The Art of Divine Twittering

ref.lyHow many Twitter followers do you have? Five? Twenty-five? One thousand!? Think about how many of those followers are walking through any number of the difficulties that life tends to toss our way. Consider how many of them just need to hear some encouragement. Maybe today would be a good time to send out a favorite, encouraging scripture or two. Perhaps you have a verse which has so inspired you it has become your life-verse and is the kind of support that someone might need today. Ref.ly was created to meet such a need.

With ref.ly you can provide a short link to that verse that has been on your mind and send followers directly to that passage at Bible.Logos.com.

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Announcing the Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library

Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library (28 Vols.)

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library is the third major component to the Anchor Yale Bible Group, which also includes the Anchor Yale Bible and the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary. The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary has been available for Logos Bible Software for a few years, and the Anchor Yale Bible became available earlier this year. Now we’re set to begin work on the remaining books in the Anchor Yale Bible Group—the Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library.

The 28 volumes in this collection cover a wide variety of sub-disciplines in the broader field of biblical studies, including books on archaeology, geography, history, languages and linguistics, philosophy, and theology, to name a few. These books present the best contemporary scholarship in a way that is accessible not only to scholars but also to educated non-specialists.

This series contains many books which have become classics in their fields:

  • The collection contains Raymond Brown’s volumes on the Passion Narrative and his Introduction to the Gospel of John. Brown’s book on John was intended to replace his 2-volume commentary in the Anchor Yale Bible, but the project was interrupted by his death in 1998. Francis J. Maloney edited Brown’s manuscript for publication, and it appeared in the Anchor Yale Reference Library in 2003.
  • John P. Meier’s 4-volume (and 3,102-page) work on the historical Jesus is also included in the collection. His books, along with N.T. Wright’s, are essential reading on the subject.
  • James H. Charlesworth’s 2-volume Old Testament Pseudepigrapha is a monumental work on Wisdom literature, Psalms, prayers, Judeo-Hellenistic works, and other pseudepigraphal literature.

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library has also attracted the attention of mainstream media outlets. Substantial reviews of some of these books have appeared in recent years in magazines like Newsweek and the New York Times.

These 28 volumes retail at roughly $1,300.00, but we’re initially offering them on Pre-Pub for $499.95. To put this in perspective on a smaller scale, the average retail price per volume is $46.09, but you can pick these up on Pre-Pub right now for $17.86 each. We can promise this price won’t last more than a few weeks, so make sure you place your order today.

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Reference Browser: A Scripture Index for All Your Books

Tips & Tricks blog SetToday’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

The Reference Browser is like a Scripture reference index in the back of a print book. Use it to locate occurrences of Bible verses in any Libronix e-book.

For example, open the Logos Hymnal. Now open the Reference Browser from the Go menu or use the keystroke shortcut Ctrl + R. Set the In box to the Logos Hymnal and the Type box to Bible. Type “Rev 19″ in the Find box and click Search.

You’ve just found all of the hymns based on Revelation 19.

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog or subscribe to the RSS feed.

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Windows Mobile users, speak up!

Do you have a Windows Mobile phone? If so, we’d appreciate your participation in a very short survey regarding specific devices.
If you have another type of mobile device, don’t worry, we’re thinking about your needs, too. Your input in the August survey has already been put to work!

Resources for Shepherds

Jesus was unequivocal; “In this world you will have trouble.” If you have at least one friend, then you know someone acquainted with grief. If you are in ministry then you don’t need to be told that our churches are filled with the hurting, the wounded, the sick and the lonely. In ministry, helping those who suffer is often the task for which we are least equipped.

The Christian Focus Counseling Collection is a great tool to augment your counseling/care skill set. Included are eight volumes from Christian Focus Publications that are perfect to enable you to revisit a whole host of care-driven ministry needs.

In this collection are books to:

  • Help you understand and minister to those suffering from depression with both a Biblical and medical understanding
  • Minister to the grieving through the lens of the Old Testament book of Lamentations
  • Provide a healthy, theological and balanced look at miraculous healing
  • Enable you to understand and minister to couple dealing with infertility issues
  • Empower you to provide pastoral visitations that are spiritually nourishing
  • Equip others with a self image that is based on a sound and uplifting Christian worldview

The beauty of having resources like this in your Logos Bible Software is that each word is essentially a link to more resources within your library and allowing deeper and more illuminating study. Scripture references are linked to your favorite translation and even original language resources. Studying has never been so uncomplicated and enriching.

If you are looking for more counseling resources for you library make sure you check out the Christian Counseling Product Guide!

Yes, Jesus was quite clear that “In this world you will have trouble.” And it is our sacred responsibility to ensure that we can flesh out his follow-up encouragement, “But take heart! I have overcome the world!

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An Interview with Professor Carl Bosma

Carl BosmaEnglish cleric and writer Charles Colton said, “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.” In this high-tech culture Colton’s aphorism might be updated to “Fidelity is the sincerest form of flattery.” Running into those true believers who use, love and cannot help but spread the word about Logos Bible Software is always flattering.

Meet Carl Bosma, ordained in the Christian Reformed Church in North America, church planter, leadership developer with Christian Reformed World Missions, Professor of Biblical studies at Seminario Presbiteriano do Sul, Sao Paulo, Brazil, Associate Professor of Old Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary, Th.D. candidate and Logos Bible Software user. In fact, Mr. Bosma wrote a very thorough and impressive manual for Libronix 3.0 that, although Logos wasn’t affiliated with, those of us who have perused it were very impressed.

I touched base with Prof. Bosma recently to get more information about this huge project:

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What’s in My Library: Bible (Literal)

Today’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars. In this series, Morris answers the question, “What’s in my library?”

English Standard VersionBible (Literal)

Definition: The Bible was originally written in the Hebrew and Greek languages. Our English Bibles are based on the Hebrew and Greek manuscripts. A literal translation of the Bible seeks as much as possible to give a word for word translation from Hebrew or Greek to English. Literal translations of the Bible should be used when conducting more serious Bible study.

Example: English Standard Version

Application: If you are not familiar with original languages, but want to do serious Bible study getting as close as possible to the original meaning of the text with an English Bible, then you want to rely on literal translations like the ESV, KJV, NKJV, or NASB.

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s mpSeminars website and his Tips & Tricks blog.

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Laughing All the Way to the West Bank

The medicinal benefits of laughing are well documented:

  • A good, strong laugh provides a heart rate increase equal to 15 minutes of biking
  • Laughter decreases stress and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving resistance to disease
  • Laughing helps to deepen breathing, improving respiration
  • A hearty laugh relieves tension, reduces stress and can leave your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes

It leaves one to wonder why, if there are so many advantages to laughing, is there so little levity in the Scriptures? Any physical benefits of laughing were designed and hardwired into us by the Creator himself, so would it be so difficult for him to tell a casual joke? To use the periodic pun? To exchange the occasional bon mot?

An article in Bible Study Magazine suggests that perhaps He did. Samuel Lamerson, Dean of
Faculty and Associate Professor of New Testament at Knox Seminary in Fort Lauderdale, proposes that perhaps the disconnect between us and the funnier comments and stories Jesus told is cultural—maybe we just don’t understand what they would have found funny in Palestine 2,000 years ago. He also suggests that perhaps we just don’t like the idea of a jovial Jesus and prefer to picture our Savior as a “man of many sorrows, acquainted with grief.” Lamerson walks us through some examples of stories Jesus told which his listeners would have found humor in, showing that Jesus may have been a little more wry than we would typically admit.

Bible Study Magazine provides many previews of these kinds of amazing articles, as well as interactive tools to accompany many of the articles in print. But subscribing today is the only way to ensure you don’t miss a single issue.

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John MacArthur Reveals Bible Study Methods


John MacArthur has been studying the Bible an average of 25–30 hours per week for most of his life, and at 70 years old, he shows no signs of slowing down.

A resolute believer in the dedicated study of Scripture to help Christians grow in their faith, he is a best-selling author, popular conference speaker and president of Grace to You—a non-profit organization overseeing his diverse multi-media outreach, including radio and television programs, website resources and more.

In the November–December issue of Bible Study Magazine, John MacArthur shares his advice on a wide variety of Bible study related topics.

In the interview, Dr. MacArthur answers such questions as:


  • When you open a Bible, what is the first thing you do?
  • How should someone with no experience whatsoever with Christianity or the church begin to study the Bible? What are some basic pointers you can offer them?
  • In what ways is the Old Testament applicable for today’s Christian? What about things like the sacrifices in Leviticus—how are they applicable?
  • How would you study the Bible with someone who does not have the conviction that it is the Word of God?
  • Why should we study the Bible?
  • What is the difference between reading the Bible and studying the Bible?
  • With all the resources on Bible study out there, why do we need new resources on Bible study?
  • How can we encourage other people to study the Bible?
  • How much of your time is spent studying the Bible?
  • What role does historical criticism play in the way you study the Bible?
  • How do you decipher a difficult passage?
  • How do you prepare your sermons, or conduct research for your books? What tools do you use?
  • What are some of the methods you have found that make Bible study appealing to a larger community?
  • If you could study alongside any biblical author or character, besides Jesus, who would you choose?

Whether you’re a pastor, teacher, student or disciple of the Word, there’s a lot to glean from Dr. MacArthur’s years of experience. His responses to the questions above will inspire, challenge, and help you fine-tune your own time in the Word.

If you are already a subscriber to Bible Study Magazine you should receive the MacArthur issue the first week or so of November. If you were one of the original subscribers, you need to make sure you have renewed your subscription so you will continue receiving the magazine.

If you have not yet subscribed to Bible Study Magazine, you are really missing out. Subscribe now and you can start off with the fantastic November–December issue with John MacArthur’s interview on Bible study, as well as J.I. Packer’s interview on “A Balanced Bible Study Diet”, incredible articles and special sections like “Remembering to Remember the Goodness of God”, “Away in a Manger, but Not in a Barn: An Archaeologist Examines the Nativity Scene”, “The Prophets—A Start to Finish Bible Study Guide”, “Composing the Bible—Transmission, Translation & Context”, and so much more.

P.S. Don’t forget to check out the 100+ MacArthur titles available for Logos Bible Software!

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A Typical Ship Day

On the blog we try to take opportunities to show you what it is like to work at Logos. We’ve shown you our cook-offs. We’ve introduced you to some of our employees. We’ve even shown you our Bible study bus.

Well, Friday we shipped the New International Commentary and thought that this would be a perfect time to show you what it is like around the office when we ship a new product.