A Few Minutes Could Save You…

Refer-A-Friend Program

It is quite surprising when we hear of people who have never heard of things we have been doing for a while. One of those things is our Refer-A-Friend program.

In just a few easy steps, we can send your pastor, friends, co-workers, ministry leaders, and/or family members a coupon code to receive 15% off a Logos 4 base package. And to make it worth a few moments of your time, if your recommendation turns into a sale, we give you a $25 gift certificate good toward a web purchase on Logos.com.

To get started, make sure you Sign In to your Logos.com account, and then head on over to www.logos.com/referafriend.

The first step asks you to enter a person’s email address and their name. We will use it to send your friend two emails which you will be able to view and customize. And the email will not be added to any lists, so we won’t make you look bad.

Next, you see a preview of a plain text email we will send on your behalf. You can easily edit the email to include a personal message if you want, or you can click Next to proceed.

The final step is to select one of seven base packages we include in the program. The default recommendation is set for Scholar’s Library as this is our best selling collection, but you have the option to recommend up to Scholar’s Library: Platinum.

At this point, you may click Send!, or you can see a preview of the fancy html message we’ll send featuring your recommended product.

Chances are, your small group leader would benefit greatly using Leader’s Library, and suggesting Scholar’s Library or above to your relative heading to seminary would make his or her studies and term papers a whole lot easier. Since the Refer-A-Friend program works for the majority of our collections, you can suggest the collection you think would be most valuable to your friend. And don’t worry if you are not sure which collection would be best. If you suggest Scholar’s Library and they end up purchasing Scholar’s Library: Gold, you’ll still get a $25 gift certificate—as long as it is included in the program and they use the coupon code you send them!

You can suggest one of the following collections:

With this ability to offer your friends a discount on a product that hopefully has transformed your devotional times, your sermon or Bible study preparation, or has helped you through seminary, why would you not take a few minutes to run down your list of contacts and send them a quick, pre-formatted email? Not only will you be helping transform their Bible study, you could also "pocket" a cool $25 credit for each person who acts on your recommendation.

So what are you waiting for? Refer-A-Friend Now!

Visit our custom upgrade discount calculator to see what discounts you qualify for on an upgrade to a brand new Logos 4 base package.

New customers should visit https://www.logos.com/4 to learn more and see what discounts are currently available.

Logos 4: Importing Notes and User-Created Content from LDLS3

Yes, the wait is finally over. Yesterday’s announcement of Logos Bible Software 4.0b mentioned what many have been waiting for: Support for importing LDLS3 user-created content.

Specifically, Logos 4.0b now supports importing notes, highlighting, favorites, and prayer lists. Along with this release, regardless if you are importing from LDLS3 or not, Notes now allow for user-editable titles, as well as creating Notes for a reference range, not just a single verse.

So without further ado, let’s get your notes from Logos 3 to Logos 4.

Since resources have changed over the years because we’ve corrected typos, added new hyperlinks, and made other edits, in certain cases, these changes can prevent Logos 4 from importing notes from Libronix DLS 3 correctly. In order to minimize the likelihood of notes not being transferred, we highly recommend you download the Custom Toolbar for LDLS3 that prepares your notes for importing into Logos 4.

Getting the toolbar:

  • Run LDLS3, and click the newly added Update Notes Now button.
  • When Update Notes Now finishes, return to Logos 4.

Now are you ready for this? In Logos 4 type Import All into the Command bar, hit enter, and sit back. You’ll then see the “Importing…” status message in the upper-right corner of the main window. That’s it.

Content imported into Logos 4 “remembers” that it was imported such that consecutive imports can be run in Logos 4, without adverse effects. Changes to imported content in Logos 4 will clear the link between Logos 4 and LDLS3, so if you edit an imported item in Logos 4, and then re-import, you will see the original item from LDLS3 along with the edited item in Logos 4.This is intentional in order to recover an original note without over writing the new content.

If you no longer want to use some of your user-created content from LDLS3, but want other parts, like your extensive Prayer Lists, there are commands for a more targeted import.

Additional Commands:

Import Notes
Imports only notes from LDLS3

Import Highlighting
Imports only highlighting from LDLS3

Import Favorites
Imports only favorites from LDLS3

Import Prayer Lists
Imports only prayers lists from LDLS3

Import delete (All|Notes|Highlighting|Favorites|Prayer Lists)

Deletes all imported content of the specified type

If you were on the fence about upgrading to Logos 4 because you couldn’t transfer your Notes, Highlighting, Favorites, or Prayer Lists, now is a great time to upgrade to Logos 4. Logos 4 is now better than ever, and you can be sure we’re already working to add additional features.

Logos 4.0b Is Now Available

A new version of Logos 4 will be available later today as a free download to all Logos 4 users. Version 4.0b adds a plethora of new features and improvements and squashes lots of little bugs. If you have automatic updating enabled (screenshot), which is the default setting, Logos 4 will notify you that updates are ready to be installed.

When you see the balloon tooltip window, right-click on the Logos icon in your system tray and choose to “Install update” (screenshot). If Logos 4 hasn’t downloaded the update by the end of the day and you just can’t wait any longer to get your hands on the latest release, just type Update Now into the command bar (screenshot). This will force Logos 4 to check for any available updates (screenshot) and begin downloading them.

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Logos 4: Make Logos Easy on the Eyes

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

The older I get, the more I appreciate the features in Logos 4 that allow me to adjust the display of the program and resources. Here are few reminders so that you can make Logos easy on the eyes:

To adjust the text size of an open panel:

  • Choose the panel menu on an open panel
  • Move the slide bar at the top of the menu to adjust the text size in that panel

To change the default text size of resources:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • In the Fonts section select a different Default Text Size from the drop down list

To change the default font in resources:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • In the Fonts section select a different Default Font from the drop down list

To change the background color in resource panels:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • In the Accessibility section select a different color from the Resource Panel Background drop down list

To change the default size of the entire program:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • In the Accessibility section select a different Program Scaling percentage from the drop down list

Last Chance to Pre-Order The Expositor’s Bible Commentary

For years, The Expositor’s Bible Commentary has been one of our most requested commentary sets. Now, we’re pleased to announce that it will be available in Logos Bible Software in just a few days.

The Gold Medallion Award-winning Expositor’s Bible Commentary, published by Zondervan, is a major contribution to the study and understanding of the Scriptures. Providing pastors and Bible students with a comprehensive and scholarly tool for the exposition of the Scriptures and the teaching and proclamation of their message, this 12-volume reference work has become a staple of seminary and college libraries and pastors’ studies worldwide.

Some of the leading evangelical biblical scholars of the past half-century have contributed to The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, including:

The Expositor's Bible Commentary (12 Vols.)

  • F. F. Bruce
  • Bruce M. Metzger
  • Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.
  • Gordon D. Fee
  • I. Howard Marshall
  • D. A. Carson
  • James Montgomery Boice
  • Richard N. Longenecker
  • Lots of others. Head on over to the product page to see the complete list.

Each volume in The Expositor’s Bible Commentary contains an introduction to authorship and historical issues, outlines of each book of the Bible, exposition and notes on the entire Bible, detailed bibliographies on every book of the Bible, and more. It also covers textual issues, and transliteration and translation of Semitic and Greek words make the more technical notes accessible to readers unacquainted with the biblical languages. In short, this is the premiere evangelical commentary on the Bible, and it will be available in Logos Bible Software in just a few days. Head on over to the product page to place your pre-order before it ships on Monday.

Are You a Pradis User?

If you’re a Pradis user, we want to make your transition to Logos Bible Software as smooth as possible. We realize that you might have spent years building up the titles in your Pradis library, and you’ve made a significant financial investment in buying those titles.

For registered Pradis users only, Zondervan has authorized a special discount on The Expositor’s Bible Commentary in addition to the Pre-Pub discount. The discount is designed to help you transition to Logos Bible Software. If you’re a registered Pradis user, this is your chance to get your books in Logos Bible Software at rock-bottom prices. Remember, the discount applies only for Pradis users. To learn how to get your discount, read the previous blog post for all the details.

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Free Finnish Bible

Raamattu 1933, 1938 (Finnish Bible)

Do you read Finnish? Or do you know someone who does? Or do you just like free books, even if you can’t read them? :)

We’ve recently released the Logos edition of Raamattu—a Bible from the Finnish Bible Society. Best of all, we’re able to offer it for free.

The first Finnish translation of the Bible appeared in 1548 by Mikael Agricola. He used Luther’s German Bible as the translation base. In 1632, the Bible was again translated into Finnish, but this time using the original language texts. The complete version appeared in 1642, and new editions were issued in 1685, 1758, and 1776. In the early twentieth century, the need for an updated translation of the Bible into Finnish had become apparent. Work on the new translation was begun in 1911 at the initiative of the Finnish Bible Society and the Finnish Lutheran Church. The first translation work was finished in 1933, and the completed version was published in 1938.

Here’s how to add this translation to your library for free:

Logos 4 Users:

If you have Logos Bible Software 4, adding resources to your library is easy.

Go the product page. Click Add to Cart (or just add it straight to your cart from here). Proceed through the checkout process and click “Submit Order.” If you don’t have a credit card on file, you’ll still need to enter your credit card information. Don’t worry, you won’t be charged anything. It’s the only way to finish the checkout process in our current system.

In Logos 4, type “Update Now” into the Command Bar. Logos 4 will find and begin downloading new resources, and the Logos icon will appear in your system tray while this is happening. When it’s finished, you’ll be asked to restart Logos 4.

After you restart Logos 4, you’ll be able to access your new Finnish Bible. If you have a Logos 4 base package, you can also access it on your iPhone or iPod Touch using the Logos iPhone app!

If you’re not a Logos 4 user yet, be sure to visit the custom upgrade discount calculator to see what discounts you qualify for on an upgrade to a brand new Logos 4 base package.

Logos 3 / Libronix Users:

If you’re still using Libronix, here are the steps to follow to get your free book:

Step 1: Log in to your logos.com account. If you don’t have one, you’ll need to create one.

Step 2: Make sure that your Libronix Customer ID is associated with your Logos.com account. Go to My Account, enter your Libronix Customer ID, and click “Confirm.” If it’s already there, no need to do anything. (If you don’t know your Libronix Customer ID, you can find it in Libronix by going to Help | About Libronix DLS.)

Step 3: Go the product page. Click Add to Cart (or just add it straight to your cart from here). Proceed through the checkout process and click “Submit Order.” If you don’t have a credit card on file, you’ll still need to enter your credit card information. Don’t worry, you won’t be charged anything. It’s the only way to finish the checkout process in our current system.

Step 4: Unlock and download your new book. If you’re on a Windows machine, just click the orange “Unlock & Download” button. If you’re on a Mac, just synchronize your licenses (Tools | Library Management | Synchronize Licenses) and manually put the book file in your resources folder (Macintosh HD/Library/Application Support/Libronix DLS/Resources on the startup volume).

Step 5: Start using your new book! Open Libronix, open My Library, then type Raamattu to find it.

Spread the word! If you have Finnish-speaking friends, let them know that they can get a Finnish Bible for free.

An Alternate Book of Esther

I was flipping through the Esther volume of the Göttingen Septuagint and saw something unusual:

Göttingen Septuagint

If you examine this page carefully, you’ll see that the top section contains Greek text of a portion of Esther. Under that is a critical apparatus – a shorthand method of documenting manuscript evidence, showing which manuscripts agree with the text above and which manuscripts disagree, and how they disagree.
Then under the apparatus there is second section of Greek text (market by an L in the margin) followed by a second apparatus. We’ve seen something like this before. The ancient Greek book of Daniel, for example, exists in both the Old Greek and the Theodotion versions, and other editions of the LXX, such as Rahlfs and Swete, have presented both versions of that text either on facing pages or with one version on top of the other. Similar parallel texts are presented for the shorter and longer versions of Tobit and those parts of Joshua and Judges where codices Alexandrinus and Vaticanus disagree. But I’ve never seen this phenomenon in a printed edition of Esther before.
The marginal ‘L’ indicates that the text is thought by some scholars to be a Lucianic recension, or revision, of the Septuagint. Lucian was a Christian martyr who died in 312 AD and was famous for comparing the various Greek translations with the Hebrew Scriptures and preparing new Greek texts that were in greater agreement with the Hebrew originals.
However, the L-Text of Esther is different from the Septuagint text in some surprising ways that seem, to some scholars, inconsistent with the Lucianic reforms. The LXX and the L-Text both contain the so-called ‘Additions to Esther’ not found in the Hebrew Massoretic Text (MT), and the L-Text and LXX are significantly similar for those Additions. But in places where the L-Text and the LXX are clearly translating the same Hebrew, there is very little word for word correspondence. And at several junctures, it seems that the L-Text must be translating a different Hebrew source all-together. Carey Moore in his Anchor Bible volume on Esther, and elsewhere, has argued that the L-Text of Esther is really a fresh translation from a Hebrew original that is, at points, very different from the Hebrew (MT) that we have today. Followers of this line of reasoning usually refer to this as the Alpha-Text or A-Text of Esther, rather than the L-Text. If Moore is right, then the A-Text of Esther isn’t so much useful for determining the original text of the Massoretic version of Esther, but is rather more valuable for illuminating a version of Esther that no longer exists in any Hebrew manuscript known today.
Right now the Göttingen Septuagint is gathering interest on our prepublication program, listed at less than 1/10th of the retail price of the print volumes! The prepub has been well received, but we still need a few more orders to confirm that there is enough interest in getting the best Septuagint available into Logos Bible Software. So if you were sitting on the fence with this one wondering what you’d get that isn’t already in Rahlfs’ or Swete’s LXX, the A-Text of Esther is one example of the cool, useful things you’ll only see in Göttingen.
P.S. If you’re interested in the Septuagint, you might take a peek at Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 Vols.), which contains three volumes on the Septuagint: Swete’s classic Introduction (which examines the Lucianic recension on pages 80-86), the introductory grammar and chrestomathy by Conybeare and Stock and the reference grammar by Thackeray. If you want to lock in the early bird price, now is the time.

Logos 4: Cross Reference Lookup Bible

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

When I studied with print books I had an old, well-used Bible on my desk. This Bible’s sole purpose was to look up Bible cross references. Because it was “broken in,” I could quickly turn the pages to a desired location. My new Bible always stayed open to the passage I was studying and then it would go to the pulpit with me. With Logos 4 you can designate a “cross reference look-up” Bible while staying in the same location in another Bible. Here’s how it works:

Scattered throughout your Logos resources are hyperlinked Bible cross references. Normally when you click a link your Preferred Bible will look up the passage. You can override that default by designating a “target Bible.”

  • Click the panel menu in your secondary Bible. It can be another copy of your Preferred Bible or a completely different Bible.
  • From the panel menu select Send hyperlinks here. Notice a target image appears on the panel menu.

Now when you click a Bible cross reference in any resource, this Bible will jump to that location!

Which Commentary is Best?

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Steve Runge, a scholar-in-residence at Logos Bible Software and author of the Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament, Lexham High Definition New Testament, and the forthcoming Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

I get asked this question a lot, a people seems somewhat disappointed by my response of “It depends on what you’re doing.” It’s like being asked what the best tool is in my garage: the answer will always be “the tool best suited to my task,” depending on what I’m doing. Here’s what I mean.

When tackling a tough passage I’ll typically consult scholarly commentaries like the Anchor-Yale Bible or International Critical Commentary volumes, and even from the forthcoming Continental Commentary Series among others. I can guess your first question: “Why in the world would I want to read Claus Westermann on Genesis or Hans-Joachim Kraus on the Psalms, aren’t these guys pioneers in source and form criticism?” Why yes, as a matter of fact they are. But they also knew their Hebrew better than most folks alive today, and they have spent most of their lives studying these books in far greater detail than I ever will. I may not share their presuppositions about Scripture, but there is much to commend their exegesis.

One of the biggest hurdles I had to overcome in seminary was being willing to learn from someone with whom I disagreed with on certain issues. I learned to read past differences in order to learn from their expertise. In a previous post I mentioned the value of older commentaries, noting that many times you will find a more robust engagement of the text on works by Godet, Olshausen and Alford, who were not distracted by the modern issues that can preoccupy new commentators. But this is not to say there is never a time to interact with critical scholars. Like any tool, each one has its strengths and weaknesses, each contributes something to the process.

Before you get the wrong impression, you need to know that I also make regular use of more devotional commentaries. The Focus on the Bible Commentaries and Christian Focus Biblical Studies Collection are great examples. Getting the difficult exegetical questions answered is not all there is to studying a passage, you also need to be able to clearly and relevantly communicate what you have learned. If you like the academic side of things like me, you too may struggle with seeing the bigger picture of a passage: the theme, flow or theology of a passage or book. I can have all the greatest information in the world, but it is useless to the congregation if I cannot present it in a way that they can understand.

Most often the more technical issues never get mentioned in the sermon, but are more about me feeling like I have handled them. Less-academically oriented commentaries—yes, even the warm fuzzy ones—are a great safeguard against missing the “forest” because of looking too closely at a piece of bark on a single “tree”. I read devotional commentaries just a critically as I do the scholarly ones, sifting wheat from chaff.

So which commentaries are best? The ones that you need for what you are working on. Just like I use my hand saw for some applications and an axe for another, building a diverse collection of commentaries can be a great boon to your study. The academically-oriented volumes can address specific questions, whereas the “lighter” ones can provide great ideas for how best to present what you have found.

Get the Faithlife Study Bible—for free!

More insights like this are waiting for you in the Faithlife Study Bible—the world’s largest study Bible. And it’s totally free—get it now!

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Taking Advantage of Video Tutorials

Video Tutorial

We are amassing quite a collection of feature and tutorial videos for Logos 4. At present, there are over 80 videos covering a variety of topics aimed at helping you get the most out of your Logos 4 experience. If you are looking for some help understanding things like Passage Guides, Layout Management, or Customizable Guides these video tutorials provide a wellspring of information. Would you believe there are six videos alone aimed at helping you use the Notes feature to the fullest!?

We would love to see all Logos 4 users seeing these videos as a valuable tool in their Logos 4 arsenal. Each video is—on average—a four minute investment into using your Logos 4 software to its fullest. An investment which is promised to pay huge dividends in your devotions and study time. In fact, we are so convinced of this that we intend to feature these videos here on the blog site on a semi-regular basis. Stay on the look out for more featured tutorials.

Before You Install Logos 4

If you are considering an upgrade—or a first time purchase of any Logos 4 Base Package—then you are going to want to take a couple of minutes and watch this video. It will walk you through installation, setup, your Logos.com account, resource downloads, and indexing. This video is a great tool to help kick off your Logos 4 experience.