Dean Deppe Talks Exegesis with Logos Talk: Part II

Yesterday we featured part one of a two-part discussion with Dean Deppe, Professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary. In part one, Deppe discussed the exegetical methods he promotes in his book All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible. Today, in part two of our interview, Deppe shares how Logos Bible Software factors into his process for biblical interpretation.

Logos: What about All Roads Lead to the Text would be of particular interest to Logos users?

Deppe: At Calvin Seminary we require the use of Logos Bible Software for every student, and we have an entire course in the curriculum which teaches students how to use the software. We believe the tools Logos supplies motivate pastors and preachers to continue to do a thorough job of exegesis—including the use of the original languages of Hebrew and Greek. In addition, I know that Logos is interested in how the software is employed in the classroom, so throughout the book I demonstrate how to use the software in exegesis. Since Bible software is becoming more important for research and analysis, many of the exegetical examples demonstrate how to employ Logos Bible Software to attain quick and accurate results.

Logos: Wow, that’s great! How do you use Logos Bible Software for exegesis?

Deppe: I talk about three main ways I use Logos for exegesis:

  1. I introduce tools developed by Logos which make exegesis easier, quicker, and more fun. For instance, when I discuss the importance of establishing the contours of a pericope, I demonstrate from the “Compare Pericopes” tool. In the chapter on structure I use the Lexham Clausal Outlines of the Greek NT and the Lexham Syntactic Greek NT  [both available in Scholar’s Library and higher]. In the chapter on grammar I demonstrate the value of visual filters. When I discuss translations, I teach the reader how to construct a layout of all the major Bible translations that you can easily return to on a regular basis.
  2. I recommend works from Logos which you can add to the base packages for greater research ability. In the chapter on historical background, I suggest a collection of Bible dictionaries and demonstrate how to set up a collection of resources to search for information.
  3. I perform specific basic, Bible, and morphological searches using the software to demonstrate the exegetical process.

Logos: Can you give us an example how Logos Bible Software is used on a specific text?

Deppe: Sure! For instance, the colorful nuances of the Greek noun καταρτισμὸν for “equipping” the saints in Ephesians 4:12 are difficult to determine, since this word occurs only here in the Greek Bible.

But other searches in Logos Bible Software can uncover similar roots. If one attempts a morphological search in the NIV or ESV by choosing Logos Greek Morphology and typing in g:katarti (g for Greek and katarti as the root of words connected to “equip”), several interesting references to the Greek verb καταρτίζω are revealed.

Such passages include Matthew 4:21; 1 Corinthians 1:10; and Luke 6:40 which throw light on the meaning of “equip.”

  • In Jesus’ calling of James and John to discipleship in Matthew 4:21, this Greek word contains the imagery of repairing nets implying that “equipping the saints” means repairing people’s lives.
  • 1 Corinthians 1:10 employs the additional imagery of reconciling two conflicting parties.
  • Finally, Luke 6:40 describes modeling behavior so that the training of the saints implies a process whereby the student resembles the teacher.

Therefore to equip the saints encompasses:

  • repairing people’s lives,
  • training them in conflict management, and
  • modeling Christ-like behavior.

A search in Logos supplies some interesting pictures!

Or another example where you search your various Bible dictionaries quickly without taking them down from the shelf and attempting to find the correct page. Automatically, while studying Mark 6:11 about shaking off the dust of your feet, Logos Bible Software will bring up all references in your collection of Bible dictionaries.

Here’s what I mean:

  • Harper’s Bible Dictionary calls attention to the importance of hospitality in Jewish culture.
  • The Dictionary of Biblical Imagery goes further and demonstrates that this action also signifies divine judgment. Human disdain of God’s servants has aroused God’s righteous anger.
  • But continuing to search you discover The Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament which describes shaking the dust off your feet as a gesture that is practiced after leaving Gentile territory. Normally, Jews shake off the dust when they exit pagan territory; however, now the disciples are treating their fellow Jews as pagans when they do not accept the gospel message of Jesus. Jesus is creating a new family and nation that is bound together by faith and not blood.

As you can see, a quick search like this supplies a plethora of meaning to this Jewish gesture.

Logos: How do you envision your book being used?

Deppe: This book is aimed at seminary students, pastors and preachers, and educated lay people who desire to read the Bible In addition, it can be used for small group study and additional research through the discussion questions at the end of each chapter.

Logos: How do you think All Roads Lead to the Text will appeal to other biblical professors?

Deppe: For one thing, it offers a great teaching method for students and can be employed as a textbook. But the appendixes contain some vital material not found together anywhere else. I include a morphology of genre which describes the various sub-genre in Scripture and add a succinct list the principles of interpretation for the main scriptural genres. Specifically, I describe in detail all the controversy dialogues in the Gospel of Mark and then offer an analysis of how literary devices are employed for organizational purposes in the Bible. This material should be stimulating to the academy.

Logos:  What tools from Logos Bible Software do you think are the most helpful for the average pastor or teacher?

Deppe: I use lots of tools. These are some of the tools I find most helpful:
  • I employ the layouts every day. Instantly I can set up a study a NT grid with the Greek text and all the major Bible versions in my purview. I have layouts for the Apostolic Fathers in Greek and English, Philo’s writings, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus’ writings, and the Pseudepigrapha.
  • While I am studying a particular text, I can call up a commentary, and it automatically proceeds to the passage I am examining. What a time-saver!
  • Since we live in a visual age, I love the visual filters which let me color code the tenses of the verbs, for instance.
  • With Logos I also have my own concordance and can easily search various texts.
  • Word studies have always been important in preparing Bible studies and sermons.
  • I also frequently use the Bible Word Study and Exegetical Guide. Both are easy to work with and comprehensive in Logos.

I have pastors email me every month and thanks us for the training we have given them in Logos Bible Software at Calvin Theological Seminary.

We want to thank Dean Deppe for taking time to talk to us! Make sure to check out All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible while it is on Pre-Pub!

Tell us how Logos Bible Software helps you do exegesis.

Dean Deppe Talks Exegesis with Logos Talk: Part I

The Bible can be a difficult book to interpret. Churches split over the interpretation of controversial texts, and many Bible readers feel bewildered about tough passages of Scripture.

To help clarify and outline various methods of exegesis and interpretation, Dean Deppe, Professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary, has written All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible, currently on Pre-Pub.

In a way, this is a book designed for Logos users. Deppe an avid Logos user himself (he used Logos Bible Software as he wrote the book), and All Roads contains numerous examples of how to use Logos for exegesis and interpretation. So not only is this book vitally important for general readers, but it is especially beneficial for Logos users who are serious about understanding the text.

We were excited when Dr. Deppe took time out of his busy schedule to talk to us about All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible. What follows is the first half of a 2-part discussion.

Logos: Why did you write All Roads Lead to the Text?

Deppe: Interpreting the Bible can be frustratingly difficult for the average person. The eight chapters in this book equip the average reader with the methods scholars employ to interpret this historic book. The goal is that the reader will conclude at the end, “I too can read the Bible.”

Logos: How do you equip the reader to interpret the Bible?

Deppe: The book All Roads Lead to the Text functions as a template for model exegesis through an examination of:

  • grammar,
  • literary devices,
  • structure,
  • context,
  • historical and cultural background,
  • the history of interpretation, and
  • the exegete’s presuppositions for interpretation.

So really it is a book about exegetical methodology or hermeneutics.

What sets this volume apart from all others is the continuous use of biblical examples rather than an explanation of exegetical methods. Furthermore, I employ Logos Bible Software as I explore these biblical examples, so that students can perform their research more quickly and do not have to be close to a theological library.

All Roads Lead to the Text

Logos: You describe the book as a template for exegesis. How do you teach the process of exegesis?

Deppe: The best teaching methods employ memorable pictures. This volume compares the exegetical process to the use of various types of camera lenses so the reader perceives in a new way the importance of grammar, context, literary genre, historical background, structural analysis, and the history of interpretation.

Logos: Describe for us the flow of the book and the exegetical methods you employ.

Deppe: To fully understand the biblical text, we must place more than one lens on our exegetical camera.

The literary analysis of chapter one involves the employment of an infra-red lens to investigate what cannot always be seen in natural light. I demonstrate how the identification of unspecified genre and literary devices affect the final interpretation of a passage.

For grammatical exegesis in chapter two we employ an exegetical microscope which scrutinizes the details of a passage from words, to phrases, to clauses until we arrive at various translations of the text.

In chapter three we take a skeleton snapshot of the text so that we can envision the structure of the passage through developing a clausal outline.

Then, in chapter four, we avail ourselves of a wide-angled lens to probe the context before and after a particular pericope in chapter four.

In chapter five we utilize a telescopic lens and explore the world behind the text by inspecting the cultural and historical background.

Then, in chapter six, we roll out the motion picture exegetical camera in chapter seven to study the various periods of church history and to investigate how an examination of the major commentaries benefits our exegesis.

Next to last, chapter seven develops the finished photo through a theological analysis of the text and an exploration of the canonical meaning.

Finally, in chapter eight, we do not want to forget to explore the world in front of the text by an investigation of the reader’s presuppositions. We need to take an x-ray picture of ourselves so that we don’t subconsciously deceive ourselves and read our unexamined presuppositions into the text. Here I describe seven spiritual exercises and disciplines that enable us to apply the text to contemporary life.

These exegetical camera shots form a sample album of proofs that offer snapshots of the text from various angles. We discover that all roads lead to the text as the title of the book says.

Logos: What makes this book different from other books that interpret the Bible?

Deppe: What sets this volume apart from all others is the continuous use of biblical examples rather than an explanation of exegetical methods. Students and preachers want immediate application of theoretical methods. They want to know how a study of the grammar or structure of the text will make a difference. So in each chapter I include ten to twenty concrete examples of how the context or history of interpretation makes a difference in how you understand the Bible. Each description of a text consists of a couple of pages so the information is easily accessible yet sufficient in length to stimulate a good discussion.

Logos: Rarely does a volume include both scholarly exegesis along with a section on spiritual disciplines that will affect the reader in interpreting the text. What made you want to tackle these two together?

Deppe: The addition of a chapter on “Spiritual Exegesis” attempts to propose seven strategies in addition to the historical-critical method that affect interpretation and application. These spiritual disciplines include

  1. a practicing faith perspective,
  2. personalizing the text,
  3. praying Scripture,
  4. picturing concepts through meditation,
  5. listening prophetically,
  6. paradigm-building through mirroring, and
  7. imaginative application.

This x-ray of our personality, presuppositions, and spiritual makeup certifies that this whole process is not just an intellectual exercise completely separated from our life experience. Historical-critical exegesis stands at a crossroads where it must recognize and incorporate other methods into its field of vision. Our methods of interpretation must not only supply information but also personally form the reader, supply practical application, and connect the reader directly to God in deeper and more meaningful ways. That’s what I try to do in the last chapter.

Come back tomorrow for Part II of our discussion with Dean Deppe! And make sure to check out All Roads Lead to the Text: Eight Methods of Inquiry into the Bible for an opportunity to get it while it is still available at a great Pre-Pub discount.

Do you have favorite exegetical tips? Share them with us!

Thinking Green: Environmental Stewardship and the Psalms

Is it possible to be “Green” and be Christian? How should we interpret and put into practice Genesis 1:26? God created our planet, what is our responsiblity in maintaining it? Are there places in the Bible that speak about environmental stewardship? These are questions many Christians are asking themselves. And Arthur Walker-Jones, Associate Professor of Theology at the University of Winnipeg, believes the answers can be found in one of the most popular books of the Old Testament: the Psalms.

The Green Psalter: Resources for an Ecological Spirituality mines the Psalms with these very questions in mind. Walker-Jones explores the “Green” phenomenon in popular culture and current events—such as the movie An Inconvenient Truth and Hurricane Katrina—through a biblical lens, and discusses what role Christians might play in this global movement.  Walker-Jones makes his points with engaging prose and fresh and original insight on the Psalms. As one reviewer suggests, “he makes a convincing case the psalter is ‘greener’ than one might think” (Carol A. Newsom, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Old Testament, Emory University).

The Green Psalter is just one volume out of the eleven included in the Fortress Press Hebrew Bible Collection. Bringing together some of the top scholars on the Hebrew Bible, such as Walter Brueggemann and Marvin A. Sweeney, this collection will provide a solid foundation for study of the Hebrew Bible. And right now, you can pick it up for only $199.95 in Pre-Pub, a savings of almost 40%.

Logos 4: Hierarchical Table of Contents

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsWith the recent release of Logos 4.3 comes the Personal Books (PB)  tool, allowing you to transform your Word .docx files into Logos resources. You can now create as many books as you want from your sermon manuscripts, Bible study lessons, school papers, quiet time journals, recipes, or whatever text you want to view inside of Logos.

Our team at mpseminars has created numerous QuickClip training videos to help you get started building books. I also want to provide written instructions for you in several Monday blogs. Hopefully between the videos and blogs you’ll be well on your way in centralizing digital text in your Logos library.

A previous blog gave you the overview of building books so I’ll concentrate on helping you create .docx files that lead to great PB. Today I’ll show you how to create a hierarchical table of contents in your books.

Microsoft Word allows you to format text with nine headings or levels. Logos recognizes these headings and uses them to create a hierarchical table of contents when building PB. After compiling your PB, the table of  contents will look like this:

Heading 1

Heading 2

Heading 3

Heading 4


In case you’re not familiar with headings in Word, here’s all you do:

  • Select text in the .docx file that you want to make a major division in the table of contents
  • Choose the Home menu in Word
  • Click the Heading 1 button on Word’s toolbar
  • Select text in the .docx file that you want to make a section under the major division in the table of contents
  • Choose the Home menu in Word
  • Click the Heading 2 button on Word’s toolbar
  • Repeat these steps for as much text as you want in the .docx file

For example, let’s say you have a sermon manuscript or Bible study lesson that will become a PB.

The title of the manuscript or lesson would be Heading 1.

Each major point in the sermon or lesson would be Heading 2.

Each sub-point in the sermon or question in the lesson would be Heading 3.

You get the idea. After building your PB, click its panel menu and display your new hierarchical table of contents!


Now that the Personal Books tool has been live for a couple of weeks, how many Personal Books have you added to your library? Leave a comment letting us know the number of books you’ve added, and the book type (sermons, devotionals, prayer journals, etc.).

Weekly Roundup: August 20

The Weekly Roundup is a regular feature alerting you to significant things happening at Logos this week. Take a few moments to check out these newsworthy items for the week of August 20, 2011.

Logos Talk

Interesting Discussions

Logos Forum

Logos Facebook Page


Key Item

You do not want to miss out on the free Perseus Collections!

New Pre-Pubs

Last Chance Pre-Pubs

These are Pre-Pubs shipping next week. Don’t miss your last chance to get these at their amazing Pre-Pub prices!


Carol Kent is very excited about her book, A New Kind of Normal coming soon to the Vyrso bookstore! We are looking forward to many great books from authors like Carol Kent, Sheila Walsh, and Jan Silvious.

Job Postings

Logos is hiring! Here are just a few of the newer posting on our Careers page:

IT Department

Marketing Department

Was there anything else from Logos you found interesting this week? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Get WBC, Preacher’s Commentary, and More—On Sale for 7 More Days!

Word Biblical Commentary Series . . . and More!

The 59-volume Word Biblical Commentary is one of the leading commentaries on the Bible. It’s one of the most-recommended, most-read, and most-used commentary sets written in a generation. It contains volumes by Gordon J. Wenham, David J. A. Clines, Peter C. Craigie, John E. Goldingay, Donald A. Hagner, John Nolland, James D. G. Dunn, and dozens of others. No wonder it’s one of our bestselling commentaries.

Lots of Logos users have already added WBC to their library.

If you’re one of the users who hasn’t, then here’s a reason to think about getting it: The entire Word Biblical Commentary series on sale for just $3 per volume as part of the Nelson Bible Reference Bundle.

What’s more, WBC is just one series on a long list of top-notch commentaries, reference books, sermon helps, Bible study aids, and other resources in this collection.

But you need to act now, because this sale price lasts for only 7 more days.

What Is the Nelson Bible Reference Bundle?

With the Nelson Bible Reference Bundle, we’ve packed 200 volumes of top commentaries, reference books, Bible studies, and more into a comprehensive collection. Here’s a quick snapshot of what’s included:

  • 59 volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary Series (worth around $3,000.00!)
  • 35 volumes of The Preacher’s Commentary Series (worth $700.00!)
  • 12 volumes of A Treasury of Great Preaching (worth $300.00!)
  • 8 volumes of Nelson’s Annual Preacher’s Sourcebook (worth $240.00!)
  • 86 additional books and commentaries (worth $1,760.00)

The Word Biblical Commentary—and Lots More!

If you were to buy only the Word Biblical Commentary all by itself, you would pay $699.95. With this collection, you get not only the Word Biblical Commentary, but you also get the 35-volume Preacher’s Commentary Series, plus the 12-volume Treasury of Great Preaching, plus the Nelson Annual Preacher’s Sourcebook, and on top of that almost one hundred additional books—all for $599.95. That’s 200 books—including the WBC—for $100 less than what you would pay for just the WBC by itself.

As you can see, if you’ve been thinking of getting the WBC, it makes more sense to get the 200-volume Nelson Bible Reference Bundle instead. Not only will you get the WBC, but you’ll get tons of other books, all for less than what you would pay for the WBC if you had gotten the WBC by itself.

You won’t see the discount on the product page, though. The only way to get the special price is to enter coupon code 7DAYS at checkout.

The Clock is Ticking

It’s hard to overstate just how good of a deal this really is: $6,000.00 worth of books for only $599.95. That’s 200 books at under $3 a book. No matter how you put it, it’s a phenomenal deal.

The main thing to remember is that this sale is over in 7 days. Don’t miss out on your chance to add 200 books to your library at just $3 per book! And if you’d like to spread out your payment over the next few months, select a payment plan at checkout. If you’re a pastor, this is the perfect way to use your monthly book budget to get WBC and still get in on this deal before it expires.

Remember, the only way to get this deal is to enter coupon code 7DAYS at checkout. What are you waiting for? Download it now!

Have you held off getting WBC? Is this the dealbreaker? Let us know what you think!

Don’t Miss William Mitchell Ramsay on Community Pricing!

Plug the name “W. M. Ramsay” into your Logos search bar, and watch how many hits come up in your library. At the turn of the 20th century, this archeologist travelled to the holy lands to disprove the history of the Bible—and guess what? The overwhelming evidence he found in favor of the Bible led to Ramsay’s conversion.

Ramsay spent over a dozen years living in, and writing about, the Bible lands. Now, over 100 years later, as you can see in your Logos search results, his research on Near Eastern culture and the Bible is still proving to be invaluable for scholars today.

Ramsay’s fascinating exploration into the history and places described in the Acts of the Apostles deepens our understanding of early Christianity. Ramsay’s work brings to life the cities that Paul travelled through, such as Galatia, Tarsus, and Iconium. It gives context and history for the places that Luke wrote about. You’ll gain a new perspective on the cities and churches referenced in John’s Revelation.

Having all sixteen volumes of the William Mitchell Ramsay Collection linked to your library and your Bible sounds pretty cool, right? What makes this collection even more exciting is that it is in Community Pricing, and getting close to crossing the 100% mark. Right now, the most you’ll pay is about $1.88 a book. The more people that bid on this collection, there’s good chance it’s going to get even cheaper. So make sure to place your bid today and take advantage of this amazing deal.

Have you been to the Holy Lands? Leave us a comment and tell us about your most memorable experience! If you haven’t, tell us which biblical site you would love to visit.

Another Reason Logos Is the Coolest Place to Work

No doubt you’re familiar with Logos Bible Software—a cutting edge Bible study library and array of powerful tools.  But behind “Logos the product” is an equally cutting edge “Logos the company”—a bona fide incredible place to work.

Right along with the outstanding health benefits, a culture that encourages personal growth (e.g., an annual “Read for Cash” program), and various annual cook-offs (see pics), one of the coolest things about working at Logos is the Outdoor Recreation Center.

Outdoor Center

So that I could give you a better idea what the Outdoor Center really is, I recently sat down with the guy behind the idea: IT director Jim Straatman.

Stephen: First off, what exactly is the Outdoor Center?

Jim: Well, when you walk into the Outdoor Center, the first thing you see is a bike shop with professional grade tools and tuning equipment. There’s also equipment for tuning skis and snowboards, as well as an inventory of outdoor equipment for employees to checkout and use whenever they want.

Stephen: What’s the background story? How did it start?

Jim: I regularly send hardware acquisition requests for developers and IT to Bob. One time, only half seriously, I sent in a request for a bike shop. To its core, Logos is all about being the best place on the planet to work, and part of that vision includes encouraging employees to pursue outdoor hobbies. In fact, that’s the whole reason why we moved to Bellingham in the first place—for quality of life. A bike shop seemed to fit really well with that vision.

Bob looked the request and said, “Make it happen.” And things have just developed from there.

Stephen: What’s Logos ultimate goal for the outdoor center? An emphasis on certain niche sports or something more broad and comprehensive?

Jim: Some of both, really. Since it exists to supports employees’ lifestyles and interests, we want it to be whatever Logos employees make of it. Whether that means it caters to a few sports or many activities is really up to Logos employees. In fact, if people got into water polo we’d help them with that, too!

It’s similar to our free beverages (editor’s note: this includes espresso machines, sodas and juice of all types, milk, etc.), and believe it or not, the Outdoor Center costs way less than free drinks but the benefits are obviously huge!

Stephen: What kind of equipment does the Outdoor Center have?

Jim: So far there’s a racing canoe, tents, sleeping pads, snowshoes, a full bike mechanic tool set, bike tubes and valve stems, ski waxing equipment, and ground floor bike parking. But there’s a lot more in the works.

Stephen: Do people tend to use the equipment on their own, or has the outdoor center helped Logos employees build better relationships with one another outside of work?

Jim: The latter. For instance, many people have started riding together. And several employees have lost substantial amounts of weight—some as much as 40 pounds!

Aerial view

Needless to say, the Outdoor Center is a pretty sweet perk for working at Logos Bible Software. And really, it’s just one of many. In fact, the Logos Music Center is in the works as you read this.

If Logos sounds like the kind of place you’d like to work, you’re in luck! We’re hiring. Why not take a look at the positions we have available. Then hit the Tweet and Like buttons above to tell your friends. The key to even better software is more great employees, so help us spread the word!

Removing the Veil: Revealing God’s Truth for Women

Beginning with Proverbs 31, author Margaret English began studying specific Scriptures regarding women. Ten years later, her journey into the Bible’s passages pertaining to women led her to write Removing the Veil: Revealing God’s Truth for Women. In Removing the Veil, English uses exegetical work to uncover God’s way for men and women to serve as leaders in the church and in society. By exploring women’s roles in the Church, English celebrates women’s gifts and callings and then encourages them to go out and use them. Removing the Veil is divided into three sections:

  1. Unveiling Our History
  2. Unveiling Our Hearts
  3. Unveiling Our Hope

What others are saying:

A quiet revolution is taking place today as more and more women realize who Jesus destined them to be. Removing the Veil is a part of this revolution. Those who study the biblical truths outlined in this well-researched book will find true freedom from the cultural and religious mindset that have kept so many women in spiritual bondage. —J. Lee Grady, author of 10 Lies the Church Tells Women

. . . This thoughtful, passionate, and well-researched book offers tremendous insight into this critical leadership consideration. —Samuel S. Hemby, Ph. D., Southeastern University

In writing Removing the Veil, Margaret English has validated every woman active in Christian ministry and every woman called to it. Through her historical study and her exposition of biblical passages, she clearly shows that God’s design from the beginning has been for men and women to work side by side to advance His kingdom, and that God did not set limitations on what roles women could play in accomplishing this work. . . —Maureen D. Eha, Features Editor, Charisma magazine

So grab Removing the Veil while it’s on Pre-Pub for $10.95 and join English on her ten-year journey into the heart of biblical womanhood.

Do you have favorite resources on the role of women in the church? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

Logos 4: Right Click Thematic Study

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsAs an expository preacher, I primarily preach-teach through paragraphs in the Bible. I explain the context, word meanings, and the author’s original intent and of course suggest modern application. Within many biblical paragraphs, however, are topics or themes discussed elsewhere in Scripture. Understanding the entire Scriptural concept certainly sheds light on the individual piece of the puzzle contained within a specific passage of the Bible. For example, redemption is a biblical theme discussed in Ephesians 1:7, but that’s just one verse out of many commenting on the subject. Seeing the whole picture leads to better comprehension of the individual pieces.

Zondervan Dictionary of Bible Themes, contained in most Logos collections, assists us in grasping the big picture of a biblical topic. Here are some suggestions for using the resource:

First, make sure it’s in the top five of prioritized, topical books (Bible dictionaries, English dictionaries, topical Bibles, etc.)

  • Open the Library
  • Click Prioritize (1)
  • Type title:Zondervan in the Library’s Find box (2)
  • Drag Zondervan Dictionary of Bible Themes to the Prefer these resources list on the right (remember to place it in the top five of prioritized, topical books) (3)
  • Close the Library

Logos 4: Right Click Thematic Study (1)

After prioritizing the book, use your right click menu to open it:

  • Open an English Bible to a passage such as Hebrews 4:9, which mentions the biblical theme of rest (4)
  • Right click on the word rest (5)
  • From the right menu click Selection rest and then the title of the resource Zondervan Dictionary of Bible Themes (6)(7)

Logos 4: Right Click Thematic Study (2)

The book opens to a brief comment about the theme (5056). Underneath the comment notice:

  • 5057 rest, physical
  • 5058 rest, spiritual
  • 5059 rest, eternal

Within each section you’ll see hyperlink cross references as well as See also directing you to related themes.

Logos 4: Right Click Thematic Study (3)

After looking up many of these cross references, you’ll begin to understand the theme of rest!

I also encourage you to read the Introduction and How to use this book sections of this resource. Here the editors explain the organization of the book. This will be quite helpful if you’ve never used this book.

What are your favorite themes in the Bible? Is it grace, forgiveness, mercy, love, redemption, etc.? Leave a comment letting us and other Logos users know!