Get 40% Off Logos March Madness Round 3 Books

Logos March Madness’ third round featured some of the closest matchups yet, but the results are in. Eight more authors have been eliminated, and you can get 40% off selected works by:

  • F.F. Bruce
  • Millard Erickson
  • William Barclay
  • Martyn Lloyd-Jones
  • R.C. Sproul
  • Charles Spurgeon
  • Scot McKnight
  • Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Save 40% on more than 150 round 3 deals!

Vote for your favorites in round 4

Each round of Logos March Madness has featured close matchups, so don’t forget to vote for your favorites. Winners in this round advance to the Final 4—and eliminated authors have selected works discounted by 45%.

Round 4 (Elite 8) matchups:

  • N.T. Wright vs. J.I. Packer
  • Darrell L. Bock vs. D.A. Carson
  • Leon Morris vs. A.W. Tozer
  • G.K. Beale vs. Douglas Moo

Voting ends March 20 at 5:00 p.m. (PST)—vote now!

See Philippians in a Whole New Light

animated-high-definition-commentary-philippiansMany of you have already discovered the High Definition Commentary series and have found it to be a highly approachable, illustrative commentary. These one-of-a-kind resources use principles of linguistics and biblical exegesis to illuminate key principles and the overall message of Scripture. With the amazing slides included in the High Definition Commentaries, you’re seeing these key principles in a completely new way.

Lexham Press is excited to announce a new way to experience the High Definition Commentary series: the Animated High Definition Commentary: Philippians. We’ve taken the stationary slides and created stunning animations of these key principles, making these resources more accessible than ever!

The Animated High Definition Commentary: Philippians is now available on Pre-Pub—pre-order yours today.

Bring Philippians to life!

With material adapted from High Definition Commentary: Philippians, here’s a sample of what you’ll get:

These animations will cover the complete book and are expected to be around 90 minutes long.

A complete multimedia experience

Imagine working through the book of Philippians with these animations bringing the text to life. The narrator will help you examine the linguistic and literary clues in the text while the visuals help illustrate and apply the text. Dr. Steve Runge’s applicable and approachable examples throughout the text will come to life right before your eyes! These videos are perfect for a small group or your own individual Bible study.

And, if you already own the High Definition Commentary: Philippians, these animations will be integrated so that the resource becomes a complete multimedia experience.

Take advantage of this special offer

If you already own the original High Definition Commentary: Philippians and you pre-order the new Animated High Definition Commentary: Philippians, you’ll get a $10.00 promotional code when it ships.

If you haven’t purchased the original yet, now’s the perfect time! You can get it for 30% off during Logos March Madness, and you’ll still be eligible for a $10.00 promotional code when you purchase both versions.

Pre-order the Animated High Definition Commentary: Philippians today!

Logos 6: Attach the Same Note to Different Places

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

As you well know, the same biblical events are often mentioned in multiple places in the Bible. For example, Jesus’ prayer in Gethsemane is recorded in Matthew, Mark, and Luke.

Let’s imagine we’re working our way through Mark when we come to the phrase “this cup” in Mark 14:36. We want to record our insights, so we create a note for Mark 14:36. During our research, however, we discover this same phrase also appears in Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42. Rather than creating two more separate notes, we can actually attach the same original note to the other two verses with a feature known as an attachment point.

Here’s how to get started with this power-user trick:

First, create the original note:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the file something like “Notes on the Gospels” (A)
  • Make sure the view is set to Full (B)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-1

  • Open a Bible to Mark 14:36
  • Right click any word in Mark 14:36 (C)
  • Select Mark 14:36 from the context menu (D)
  • Select Add a note to “Notes on the Gospels” (E)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-2

  • Notice Logos creates, in the file, an individual note named “Mark 14:36” (F) with a Content box underneath it (G)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-3

  • Type your research in the Content box—for example, The demonstrative pronoun “this” implies nearness or being close at hand. (H)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-4

  • Notice Logos places a note indicator in the Bible next to Mark 14:36 (I)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-5

  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to see a pop-up preview of the note content (J)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-6
Next, add the attachment points:

  • Rest the cursor on the name of the note, “Mark 14:36” (K)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-7

  • Click the arrow link that appears to the far right of the note (L)
  • Select Edit attachment points (M)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-8

  • Type Matthew 26:39 in the reference box (N)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (O)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-9

  • Type Luke 22:42 in the reference box (P)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (Q)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-10

  • Click Done to close the attachment-points box (R)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-11

  • Navigate to Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42 in the Bible and notice a note indicator next to each verse (S)

morris-proctor-attach-the-same-note-to-different-places-12

Now regardless of which account of Jesus’ prayer you’re reading, you’ll have your insights about “this cup” right there with you!

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.

Logos March Madness: Round 2 Discounts Are Live!

Round-2-Deals_400x400

After a week of fierce face-offs, round 2 has come to a close and round 3 has begun.

The number of competitors has been cut in half—now you can save 35% on hundreds of select titles from:

  • John Piper
  • Gordon Fee
  • Michael Horton
  • Craig Evans
  • John MacArthur
  • And 11 others . . .

Don’t wait—get these deals today!

Round 3 is here!

Vote today for your favorite third-round authors! Increase the chances of seeing your favorites move to the next round: let your friends know who you’re rooting for and show them where to vote.

The competition is heating up: vote now!

Help Bring the Logos App to the Windows Phone!

windows-universal-bible-appYou asked, and we listened. We get a lot of requests to make the Logos app available on Windows phones and tablets, and we want to make it happen.

If you want the Logos app for download on your windows device, you can help fund its development! Simply go to the Windows Universal Bible App Community Pricing page and bid the amount you’re willing to pay for the app’s production.

What’s Community Pricing?

Community Pricing lets you bid the amount you want to pay based on what interests you. It’s the best way to get great deals on new Logos products.

Here’s how it works:

When you select an amount to bid, your bid will help pay for the development of the Windows app. There’s no risk—you can cancel your bid at any time, and your card will not be charged until the development costs are covered for the the app (we’ll even send you a reminder email before you’re charged).

Take your Logos library anywhere

Enhance your Bible study and depth of your Bible knowledge on the go! From Windows, Android, iOS, or Kindle to your main desktop, the Windows Universal Bible App will sync your notes and highlights across all of your devices.

Not only will the app sync with your Logos library, but you’ll also get free access to over 70 Bible translations and helpful resources—plus smart study tools that let you explore important ideas and make connections across the text.

Your Windows Phone could be loaded with amazing features:

  • Dig deep into biblical texts and learn about any word by examining dictionaries, lexicons, and cross-references.
  • Run verse-specific reports that pull in relevant commentaries, cross-references, literary typing, and media resources.
  • Compare any verse with up to five translations, see the contrast with visual and percentage indicators of difference, and view resources side by side with your preferred Bible translation.
  • Mark verses and quotes with comments and questions.
  • Share meaningful verses on Facebook, Twitter, or your Faithlife Groups!

Don’t wait—bid on this app today and help fund its development.

Spread the word!

Community Pricing relies on community. The more people who bid on this app will help drive down the price you pay in order to make it more affordable. So spread the word, tell your friends about it, and help us fund the development of the Windows Universal Bible App!

Bid on the Windows app today!

Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe & More: Get 80% Off!

library-of-early-english-historyGet a firsthand look at English life and literature in the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries with the Library of Early English History. This massive collection comprises more than 25,000 commonly cited texts, giving you a wealth of resources for historical or literary study.

Examine great works of literature in a new way

Spanning from 1461 to 1683, this collection features early editions of some of English literature’s greatest works, including Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Malory’s Morte d’Arthur, William Shakespeare’s plays, Christopher Marlowe’s works, and many other plays, poems, and romances. You’ll also get a look at how English writers interpreted the classics, with Renaissance-era translations of ancient Greek and Roman works of literature. And Logos’ tools make it easy to look up unfamiliar terms or compare these early editions to others in your library.

Primary sources at your fingertips

In addition to classic literature, this collection also includes a wide range of royal statutes and proclamations; military, religious, legal, and Parliamentary documents; sermons; homilies; liturgies; and more. Look at everything from daily life to the decisions that shaped English history. Search the archive for any mention of specific people or places, easily finding what you want to know. These documents will enrich your study of any aspect English history—and with Logos, you can automatically cite your sources. These documents also give you invaluable context for studying literary works. Understand the political, social, and religious background behind works we still read today—and see them in a whole new light.

The Logos advantage

Whether you’re interested in history or literature, the Library of Early English History is an invaluable addition to your studies. And Logos’ research tools make it that much better. Search the archive quickly, study related texts side by side, and more. For a limited time, pre-order the Library of Early English History for only $249.95—80% off the regular price.

Don’t miss your chance to save on this amazing resource. Pre-order yours today!

Pro Tips: Factbook and Bible Book Guides

factbook-collectionLogos 6 cuts straight to the meat of Bible study.

Let’s say you wanted to begin a study of the first letter to Timothy. How would you begin such a study using Logos?

With paper-and-ink books, you’d have to open up each individual commentary on Timothy and read through their introductions to begin to get a grasp on this Pauline epistle—then you’d open up your Bible dictionaries to learn about Timothy and his relationship with Paul.

Even in Logos, one might be tempted to open up each commentary individually and begin reading. But this doesn’t save time—it’s actually no different than owning all of the print volumes on Timothy and studying manually.

Where the Factbook comes in

The Factbook sorts relevant information on the Bible’s books and characters so that you can begin any study with ease.

For example, you can get instant access to what your library has to say about the authorship and date of composition of 1 Timothy or the major themes running through this epistle. You can also look up Paul’s disciple Timothy and get links to all the articles on him in your dictionaries and encyclopedias. Everything you want to know about Timothy, the date of composition of 1 Timothy, and on the themes of the epistle is all a click away.

Search results coming up empty?

We’ve always said that a bigger library brings better results.

If your Factbook results are looking slim, we recommend expanding your library with more reference works, especially high-profile commentaries, such as the Word Biblical Commentary, the New American Commentary, and the International Critical Commentary, or dictionary series that pay dividends in the long term, such as The IVP Bible Dictionaries Series.

And now we’ve made it even easier to get the results you want with Factbook. With the Factbook Collection, you’ll get 22 volumes of commentaries, Bible handbooks, and dictionaries that are each specifically tagged to bring articles into your Factbook.1 You’ll boost your study with such works as the revised International Standard Bible Dictionary (ISBE), the Tyndale Concise Bible Commentary, the Holman Concise Bible Commentary, and the Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible.

Not only will you get top-notch reference works, but in this collection they come at a deeply discounted price. The ISBE alone would cost you $129.95, so for $80 more you can add 18 other modern dictionaries and commentaries to your library and round out your study with expert research on any biblical topic. And if you already own any of these volumes, your own custom price will be even lower!

Get detailed Bible study delivered to your fingertips

Get the Factbook Collection today and grow your library’s research capacity at an unbeatable price!

  1. This collection does not contain the Logos 6 software that comes with each base package. A Logos 6 base package or crossgrade is required to access the Factbook tool, and for best performance, we recommend Logos 6 Bronze or higher. []

Celebrate Geerhardus Vos’ Birthday with His Reformed Dogmatics

young VosMarch 14 marks Geerhardus Vos’ 153rd birthday. To celebrate, you can take 20% off his Reformed Dogmatics. Now you can benefit from this profoundly influential work, newly translated into English.

The father of Reformed biblical theology

Geerhardus Vos was born in 1862 in Heerenveen in the Netherlands. At 19, he moved to America and began his education at Calvin Theological Seminary, Princeton Theological Seminary, and Strassburg University.

In 1888, Vos accepted a position on the Calvin Theological Seminary faculty and began delivering a series of lectures on dogmatics. These lectures would come to form the backbone of his Reformed Dogmatics. He would go on to join the faculty of Princeton Theological Seminary and would author his most famous works while there—coming to be known as the father of Reformed biblical theology.

“Like a lost Shakespeare play recently discovered”

With Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics translated into English, you’re now able to explore the relationship between Vos’ early thoughts in systematic theology with his later work in biblical theology. Vos himself commented on the positive and complementary relationship between the two disciplines. Indeed, Vos’ strong grounding in biblical scholarship and biblical theology makes his Reformed Dogmatics unique.

Michael Horton said that the translation of Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics is “like a lost Shakespeare play recently discovered.” A fresh biblical perspective to this systematic theology gives this work a broad appeal to academics, students, pastors, and those with a great interest in biblical theology.

Learn from Vos’ unique perspective: get 20% off his Reformed Dogmatics today!

Dr. Cynthia Briggs Kittredge on Why You Need Another Commentary

fortress-commentary-on-the-bibleRecently, we spoke with Dr. Cynthia Briggs Kittredge about the Fortress Commentary on the Bible, an exciting two-volume commentary that’s now available on Pre-Pub.

Here’s what she had to say about this resource:

Why a two-volume commentary set? Aren’t there enough multivolume commentaries to satisfy the average reader?

I’ve said to myself in the past: “The world doesn’t need another Bible commentary—therefore, don’t ever write one!” However, I made an exception for this project because of its hermeneutical perspective, one that is akin to what I have been teaching in my Bible classes in the seminary setting. Interpretation requires a process of attending to and negotiating between the text in its historical setting, the “world in front of the text,” the history of interpretation and commentary, and contemporary concerns and theological questions. Levels A, B, and C address those dimensions in a way that is accessible and helpful to the reader who is not an expert.

Did the editors work to coordinate views across the two volumes? Across books?

The editors did not aim at a single viewpoint, but sought creative and engaged scholars who would be enthusiastic about the challenge to focus on history, reception, and current ethical conversations with the biblical text.

You worked primarily on the New Testament. What are some of the highlights of this volume?

Yes, I worked on the NT volume, while my coeditors recruited the authors for each book. Then I was responsible for editing particular articles. I particularly recommend Deborah Krause’s articles on 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, Sylvia Keesmaat’s Colossians, and Jaime Clark-Soles’ chapters on the Johannine epistles. Of special interest to me is Neil Elliott’s introduction to Paul’s letters: “Situating the Apostle Paul in his Day and Engaging his Legacy as Our Own.” Elliott states eloquently the interpretive challenge and promise of reading these influential letters today.

* * *

The Fortress Commentary on the Bible is now available on Pre-Pub. Save over 30% when you pre-order this new resource today!

Is God the Origin of Evil?

mobile-ed-david-w-baker-old-testament-bundleLast week we had the privilege of working with Dr. David Baker in the Mobile Ed studio, filming a few of his upcoming courses on the Old Testament.

Dr. Baker is a highly respected Old Testament scholar and prolific author. Some of his works include The NIV Application Commentary: Joel, Obadiah, Malachi and the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch.

Dr. Baker answers the question “Is God the origin of evil?” by explaining the context of Amos 3:3–8 in this video from OT232 A Survey of Amos, Joel, Obadiah, and Malachi:

Watch more video clips from Dr. Baker’s two-course Mobile Ed: David W. Baker Old Testament Bundle, and add these courses to your library today!