Seven Great Eschatological Resources

eschatology
Today’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

“This is the end—for me the beginning of life.”

German pastor-theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer spoke these famous last words to his fellow prisons at the Flossenbürg concentration camp where he was imprisoned as a conspirator against the Nazi regime.

For Bonhoeffer, and many of us, the end of our earthly life is the beginning of an even greater journey: eternal life with God. But for most of us, figuring out what this means exactly is a bit trickier. To further complicate matters, Christian eschatology (the systematic study of the Last Things) is often full of rabbit trails, speculation, and esoteric biblical imagery. Finally, there are so many different biblically supported positions concerning Eschatology; it’s difficult to know where to even begin.

Hopefully this list will be a nice primer on resources that might aid you in your Biblical studies of eschatology.

  • George Ladd—The Last Things: An Eschatology for Layman

    The late Fuller Theological Seminary professor is best known for articulating the “now/not yet” nature of the Kingdom of God. God’s kingdom has been fulfilled within history in Jesus Christ but awaits its consummation at the end of history. In this volume, Ladd guides us through the Biblical witness concerning the End Times.

  • Loraine Boettner—The Millennium

    In this volume, Reformed thinker Loraine Boettner examines the relative merits, weaknesses, and Biblical support for the three three major positions concerning the Second Coming of Christ and the future of God’s Kingdom: amillenialism, premillenialism, and Boettner’s preferred position: postmillennialism.

  • Thomas Oden—Systematic Theology (3 vol.)

    Life in the Spirit, the third volume of Methodist theologian Oden’s towering systematic draws from the deep cistern classical Christianity in examining the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Church universal and the individual believer. Concluding with a discussion on eschatology, the Last Things are far from a theological addendum but instead includes both “the end and meaning of the whole of human history” (p. 371).

  • Thomas Aquinas—Summa Theologica

  • Thomas Aquinas—Catena Auraea: Commentary on the Four Gospels

    Eschatology as a discipline didn’t begin yesterday. We have much to learn from the past. Summa Theologica is an outstanding source for any topic, but is especially important for providing much of the basis for Roman Catholic thought over the last 700 years. As a compilation of Patristic commentary on the Gospels, Catena Auraea is unique in that it affords you to get a sneak peak on how the Church has historically interpreted the Gospel passages concerning the End Times.

  • Dictionary of Biblical Prophecy and End Times

    As a dictionary, J. Daniel Hays, J. Scott Duvall, and C. Marvin Pate have edited a simple but thorough tool that helps you both identify the terms and issues surrounding prophecy in the Bible. As you study those often obtuse passages concerning the Last Things, this will be a resource your reach for time and time again.

  • The Future as God’s Gift: Explorations in Christian Eschatology

    Not for beginnings, but as a collection of scholarly essays concerning related topics such as the nature of time, the practice of hope, and the future of creation you’ll have food for thought on the ways eschatology might shape our Christian faith and practice in the 21st century.

It’d be a Shame to Waste All That Preparation

You spend hours each week preparing for your sermon or lessons, and you probably have more to communicate now than ever before. We’ve provided the tools you need to take your preparation to the next level, now it’s time to take your presentation to the next level too.

For nearly two decades we at Logos have digitized print books filled with biblical information. We have also developed state of the art search and retrieval technology enabling you to mine these electronic resources for those scriptural insights.

Using Logos Bible Software you can effectively exegete and study any passage in the Bible. Having thoroughly investigated the biblical text, you probably have page after page of notes, quotes, and anecdotes. If you’re a preacher, teacher, or Bible study leader you now have to organize and present that material so your listeners can understand and apply the passage.

It is great to have high-end professional-level tools like Logos Bible Software to prepare your sermon, but until now, you’ve been on your own to know how to preach it. We felt the next step was to provide you with professional-level presentation training from one of the most gifted and professional presenters we have ever met.

Toward that end, we have worked with Morris Proctor, of MPSeminars to develop “The I-Beam of Message Building” video training for our users.

As a Logos user you perhaps know Morris as the instructor at Camp Logos, the author of training manuals, and the producer of video tutorials. First and foremost, though, he is a pastor and expository preacher. Through almost 30 years of preaching and teaching God’s word, Morris has honed his communication skills. People who hear him preach are inspired by his insights into Scripture, his passionate presentation, and his down-to-earth communication style.

Because of the encouragement from others, Morris decided to organize and record his personal sermon preparation process into the I-Beam seminar. Using the analogy of a construction I-Beam, Morris shows you how to fulfill what he believes to be the two great principles of biblical preaching or teaching:

  • Be Faithful to the Text
  • Be Functional for the Times

After explaining these foundational principles, Morris then thoroughly—yet practically—walks you through six steps of preparing an expository message:

  • Interpretation
  • Incompletion
  • Impression
  • Implication
  • Intention
  • Indentation

After completing these six steps you will have a skeleton of a sermon or lesson. Morris then carefully shows you how to add flesh to the bones. He leaves no stone unturned as he teaches you, among other things, how to begin your message with an attention-getting, need-revealing introduction, powerfully state your main points, and smoothly transition from one segment of the message to the next. Wrapping it all up, he instructs you to boldly and practically end the message as you call for action from your listeners.

The I-Beam of Message Building is a video training course to watch on your TV. It works on a standard DVD player (or DVD software on your computer). It does not require Logos Bible Software. It actually picks up where Logos Bible study ends. If you teach or preach, you will immediately profit from this resource. The I-Beam program is like a video textbook on the art of preaching and teaching biblical truths.

You will learn from a master teacher as you watch these professionally produced videos and follow along in the I-Beam manual that is included with the set. Using the hyperlinked menus and the back / forward buttons, you can jump to or review any section you desire.

I-Beam picks up where Logos Bible study leaves off. It shows you how to organize your research into sermons or lessons that are both biblical in content and applicable in presentation.

If you are a preacher, teacher, or Bible study leader the I-Beam is for you. Whether you are a seasoned communicator or a beginning presenter, the I-Beam provides foundational principles and practical advice for your proclamation of God’s Word.

To watch the video demo and learn more, see The I-Beam of Message Building page.

Logos 4: Create Your Own Study Bible

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

With Logos Bible Software 4 you can in essence create your own study Bible. Think about this: a study Bible is simply the biblical text along with notes attached to verses. You can easily replicate this resource with you own notes. As you study the Bible along with commentaries, dictionaries, lexicons, and the like, you pull from each book the best it has to offer about specific verses. Why not save all of this research in a note file for future use: thereby creating your own personalized study Bible? Here’s how to do it:

  • Choose File | Notes to create an Untitled Note File
  • Name the file something like My Notes
  • Open any Bible to any verse
  • Right click on any word within that verse
  • Select from the right menu Reference ‘your verse’
  • Select Add a note to ‘your note file’ at the bottom of the menu

Logos creates a note in the file with the name of your verse. Underneath the note name is a content box. You can type or copy and paste text into this box. So as you investigate those commentaries, dictionaries, etc. copy text from them into your note file.

Notice in the Bible a yellow box next to your verse. Rest your cursor on the box to see a preview of your note. By the way, this yellow box is placed in all of your Bibles! Click the yellow box to jump to the note file.

Replicate these steps for each verse you study. After a while, as you read through the Bible, you’ll have yellow boxes next to many verses. Your own study Bible is well underway. Also, remember the note file does not need to be open to see the yellow boxes in the Bible!

Introducing the SBL Greek New Testament

Logos Bible Software has partnered with the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) to produce a new, critically edited edition of the Greek New Testament called The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition, abbreviated as SBLGNT and also known as the SBL Greek New Testament.
The SBLGNT is edited by Michael W. Holmes, already well known for his edition and translation of the Apostolic Fathers. For the SBLGNT, he utilized a wide range of printed editions of the Greek New Testament, all the major critical apparatuses, in addition to consulting the latest technical resources and manuscript discoveries as he established the text. The result is a critically edited text that differs from the NA/UBS text in more than 540 variation units.
I’ve had the privilege of being involved since the get-go on this, and it has been a load of fun.
Before the details, here are the basics:
1. It’s Free From Logos
The SBLGNT is available via SBLGNT.com. You can freely unlock the SBLGNT and its apparatus (!) for Logos Bible Software. The Logos version is fully morphologically tagged, with Louw-Nida reference annotation. The license is generous, and is fairly similar to that of the Lexham English Bible. At present, you can get plain text or XML files for your own personal use.Note for Mac Users: There is an issue with Logos 4.0 for the Mac and the SBLGNT; this issue is known and we will make a service release of Logos 4 Mac available in the next few days to fix the problem. You can still use the resource, the problem is with navigation by book/chapter/verse.
2. Available in Print
The SBLGNT will be published in print by the SBL. Copies will be available at the Annual Meeting of the SBL in Atlanta this November and subsequently can be purchased from the SBL web site. Curious to how it will look? Check out this sample of John 1:1–4:15. PDF will be available for download in late November or early December.
3. Available on the iPhone, iPad, and Biblia.com
The SBLGNT and its apparatus are or will shortly be available on Biblia.com and also for the Logos iPhone, iPod and iPad app.

4. Revised LEB
Hall Harris has revised and updated the Lexham English Bible (LEB) New Testament to be a translation of the SBLGNT. If you are a Logos user, and you have the LEB (which is also freely available if you don’t have it yet), then the update will be available to you as well. If you use Logos 4, the update will come automatically if it hasn’t already. If you have a Logos 4 package that includes a reverse interlinear to the LEB, that will be updated (to reflect the SBLGNT) as well. We hope for this update to be released by the end of this week.
5. Free PDF
To make the textual relationship between the SBLGNT and the LEB as transparent as possible for even those who are not Logos users, we’ve produced a PDF version of the Lexham English Bible English-Greek Reverse Interlinear New Testament. Using this material, you can see how different words/clauses/phrases of the SBLGNT were translated by the LEB, in context. This is available on the SBLGNT Download page and scroll down to find it.
Now, the details:
You can head to the SBLGNT web site for more detail. Read the Preface and the Introduction to learn more about why and how the SBLGNT was created. And it’s sure to be discussed on the Logos forums, so check there too.
And, if you’re a Logos user, there will be even more SBLGNT-related goodness coming in the next week.
The bottom line:
We’re really excited about this new edition of the Greek New Testament. We think it will be useful not only in the context of Logos Bible Software, but also for those studying, analyzing and working with the text of the Greek New Testament on a regular basis.

Get Your Bible Study Tip Published

Torrence

Today’s guest post is from Rebecca Kruyswijk, the Associate Editor of Bible Study Magazine.

If you subscribe to Bible Study Magazine, you may have come across a new section in the Nov-Dec ‘10 issue: Bible Study Tips. In this issue, we’re publishing Bible study tips from readers like you.

The vision of Bible Study Magazine is to get people into the Word. We’re not looking for a niche readership. We believe that, given the right tools and methods for Bible study, anyone can be a theologian. This has been our mission since Bible Study Magazine went to press two years ago, and it’s still our goal today. (As a side note, it is our birthday and we do accept cake donations.)

It’s not just the experts that have something valuable to say about Bible study. We’re looking for Bible study tips from anyone who is passionate about studying the Word. That’s where you come in. Contribute a Bible study tip. Join the conversation, and perhaps someone might benefit from your perspective.

How can you weigh in for future issues? It’s simple. Go to our Facebook page and “like” us—if you haven’t already. Then post your Bible study tips on our wall. Tips can be short or long, general or specific.

James Hamrick contributed this tip to the Nov-Dec ’10 issue:

“Write down every verb used for God. The God of Genesis is one who sees, learns, walks, speaks and maybe even wrestles.”

And RC Clyde added this:

“Keep it simple: 1) Get a Bible you can understand. 2) Pray to God before you start. 3) Let God show you His Word; don’t draw your own answer. 4) Find a good commentary.”

Take a moment to consider your own Bible study methods, and then share them with the rest of the Bible Study Magazine community. Join the conversation and help someone else get into the Word.

Improving Your Bible Study with Dictionaries

TorrenceToday’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

“Don’t let commentaries rob you of the joy of discovery!”

This little bit of advice from my New Testament professor has really stuck with me, and shaped the way I study the Bible. Rather than simply reaching for one of hundreds of great commentaries out there, I now look for another way. It’s not that my professor was against commentaries and forbade us from using them. Far from it. He simply recognized that studying the Bible should be a thrilling adventure full of twists, turns, detours, and discovery. For the student of Scripture, jumping to a commentary was akin to skipping to the final chapter of a novel: you get the gist of what happened, but you miss out in the process. Instead, the commentary should be a conversation partner that helps balance your own discoveries with someone more experienced than you.

This didn’t mean you could simply open a Bible, read a passage once, and expect to understand it completely. There are occasional obscurities and difficulties that need assistance to resolve before we can reach that place of discovery. To aid us in our discovery, he recommended a whole host of tools to put in our box: lexicons, grammars, apparatuses, and my favorite of the bunch—dictionaries.

[Read more...]

Discovering Community on the Logos Forums

collections

Today’s guest blogger is Kevin Becker, a Logos Forum MVP.

My first foray into Logos’ forums was on the day that Logos 4 was released. I was looking to download a particular file but I couldn’t find the download link on Logos’ website. Sure enough, the helpful forum folk provided the link.

I downloaded my software and it started indexing. As I poked around, I realized that, while many things were familiar from Libronix, other things were foreign. I knew I needed help, so I returned to the forum, and I’ve been reading and posting ever since. It’s rewarding to help someone figure out how to leverage Logos to do Bible study. I love imagining people sitting around the world having “Aha!” moments, not just from figuring out how to use Logos’ power but from the discoveries they make as they study God’s word. The forum has become a ministry.

I’ve also reaped great benefits from learning many things from the collective wisdom of forum participants. I wouldn’t know how to use the syntax search with any confidence if not for other gracious forum members teaching me. Logos’ leadership and employees also participate in the forums. My confidence in my e-book investment has grown as I’ve seen them act with grace and wisdom. They really listen to user suggestions; I’ve seen numerous suggestions make their way into Logos 4.

I also love the community on the forums. There are active users from all over the world. I’ve enjoyed learning about different cultures; American, British, and Australian flavors of English are all present, plus many for whom English is a second (or third or fourth or fifth) language. It is a blessing to have a close reminder of the global scope of Christ’s bride.

The most unique cross-cultural experience I’ve had has been helping Ghebreab, an African man living in Germany who uses Logos to prepare for a Bible study. One day, he was having trouble understanding a particular thread on the forum so we started corresponding via email. We then began talking on the telephone and using remote desktop software so I could interact with his computer and show him what I was talking about, step by step. We don’t always understand each other, but I love actually getting to hear the moment when something clicks for Ghebreab, when he grasps how he can use a particular feature of Logos 4 to help him study the Bible and then bring it before his study group. And I get to be a part of it—how cool is that!?

So, in the end, it is not learning how to use Logos, catching the latest news about the company, or running up a ridiculously high post count that keeps me coming back to the forums but the sense of community there, in studying the Bible and helping others. If you don’t use the forum , please stop by and ask your questions and contribute ideas and solutions. I think you’ll find, as I have, that you’ll learn a lot more than how to use your Bible software.

Logos 4: Instant Information

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

As you know, we live in an instant world: instant coffee, instant oatmeal, instant potatoes! Sometimes, even as we study the Bible, we need instant information. We need a quick definition, a pronunciation of a Greek word, a few cross references and the like. Well, Logos is here to help:

  • Open an English Bible such as the ESV to a specific passage like Acts 17.16
  • Choose the Tools menu
  • Select Information
  • By default the Information panelopens on the right hand side of the screen

Now rest your cursor on a word like Athens. Notice the data in the Information panel. Now move to the word provoked. More instant information! This panel is available to you wherever you are in the Bible offering previews oftremendous amounts of research. When you need to dig deeper, just click one of the links in the Information panel.

Grudem’s Systematic Theology Available for Download

Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine

Logos 4 users have been asking for a downloadable version of Grudem’s Systematic Theology for years. Now, we’re pleased to announce that it’s finally available—and it’s 20% off!

Why Grudem?

For years, Grudem has been a steadfast proponent of classic evangelical theology. He has taught at both Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Phoenix Seminary, and he’s written numerous books and more than sixty articles in both popular and academic journals.

Grudem is also a gifted communicator, which has made his Systematic Theology more accessible and readable than perhaps any other available.

J. I. Packer has written that “if you were hoping to find a theology that seeks your spiritual no less than your intellectual formation, rejoice: Wayne Grudem has written exactly what you wanted.” Numerous other scholars agree—and you can read their thoughts on the Grudem product page.

A Downloadable Version for Logos 4 Users

With a downloadable version of Grudem’s Systematic Theology, you can begin reading and studying it today. Simply add it to your cart, and Logos 4 will begin downloading it automatically.

With the CD-ROM, you had to wait for the disk to ship, install it into Libronix, and then scan your drive to get the resources to work in Logos 4.

That’s a thing of the past. Logos 4 makes downloads easier than ever, which means you can begin reading Grudem’s Systematic Theology today!

Of course, if you’re still using Libronix, you can still get the download.

20% Off!

Even better, you can get Grudem’s Systematic Theology for 20% off. This discount is available on both the CD-ROM and the download. If you’ve been waiting for a downloadable version of Grudem, this is the perfect time to add it to your library!

You should follow us on Twitter here.

10 Great Anglican Resources on Pre-Pub

Anglican
Today’s guest post is by Elliot Ritzema, from the Logos Bible Software Design & Editorial team.

With around 400 resources currently on the Pre-Pub page, it can be hard to find a path through all the options to what really may interest you. For example, there are several collections with titles like “The Whole/Complete/Exhaustive/Collected Works of _____.” Some of these people are widely read and recognized. Others you may recognize but don’t know much about. Still others may be names that you’ve never heard of.

To keep from being overwhelmed by all the choices, I like to group resources by something they have in common. For those of you who are Anglican, or interested in Anglican history and theology, here are ten sets currently gathering interest or under development. Here they are, arranged chronologically:

  1. Thomas Cranmer Collection
  2. Cranmer (1489-1556) was a leader of the English Reformation and was Archbishop of Canterbury when the Church of England separated from the Catholic Church. He is responsible for compiling and writing the Book of Common Prayer.

  3. The Works of that Learned and Judicious Divine, Mr. Richard Hooker
  4. Hooker’s (1554-1600) writings, especially Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (in which he tried to find a middle way between Catholicism and Puritanism) were very influential on later Anglicanism as well as political theory.

  5. The Whole Works of the Rev. John Lightfoot
  6. Lightfoot (1602-1675) was a clergyman and rabbinical scholar who attended the Westminster Assembly. This collection includes his account of the first two years of the assembly, among other writings. He is also the author of A Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica.

  7. The Works of George Whitefield
  8. Whitefield (1714-1770) was an evangelist who often paid little attention to sectarian distinctions, but I’ve included him here because he was a lifelong member of the Church of England. This collection includes many of his letters and sermons, as well as five biographical works.

  9. The Works of Augustus M. Toplady
  10. He is best known as the writer of the hymn “Rock of Ages.” In early years Toplady (1740-1778) was influenced by John Wesley, but later he became a convinced (and often polemical) Calvinist.

  11. A Practical View of Christianity
  12. William Wilberforce (1759-1833) is famous for his efforts to abolish the slave trade in the British Empire, but he also worked to reform British morality as a whole by encouraging people to adopt “serious religion.” He wrote this book to that end, as is shown by its full title: A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians in the Higher and Middle Classes in this Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity. It was a bestseller.

  13. Collected Works of John Henry Newman
  14. He famously converted to Catholicism in mid-life (and was recently beatified by the Catholic Church), but Newman (1801-1890) began his public career as an Anglican active in the Oxford Movement. This collection of his writings should be of interest not only to both Catholics and Anglicans, but also those interested in 19th-century English history and lovers of great writing. Excerpts from Newman’s Apologia Pro Vita Sua and The Idea of a University, among other works, have appeared in collections like the Norton Anthology of English Literature.

  15. J.C. Ryle Collection
  16. Ryle (1816-1900) was bishop of Liverpool from 1880 until his death. He was a leader of the evangelical wing of the Church of England, and his writings were influenced by Puritan theology. In turn, his book Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties and Roots influenced a young J.I. Packer.

  17. Joseph Barber Lightfoot Collection
  18. Not to be confused with John Lightfoot, J.B. Lightfoot (1828-1889) was bishop of Durham from 1879 until his death. He is known today primarily as a New Testament and patristic scholar. This collection includes lecture notes, commentary manuscripts and sermons which are not included in his other books that are published by Logos.

  19. Edwin Hatch Collection
  20. Hatch (1835-1889) was a Greek scholar and church historian. His Essays in Biblical Greek is shipping next month. This collection focuses on his historical writing, and includes his controversial The Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages Upon the Christian Church.

    Finally, I will call your attention to a collection that does not deal exclusively with Anglicanism:

  21. Christianity in the British Isles Collection (6 vols)
  22. This collection contains some fantastic and informative resources like Anglicanism and the Christian Church: Theological Resources in Historical Perspective by Paul Avis and The Free Church of England: Introduction to an Anglican Tradition by John Fenwick.

If I haven’t mentioned your favorite Anglican resource on Pre-Pub, feel free to mention them in a comment below.