Celebrating 50,000 Forum Users

Considering how popular Facebook and Twitter are, it may surprise you to discover that there’s another social community growing about nine times faster than either of these—the Logos Forums. (You read that right: Nine times faster than the ubiquitous, über-popular Facebook and Twitter!)

In fact, one member calculated that the forum community has grown at the rate of 66 users a day and nearly 2,000 new users a month for the past year!

What makes the forums so popular?

Simply put, the forums are one of the best ways to learn about Logos the software and Logos the company.

In the forums you’ll find all sorts of helpful and exciting things. You’ll find:

  • tips, tricks and workarounds to tackle Bible study problems
  • advice on which resources will help you the most from people who already own the them
  • screenshots and videos explaining about how to do things with Logos 4 you didn’t even know where possible
  • a community that likes to share encouragement and insights from their own study
  • tips on what great deals are available at any give time
  • a group of users more than ready to help you push an exciting Community Pricing or Pre-Pub title into production
  • comments straight from Logos about what our plans are and why we do things the way we do
  • opportunities to give feedback to Logos that helps direct the future of the software and company
  • much, much more!

And if you can’t find any of the above in the forums already, all you have to do is ask. With other users in literally every time zone around the world, the odds are pretty good you can get an answer in a couple hours if not in mere minutes.

No wonder the forums are growing so fast! They’re better able to handle all things Logos than any other social channel.

Cause to Celebrate

Just this past week we reached 50,000 forum users. To celebrate, we put together Forum Week—a week of great deals and fun “events” to show new users what this community is all about.

Since this is Forum Week, we decided the best place to post the deals and events (there will be prizes) is right in the forums themselves.

To take part, simply head over http://community.logos.com and look for the forum called “***Forum Week***” at the top of the page. But note, you must be logged in to your free www.logos.com account in order to be able to see this special forum and take part in the festivities.

A Landmark Event Deserves a Great Deal!

To kick things off, we’re offering an incredible discount on Camp Logos Live. Since much of the forum conversation is learning oriented, there couldn’t be a more fitting title to discount in honor of the community than the #1 tool for getting more out of Logos Bible Software 4. For the forum-exclusive price, be sure to check out Forum Week.

Make sure you check in early and often! Some of the deals and events are time sensitive and will be announced without warning.

Theologically Sound

Summer is quickly approaching and I couldn’t be more excited. I’m looking forward to the warm weather, the blooming flowers, and most of all, the summer concerts. Listening to live music is an energizing experience: As the music begins, you’re  immersed in sound and find yourself reflecting on the lyrics that accompany it. I often find myself trying to relate to the melody and words that accompany it.

Music has always been a powerful form of communication. Musician and theologian Jeremy Begbie examines the connection between theological reflection and musical expression in Resounding Truth: Christian Wisdom in the World of Music .

In this study, Begbie looks at Scripture, musical history, and contemporary culture to show how the reader—and listener—can discover God’s truth in the music all around them.

Here’s what others are saying about Resounding Truth:

Jeremy Begbie is a musician/theologian par excellence. Whatever music you enjoy and wherever you are on the journey of faith and understanding, he will delight, surprise, challenge, and inspire you. A wonderful book by a wonderful writer, thinker, and musician.
N. T. Wright, Bishop of Durham

Jeremy Begbie’s thinking emerges out of a fusion of the best musical thinking about theology and the best theological thinking about music. The resulting text is charged with energy and insight—and not just for musicians and theologians. This vital work is poised to energize and strengthen the entire Christian community.
—John D. Witvliet, Calvin Institute of Christian Worship

This book resounds with the thoughtful, dynamic, and always engaging voice of Jeremy Begbie. Marked by a breathtaking range, driven by a creative vision, and packed with judicious insights, it will no doubt shape conversations about theology and the arts for year to come.
—Roger Lundin, Wheaton College

Make sure you order Resounding Truth while it’s still on Pre-Pub!

What’s your favorite thing about music? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

Natural Disasters, Oil Spills, & Providence

Seminary Scholarship Winner: Eddie PainterAwarding scholarships to our SeminaryScholarship.com and BibleCollegeScholarship.com applicants has become an exciting opportunity for us to gain a little insight into winners’ lives.

Last time, we learned about Charissa M.’s desire to live in a third-world country. The time before that, we received very appreciative follow-up email from Joseph K. and his family which explained a little about how receiving the scholarship was a blessing and answer to prayer.

Our latest SeminaryScholarship.com winner, Gene (Eddie) Painter (New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary), and latest BibleCollegeScholarship.com winner, Jenna Guthmiller (Biola University) have provided similar appreciation. While corresponding with Eddie, we learned that his recent past reads like a sequence of newspaper headlines. Eddie, his wife, and his daughter attend NOBTS. In his own words, here is the path they’ve taken to get there:

In 2006, God made it plain that He wanted me to continue my education. I resigned the church where I was pastoring and moved my family to New Orleans. We were in the first group of families to move on campus after Hurricane Katrina. During those first months, I worked for UPS and campus police while going to school full time.

In April 2007, God called me to pastor Barataria Baptist Church, about 20 miles from New Orleans. This is a community on the bayou with many commercial fishermen who have lived here all their lives. In early 2008, I bought a boat and began crabbing as a means of becoming a part of the community.

In September 2008, Hurricane Ike flooded our community and we lost our home. Many thought we wouldn’t return. However, God called us here and we were back (living in a Sunday School room) within days. This really cemented us as a true part of the community. God continued to bless my crabbing during this time also. (Here’s a link to a local article written during that time.) God also greatly blessed us in restoring our home. The church put in a new modular home and generous fellow Christians donated so that we could buy furniture for it. We moved into our new home in August 2009.

When the oil spill hit in 2010, we wondered what would happen. I couldn’t crab for the summer to earn money for tuition. My wife had two part-time jobs and lost both of them. That’s when God opened another door. My boat was hired to work the oil spill. I wasn’t able to captain the boat, so I hired a captain and deckhand. Because of this great blessing, we were able to pay off debt and my wife began working at NOBTS on degree in counseling.

God has been faithful to us. Last fall, our daughter was called to the music ministry. This fall, three of our family members will be at NOBTS. I sometimes wonder how we will manage to pay for this, but your scholarship was evidence that God is still providing!

Gene (Eddie) Painter

Over the past five years, Eddie and his family have had first-hand exposure to some of the United States’ major headline events, yet he sums it up with, "your scholarship was evidence that God is still providing!"

It is such a blessing to learn our scholarships are blessing winners. As both Eddie and Jenna will likely read this, why not take a second to leave a comment and congratulate them on being our latest winners?

Then, consider applying yourself. Hopefully next time we will be able to hear your story. But we won’t hear it if you don’t first apply.

Going to Seminary? www.SeminaryScholarship.com
Going to Bible College? www.BibleCollegeScholarship.com

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 2

SproulThis is the second half to last week’s Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1 by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Using Lectionary Resources in Logos Bible Software

Lectionary resources in Logos Bible Software are designed to make it easy to find the text for the day and to read it in the Bible translation of your choice.

The readings are arranged by calendar date and the book automatically opens at the next set of readings. For each Sunday or feast, the title, the season and the liturgical color is given. The text of the readings for the day is displayed in the translation you specify at the top of the panel, and links are provided that you can use to open your Bible or right-click to quickly open up Logos guides, tools and searches for deeper study and sermon preparation. (Click the images to see them full size.)

Lectionary Readings for the Day

For more general study, you can also find a complete listing of readings organized by liturgical event (i.e. more like a print lectionary that you can re-use year to year) in the “Index of Readings” found at the end of the lectionary.

The home page ribbon also gives you quick access to your lectionary. It displays the title and readings for the next Sunday and opens up your lectionary when you click.

To get your preferred lectionary to show up, prioritize it from Library.

In addition, the “Lectionaries” section of the Passage Guide allows you to quickly see where the passage you’re studying appears in your lectionaries. How and where a passage is used in a lectionary reveals important ways that your passage has been used in worship in connection with other passages or important feasts.

Passage Guide

To get this section to show up in your Passage Guide, click “Add” on the Passage Guide title bar and select “Lectionaries”.

Helps & Commentaries Geared Toward the Lectionary

Besides the lectionary resources mentioned in Part I, Logos also has several commentaries and sermon preparation helps that are specifically geared toward use with a lectionary:

Do you use a lectionary? Leave us a comment and let us know which one.

Great Tools for Discipleship on Pre-Pub

When I am asked about my discipleship as a young Christian, I always end up talking about Jerry Bridges.

I was in my early twenties when I made my decision to follow Jesus. David—a man in my church who took discipleship seriously—quickly took me under his wing. He gave me a dog-eared copy of Bridges’ The Pursuit of Holiness and asked me to meet him on the following morning to go over the first chapter.

We met nearly every Monday morning for the next three years. After wrapping up The Pursuit of Holiness, we went on to read The Practice of Godliness. Jerry Bridges became such a big part of those early years that when I think back, it is almost as if Bridges was with us—counseling, instructing, and convicting.

I recently read through the notes I had scrawled in the margins of those books, and I was struck by their action-oriented nature, things like: “Make this my prayer,” “Memorize  this verse,” and “Resolve this!” These weren’t just theoretical meditations on theological principles (although it was that too), they were the nuts and bolts of applied discipleship.

Ten years later I was the one discipling college students, and I was leading them through Bridges’ books.  I can honestly say, I have read every book in the 15 volume Jerry Bridges Collection with a student at one time or another.

One of my favorites in this collection—and one I have used more than a couple times—is Respectable Sins: Confronting the Sins We Tolerate. In Respectable Sins, Bridges reminds us to be mindful of our internal posture and outlook. It may be the overt sins that will trip us up, but it’s the deep-seated conditions of the heart which can poison and blind us over time. In a real and vulnerable way, Bridges reveals how he has identified sins like envy, selfishness, and pride in his own heart, and offers practical solutions to combating those conditions we tend to ignore or explain away in ourselves. In this book full of conviction and encouragement, we are reminded that, although we all fall short, there is no excuse to grow complacent in our attitude towards sin.

The strength of these books lie in their ability to be simple without being simplistic. I have found them to be powerful tools for deep, reflective discussions more times than I can count. If you do your own discipleship, have a Bible study or home group, or even want to get back to the practical aspects of your own personal faith, this collection is a must.

Six of the fifteen volumes in the Jerry Bridges Collection are study/discussion guides. By reflecting on, discussing, and responding to these guides you can compound on Bridges’ already practical content and really delve into its personal application—whether you are using them alone or in a group.

Three of the study guides are for books which have been available from Logos for some time but are not in this collection. If you already have a copy of The Pursuit of Holiness (only $6.00 on Logos.com!), The Practice of Godliness, or Trusting God: Even When Life Hurts for Logos 4 then you’ll want to add the Jerry Bridges Collection (15 vols.) to your resources. Otherwise you can get the collection while it is at its discounted Pre-Pub price, and pick up the other books at your leisure.

Have you led any one through one of Jerry Bridges books, or used it in your own spiritual formation? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!


Logos 4: Clear Your Desktop with One Click

mp|seminars TipsLast Monday’s blog, “Quickly Clean Up a Messy Desktop,” generated some good discussion. One particular comment, given by a Mr. Joe Bella, gave another user a tip for clearing their screen using the Close all command.

We give many tips and shortcuts throughout Camp Logos and in the Camp Logos LIVE DVDs, and this is one of those tips!

There will be times when you are using Logos 4 that you’ll want to clear all of the open resources, tools, and guides that are open on your screen. You can either close each panel individually or use a shortcut:

  • In the Command box, type close all

If you press Enter, the screen will clear. But what if you wanted that command on your Shortcuts bar?

  • Type close all in the Command box (do not press Enter) (See image 1.)
  • Click and drag the Close all command to your Shortcuts bar (See image 2.)

Image 1:

Close-All Toolbar

Image 2:

Close-All Toolbar

You’ll now see a Close all icon on your Shortcuts bar. Whenever you want to clear your screen, just click the icon!

Close-All Toolbar

Do you use your Shortcuts toolbar? If yes, what are some of your favorite shortcuts? Let us know by leaving us a comment.

The Feature-Filled Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament

The Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament (ACNT), on prepub now, is truly a resource for all. It offers something for everyone: Students can explore basic messages of the New Testament books and use the commentaries as a research tool for papers; Laypeople will find the commentaries helpful for personal or group Bible study; and pastors can use the commentaries for sermon and lesson preparation.

By explaining the text of the New Testament section by section, the fifteen volume Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament aims to bring the best of biblical scholarship on some of the most vital issues in the New Testament.

Each volume in the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament is loaded with these great features:

  • Introduction and topical overview of the New Testament book
  • Analysis of the book’s influence in church history
  • Discussion of textual issues
  • Review of historical topics like authorship and dating
  • Investigation of literary conventions and exegetical and interpretive challenges
  • List of other helpful resources like books, articles, and reference works for further study

Appealing to all, the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament is a great addition to your Bible study library. Not only will Scripture references in the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament be linked to the Greek New Testament or your English translation, you can also link the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament to other commentaries in your library. Be sure to grab the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament while it’s on Pre-Pub!

Have you used any of the Augsburg New Testament commentaries? Leave us a comment and tell us about it.

Logos Wins Prestigious Software Industry Award

Logos Bible Software 4: 2011 CODiE Award WinnerLogos Bible Software 4 has been named the winner of the SIIA’s prestigious CODiE Award for Best Educational Reference Solution.

With the release of Logos Bible Software 4 back in November 2009, we knew we had something special. Logos 4 was all-new. It was like no other product out in the marketplace, and like no other product we had produced before. We knew we had introduced a brand new award-wining software. It just wasn’t offical, until now.

Logos 4 has just been recognized by the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) as the Best Educational Reference Solution.

Since 1986, the SIIA’s CODiE Awards program has showcased the software and information industry’s finest products. The award holds the distinction of being the software industry’s only peer-reviewed award as SIIA members are comprised of leading companies in the business software, digital content, and education technology industries. Throughout the award’s history, this is the first time Bible study software has not only been named a finalist, but has also gone on to win the SIIA’s CODiE Award in its category.

Due to the large undertaking in rebuilding Logos from the ground up—instead of simply reusing 15–20-year old code for an update—we hoped Logos users would find Logos 4 to exceed their expectations. It did. Logos users quickly navigated past the initial learning curve Logos 4 posed, and discovered a new way of doing Bible study. And the CODiE Award judges got to see exactly what makes Logos 4 so special.

Judges put Logos 4 through a stringent review process consisting of evaluating product-specific material and online support articles and training videos. Finally, a live online product demonstration was coordinated so judges could see a first-hand demonstration before evaluating and scoring Logos 4. Part of the evaluation focused on the program’s customization features, ease of use, navigation, richness and focus of search results, and use of graphics, among other components.

Based on the above components, Logos Bible Software 4 seemed to be exactly what the Best Educational Reference Solution category was intended for. Among others in the same category, Logos 4 beat out NBC News Archives on Demand from NBC Learn.

Some 425 products and services were nominated this year. Then third-party judges reviewed and evaluated each item before determining finalists. SIIA members then reviewed the finalists and voted to select the winners.

Winning the 2011 CODiE Award now puts Logos Bible Software in the company of past CODiE Award winners such as Adobe, Dell, Cision, Red Hat, SalesForce, Wall Street Journal Professional, and Zendesk.

In the nearly twenty years Logos Bible Software has been around, winning the CODiE Award is a crowning achievement for an excellent product, but more so, for the world-class team here at Logos who is dedicated to providing the best Bible study tool available.

Moving forward, we are committed more than ever to excellence and to being a leader in educational technology. Please leave a comment letting us know how Logos Bible Software 4 has changed the way you do Bible study. And if you are still haven’t upgraded to Logos 4, isn’t it time you discovered what you’re missing?

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1


What is a Lectionary?

A lectionary is a book or list of selections from Scripture (sometimes called “pericopes,” “lections,” or “lessons”) chosen for reading in public worship. The Christian practice of Scripture reading in public worship likely derived from the synagogue, and over time, in both Jewish and Christian traditions, the pericopes associated with the different Sabbaths or Sundays and other celebrations of the year were fixed and compiled in books and lists. For the traditions that use them, these lectionary pericopes often form the basis for preaching and provide themes for worship.

Who Uses a Lectionary?

Use of a lectionary is usually associated with the more liturgical traditions within Christianity, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism and Lutheranism. Nonetheless, in recent decades, some non-liturgical churches have also adopted optional or occasional use of a lectionary as a way of broadening the texts used for preaching or relating Sunday worship to the church year.

What are the Most Common Lectionaries in Use?

Until the 20th century, most Western Christian liturgical traditions used some derivative of the lectionary of the Roman Rite that took shape in the Middle Ages. This lectionary consists of an annual cycle of readings assigning an epistle and a Gospel pericope to each mass.

Lutherans and Anglicans reformed this lectionary in accord with Reformation understandings of Scripture and worship, while the reforms of the Council of Trent adjusted and standardized this lectionary for use in Catholic liturgy. These lectionaries are still used by some Lutheran and Anglican/Episcopalian congregations and in Catholic communities that celebrate the traditional Roman Rite.

Logos Bible Software base packages include two Lutheran Lectionaries that follow the traditional, one year, format: the Christian Worship One Year Lectionary from the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary from the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

In the 1960s, the lectionary for the Roman Rite in the Catholic Church was revised in response to the Second Vatican Council’s call for more extensive use of Scripture in the liturgy. The traditional lectionary was replaced with a three year cycle of three readings for Sundays and major feasts days and a two year cycle of two readings for daily mass. For most of the year, the Sunday cycle consists of an Old Testament reading, a non-Gospel New Testament reading and a Gospel reading. The lectionary also supplies a Responsorial Psalm that follows the first reading.

This arrangement found favor not just in the Catholic Church but among Protestants as well, and many churches began adopting versions of it. The ecumenical collaboration of the Consultation on Common Texts eventually resulted in the Revised Common Lectionary in 1992, which today is the most commonly used lectionary among English-speaking Protestants. As a consequence of this development, the same texts are proclaimed, reflected and preached upon on any given Sunday in congregations around the world and across many Christian traditions.

Logos Bible Software base packages include six of these modern three-year lectionaries:

Are the use of lectionaries important to you in your private or public worship? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Next week we will look at using lectionary resources in Logos 4.

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Dig Deeper into the Word(s)

Today’s guest post is by Elise Bryant, from the Logos Bible Software Accounting department.

I feel like I’ve grown spiritually by listening to radio ministries. Three of my favorite teachers are Beth Moore, Kay Arthur and Nancy Leigh DeMoss. I’d hear them constantly refer to Greek and Hebrew—the languages that the Bible was first written in—to unlock the depth and beauty of Scripture. By doing word studies, they seemed to uncover the meaning of so many words that get lost in translation. Can I learn how to do the same thing in Logos? How can I follow along with them to know what they are saying is accurate?

What you just read came out of an email I sent out to my co-workers at Logos a while ago. My name is Elise Bryant and I work in the Accounting department at Logos. It’s funny, but even though I work here, I wasn’t familiar with our software. I just didn’t know how to use it to understand Scripture on a deeper level. So I asked my co-workers for some help.
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