bundle now, your credit card won’t be billed until it’s available. But if you want an even more budget-minded solution, you can pre-order now and spread the payments out over a year. The only way to get the Mobile Ed payment plan is to contact us directly—we’ll work with you one on one to make sure you’re taken care of. Give us a call at 800-875-6467 (or 1-360-527-1700 from outside the US and Canada).

5. You’ll learn in community. Interact with other students through Faithlife, a social network that reaches Christian students, pastors, and churches across the globe. Form groups, ask questions, give feedback, and share notes and ideas in an environment that’s encouraging and helpful. Check out the benefits of Mobile Ed’s Faithlife community.

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Meet the faculty, learn more about the coursework, and explore the benefits of Mobile Ed’s online community—visit the Logos Mobile Ed page and pre-order the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle today.