Pillar New Testament Commentary: The First Letter to the Corinthians

Goodwin

I am a huge fan of the Apostle Paul. Not only does his life fascinate me, but I always find myself inspired by his teachings to the early Church. Love one another. Don’t be divisive. Be careful how you live. I can relate to so many of the struggles Christians went through nearly 2,000 years ago, and I’m grateful for Paul’s words that continually point me towards Christ, even in today’s very different times.

That’s why I’m excited about our newest Pillar New Testament Commentary offering. Pillar New Testament Commentary: The First Letter to the Corinthians has been on Pre-Pub for a while now and it’s getting ready to ship!
Noted theologians Brian S. Rosner and Roy E. Ciampa thoroughly unpack this New Testament epistle, basing their exposition on the Greek New Testament. They are deeply committed to a fresh wrestling with the text, using every means at their disposal to “loosen the Bible from its pages” to help readers understand what the text says and how to apply it to life today. Yet, the scholarship does not undermine the accessibility of this volume.

D. A. Carson—professor, theologian, and author/editor of more than 45 resources—wrote the preface to this commentary. In it, he says:

“Those with the responsibility to preach and teach 1 Corinthians will be grateful for this commentary for a long time, while more advanced students of the New Testament will learn some new things and be challenged to think through this epistle with fresh eyes. It is a pleasure to commend this work.”

There’s no doubt about it: the first book of Corinthians is rich with theology and early Church history, and the Pillar New Testament Commentary: The First Letter to the Corinthians does a great job of illuminating the text. Here’s the good news: if you act now, you can still take advantage of our Pre-Pub pricing. It’s not too late to pick this up before it ships.

While you’re at it, if you haven’t already, check out the other Pillar New Testament commentaries available from Logos.

Today’s guest post is by Bethany Olsen, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.

Logos 4: Display Your English Bibles

mp|seminars TipsToday’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

I received an e-mail recently from a Logos user asking how to see all of the English Bibles he owns. Here’s what I told him:

  • Press Ctrl +L (PC) or Cmd + L (Mac) to open the Library in a floating window
  • Enter this text in the Library’s Find or search box: type:Bible AND lang:English

That rule tells Logos to display all of the resources containing the word Bible in the type field and at the same time English in the language field. Hence, Logos displays your English Bibles!

The Works of Thomas Goodwin on Pre-Pub

Goodwin

Thomas Goodwin’s influence in the 17th century was larger than his immediate name recognition might suggest. His works provide the same kind of practical advice—both profound and readable—that you would expect to find with his more recognized contemporary Richard Baxter.

Goodwin’s Education

Goodwin entered Christ’s College, Cambridge in 1613—at the age of twelve—and received his B.A. in 1616. In 1619 he was transferred to Catherine Hall and, while working on his M.A. degree, was made a lecturer in the Hall. After the death of John Preston in 1628, he became a lecturer at Trinity Church sharing his influence with both Cambridge scholars and the surrounding town. Within four years Goodwin was presented to the vicarage by King Charles I.

The Church of England attempts to purge Puritanism

William Laud, the Bishop of London and close adviser to Charles I, was made Archbishop of Canterbury in 1633. Laud was greatly worried that the growing Puritan movement was a schismatic threat to orthodoxy in the Church of England. He quickly began enforcing laws against ministers who strayed from Book of Common Prayer. He also introduced new church ceremonies and forced ministers to conduct them or face exile, loss of goods, loss of livelihood, and even death. (For great insight into this period check out The History of the Puritans (5 vols.))

Goodwin resigned his position at Trinity Church and left Cambridge in 1634, aligning himself with the Congregationalists. He married in 1638 and was then was forced to flee persecution in Holland.

Goodwin’s return to England

With the inception of the Long Parliament by Charles I, all exiles due to nonconformity were invited to return to their homes. Goodwin returned home to London and ministered for many years at Paved Alley Church, Lime Street, in the parish of St Dunstans-in-the-East.

His distinction and influence continued to rise drawing the attention Oliver Cromwell, to whom he became chaplain, in 1656. As Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Cromwell was responsible for Presbyterianism in Scotland and preserving Protestantism in England. Goodwin remained one of Cromwell’s intimate advisers—even attending to Cromwell at his deathbed.

In 1653 Goodwin, with John Owen, composed an amended Westminster Confession.

Goodwin’s final years

For the last twenty years of his life Goodwin devoted himself to theological study while pastoring the Fetter Lane Independent Church. In a memoir to his son before his death Goodwin said,

“I am going to the three Persons with whom I have had communion: They have taken me, I did not take Them. I shall be changed in the twinkling of an eye; all my lusts and corruptions I shall be rid of, which I could not be here; those croaking toads will fall off in a moment.”

Goodwin’s works available on Pre-Pub

The Works of Thomas Goodwin (12 vols.) is currently featured on Pre-Pub from Logos Bible Software. You can pick up this collection of writings from this great man of depth and conviction—a hearty 6,228 pages—for 70% off the retail price! These kinds of collections not only provide edifying instruction, they offer insight and context into a tumultuous and important time for Christian freedom and expression.

For more great Puritan resources be sure to see:

And don’t miss out on Puritan Sermons 1659–1689 (6 vols.), currently available on Community Pricing.

The Essential Bible App

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AppShouter.com called it “by far one of the best free Bible apps to hit the App Store.” A writer for the Unofficial Apple Weblog lamented that he didn’t have it when he read through the Bible in a year.

And just last week AppAdvice.com selected it as the “Essential Bible App.”

So what makes the Logos iPhone and iPad app so great?

Free

The Logos bible app is free. It gives you access to 40+ different resources from Biblia.com (another free service from Logos), including 30 Bibles such as the HCSB, NKJV, ESV, NLT, NASB, and KJV.

You also get an additional 30+ free resources by simply creating a Logos.com account and signing in from the app.

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Seesmic Desktop Features a Ref.ly Plugin

Ref.lySeesmic Desktop is an all-in-one tool which lets you to update a number of Twitter accounts as well as your Facebook profile at the same time. Many online reviews of Seesmic call it, “Absolutely the best desktop utility.”

Now this dynamic social media manager is offering Ref.ly as a plugin to help you share Scripture more effectively with your followers and friends!

With Ref.ly Bible Verse Links, you can instantly link your Bible verses with short URLs to the full text of the passage at Biblia.com. Seesmic even chose to feature this great new plugin on their blog!

Using this plugin is simple. Type your tweet with the biblical reference, click one button, and Ref.ly Bible Verse Links will detect and change your Bible reference into a short URL that links to the full passage at Biblia.com.

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The 2011 Winter Soup Cook-Off

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January 20th proved to be a perfect day for Logos’ annual soup cook-off. In true Pacific Northwest fashion it was a cold and rainy day. The weather did not hamper this year’s cook-off though as entrants were excited to participate in not only the first cook-off of 2011, but also the first cook-off held in the recently acquired Flatiron building.

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While the 10 entrants prepared their dishes, the aroma of a variety of awesome soups lured hungry employees to line up in anticipation. Ultimately the happy eaters had to vote for their favorites, and it was a close call this year.

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After all was said and done, the winners of this year’s cook-off were Don and Tara Everett’s “Spicy Chicken Sausage Soup.” Second place was awarded to Sarah Knepper with her “Pnw’ed Salmon Chowder,” and coming in third was Tom Fay with “The Original Ham and Bean Soup.”

Here is the recipe for the Everett’s award winning soup:

Spicy Chicken Sausage Soup

Ingredients:

1 onion, chopped
1 pound of pork sausage
1 pound chorizo
2 average sized chicken breasts
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound ground pork sausage
6 cloves garlic, diced
2 bay leaves
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped
2 cup chicken broth
2 cans white beans, drained
thyme and sage to taste

  • In a large pot, add olive oil and brown pork sausage.
  • Break up and add chorizo
  • Chop up and add uncooked chicken breasts
  • Add garlic and bay leaves
  • Add onion
  • Add carrots and celery
  • Add chicken broth (you can add more broth to taste)
  • Add white beans
  • Add thyme and sage to taste and let simmer until it’s as thick as you want it
  • Remove bay leaves
  • Enjoy!

Thanks again for everyone who participated and helped create another successful cook-off and congratulations to all the winners!

Today’s guest post is by Deborah Mickens, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.

Logos 4: Shortcuts for the Reference Box

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Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As you’re working in a versified book (primarily Bibles and commentaries) you’ll find yourself constantly typing Bible verses in its reference box. For example, if you’re in a Bible you can type Ps 23 in the reference box, press the Enter key and jump to that location. Here are a couple of little tricks to help out in that reference box:

  • You can press Ctrl + G (PC) or Cmd + G (Mac) to select all of the text in the reference box. This saves you from having to constantly move the cursor into the box and manually select text.
  • Make sure to use abbreviations: Jn 3:16 or jn3.16 or jn3 16 all will take you to John 3:16.
  • Use a ‘super short’ reference to navigate within the same section of a Bible or commentary. For example, if the reference box contains John 10.2, press Ctrl + G or Cmd + G to select the text, just type 10, and press the Enter key to jump to John 10:10! Type 17.1 to jump to John 17:1.

The Trusted Scholarship of Tabletalk: Now on Pre-Pub

TableTalk

What do R. C. Sproul, D. A. Carson, Jay Adams, Alistair Begg, Michael S. Horton, John Piper, and John MacArthur have in common?

They’re contributors to one of the world’s top Christian magazines: Tabletalk, which is now on Pre-Pub. Each month, Tabletalk’s contributor list is a veritable who’s who of trusted Christian scholarship. For thirty years Ligonier’s Tabletalk has consistently published award winning issues with Christianity’s most trusted thinkers—and now Logos users can have every issue produced between 1989–2010. That’s 265 issues!

Here’s a quick sample of some recent articles by some of today’s high-profile leaders:

  • “Rejoice with Trembling” by John Piper
  • “Knowing Scripture” by R. C. Sproul
  • “Time to (Re)Discover Hebrews” by Sinclair Ferguson
  • “Bearing One Another’s Burdens” by John MacArthur
  • “Expectant Christians” by Iain Campbell
  • “Faith” and “Faithfulness” by D. A. Carson
  • “Stand Firm” by Jay Adams
  • “Justification and Ecumenism” by Michael Horton
  • and many, many more!

And with Logos, you can search every issue by topic, Scripture reference, or by author.

Is Tabletalk a wonderful resource? Absolutely! But don’t just take our word for it, check out these endorsements from actual contributors:

Tabletalk has been a key ingredient in the diet of Christians conscious of their spiritual vitality.—Michael S. Horton

Month by month, Tabletalk represents an oasis in a desert of false spirituality, mindless Christianity, and vapid conviction. Tabletalk represents theological rigor, biblical Christianity, and authentic Christian devotion. It is an antidote to the world of superficial Christianity. Read it and grow.R. Albert Mohler, Jr.

Tabletalk has been a wonderful resource in my own daily walk with the Lord.—Ravi Zacharias

Make sure you get your 265 complete issues of Tabletalk—while it is still on Pre-Pub!

New Interpreter’s Bible and New Interpreter’s Dictionary Now on Pre-Pub!

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A couple of long-awaited additions—that users have been requesting for years—have recently been included on our Pre-Pub page: The New Interpreter’s Bible (12 vols.) and the New Interpreter’s Dictionary (5 vols.). In the two short weeks since these two collections have hit our Pre-Publication list, they have each gathered nearly half of the interest needed to send them into production. I’m pleased to see such a warm welcome for some of today’s most comprehensive resources for biblical study!

In case these titles are new to you, let me tell you a bit more about each—they are definitely worth a second look:

Deemed “the standard in contemporary biblical studies,” The New Interpreter’s Bible (12 vols.) is composed of a staggering 11,591 pages, penned by top biblical scholars. Not only is this commentary set impressive in girth, its sheer number of illustrations, maps, charts, timelines, and other visual aids add depth of content. Contributors include:

  • Walter Brueggemann
  • Walter C. Kaiser
  • Leander Keck
  • And many others

And, have you ever come across an unknown topic, person, or place in the Bible and wondered “How do I even begin to research this?” The New Interpreter’s Dictionary (5 vols.) provides a fantastic place to gain meticulously researched knowledge on a wide variety of subjects. Let the 900 contributing scholars do the work for you as you seek a better understanding of the Word! Edited by Katharine Doob Sakenfeld, this compendium clarifies biblical terms from A to Z.

Ultimately—whether you are a pastor, Bible study leader, or layperson—you’ll find these two collections to be catalysts for deeper Bible study. As 2011 continues to unfold, let the New Interpreter’s volumes illuminate the Scriptures for you.

If you are one of the many people who have asked for these books in Logos format, now is your chance to pre-order! If you are just in the market for two major reference sets—which are fully-tagged, fully-linked Logos resources—look no further. The The New Interpreter’s Bible (12 vols.) and the New Interpreter’s Dictionary (5 vols.) are premier resources that would be an asset to any resource collection.

Today’s guest post is by Bethany Olsen, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.

The Schedule for BibleTech:2011 Is Live!

BibleTech:2011

BibleTech:2011 is shaping up to be an incredible event for anyone passionate about the latest developments in Bible and technology! If you don’t believe me, check out the newly posted schedule for yourself!

Curious about the hows and whys of the The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition? Do you want to know how ProjectEbenezer.com is using the internet to connect the Church to theologians? Have you wondered what the Scriptures teach about technology and its appropriate use? Maybe you’re more interested in mobile Bible study or what’s in store for the next generation of mobile technologies.

Wherever your interests lie, be sure to secure your seat at BibleTech:2011, where you’ll learn from the experts! Registration is only $159.95 and gets you access to twenty-eight presentations, three catered meals, a conference T-shirt, and the chance get to know fellow Bible and technology geeks!

BibleTech:2011 will consist of fourteen sessions split between March 25 and 26. Each session will give you the option of a high-tech presentation or a low-tech presentation. The high-tech presentations will discuss the latest developments in Bible software platforms and the use of computer-based technologies for Bible translation and Bible study. The low-tech presentations will handle issues of design sensitivity, current trends in Bible technologies, and the integration of the Bible with internet-based communities.

A list of conference speakers is available on the conference website. Get acquainted with the speakers and catch up on their preparations for BibleTech:2011 by checking out their personal links. You can also view the official BibleTech:2011 schedule and plan ahead for your BibleTech experience.

Register today! BibleTech:2011 and experience a fresh look into the exciting ways that technology is affecting the way we study, visualize, and communicate the Scriptures.