Logos 4: Create a Shortcut to The Biblical World Map

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

Within the past few weeks I’ve received several emails regarding Biblical Places and maps within Logos 4. This blog summarizes some of the instruction I passed along to fellow Logos users.

Prior to the release of Logos 4, the Logos company commissioned the creation of numerous new maps which only appear in the Bible Facts tool, Biblical Places. These new Logos 4 maps are NOT displayed as a separate resource in the Library. In other words, if you want to see a new Logos 4 map for Corinth then generate a Biblical Places report for that city.

One of the new Logos 4 maps, The Biblical World, is somewhat dynamic or interactive in that it hides or shows locations depending on the size of the image:

  • Choose Tools | Biblical Places.
  • Type a city like Ephesus in the Place box. (1)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the report.
  • Click The Biblical World map in the “filmstrip” at the bottom to display that map. (2)
  • Zoom out or in on the image to show or hide different locations.
    • Windows: Press Ctrl + + or Ctrl + – to zoom out or in.
    • Mac: Use the scroll feature on your mouse or touchpad to zoom out or in.

ShortcutBiblicalWorldMap.jpg

To center The Biblical World map on a specific a location:

  • Type a location like Athens in the Place box.
  • Press the Enter key.
  • Notice The Biblical World map automatically adjusts placing the desired location in the center of the window.

To save The Biblical World map as a Favorite or Bookmark:

  • Choose Tools | Favorites.
  • Make sure The Biblical World map is displayed in the Biblical Places window.
  • Drag the Biblical Places tab to the Favorites area or on top of a Bookmark number.
  • Click either the Favorite or Bookmark to open Biblical Places right to the The Biblical World map.

To place The Biblical World map on the Shortcuts bar:

  • Save The Biblical World map as a Favorite or Bookmark as explained above.
  • Drag the Favorite or Bookmark link from the Favorites / Bookmarks pane to the Shortcuts bar.
  • Click the new Shortcuts icon to always open Biblical Places to the The Biblical World map (if you just drag the Biblical Places tab from the Logos desktop to the Shortcuts bar the new icon will always open Biblical Places to its last location not  The Biblical World map).

Having The Biblical World map as a shortcut icon gives you instant access to this basic albeit interactive map so you can quickly see a desired location!

What map do you think is the most interesting? Leave a comment and let us know!

How the Resurrection Transformed Peter, You, and Me

Logos Talk is bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

What Happened to Peter?

Like Steve Runge, I identify with Peter. Not only am I encouraged by Peter’s missteps,  foibles, and failures, but I’m also challenged by the post-resurrection dynamo that Peter becomes. For Peter, Jesus’ return changed everything; Peter is restored, commissioned, and empowered by the Holy Spirit. This brash fisherman who would hide and disassociate himself from Jesus (Mk 14:66-72) becomes the one who stands before the crowds on Pentecost—calling 3,000 people to repentance.

Peter, who had been hit-or-miss throughout the gospels, now gives one of the most impassioned sermons in the Scriptures. His message features this powerful testimony to the resurrection:

“Israelite men, listen to these words! Jesus the Nazarene, a man attested to you by God with deeds of power and wonders and signs that God did through him in your midst, just as you yourselves know—this man, delivered up by the determined plan and foreknowledge of God, you executed by nailing to a cross through the hand of lawless men. God raised him up, having brought to an end the pains of death, because it was not possible for him to be held by it.” (Acts 2:22-24 LEB)

The imagery of death being unable to hold captive the Son of Man is beautiful. I love the way that Bertrand communicates it in the TDNT, “The abyss can no more hold the Redeemer than a pregnant woman can hold the child in her body.”

Resurrection: A Living Hope

Peter’s sermon shows that something dramatic, something supernatural, had happened inside of him. And Peter clearly communicates the origin of this change in the salutation of his first epistle:

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who according to his great mercy has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead . . . (1 Peter 1:3)

Christ’s resurrection had changed everything; because of this, Peter overflowed with life-giving hope. This resurrection transformed Peter entirely, from his status before God (1 Peter 3:21) to his responsibility to others (1 Peter 1:22-23).

Easter is a good opportunity to ask myself important questions. Do I make decisions based on short-term gain or living hope? Am I still impacted and motivated by the resurrection, or, better yet, am I living in a way that only makes sense in light of the resurrection?

Peter’s life reminds me that the resurrection isn’t part of the Christian faith; it is the Christian faith. What reason do I have not to live boldly and courageously? I live on this side of the resurrection.

What does the resurrection mean to you? Let us know in the comments, and check out our discounted Holy Week resources.

5 Allusions to Psalm 22 at Christ’s Crucifixion

Logos Talk is bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

Psalm 22 stands out among the Psalms in its depiction of the psalmist’s agony and suffering. It is no wonder that Jesus quoted the psalmist’s anguished cry of “my God, my God why have you forsaken me?” as he died on the cross. However, this is not the only reference to Psalm 22 in the gospel accounts of Christ’s death. In fact, there are five possible allusions. None of these allusions refer to Jesus’ physical suffering; instead, they focus on the rejection and contempt He experienced while paying the penalty for our sins.

  1. Psalm 22:18“they divide my garments among them, and for my clothing they cast lots.”  The psalmist says this to portray how close he is to death. His enemies are anticipating his death so much that they have already divided his clothes among themselves. All four gospels describe this event with John taking it further by describing it as a fulfillment of Scripture (Jn 19:23–24; Mt 27:35; Mk 15:24; Lk 23:34).
  2. Psalm 22:7—“they wag their heads.” The psalmist’s description of people’s reaction to him indicates their scorn and derision. Both Matthew and Mark allude to this: “And those who passed by derided him, wagging their heads” (Mt 27:39; Mk 15:29). Just like the psalmist, Jesus experienced rejection and ridicule by people. How difficult it must have been for the Son of God to endure such contempt for those he was sacrificing himself to save!
  3. Psalm 22:8—He trusts in the LORD; let him deliver him . . .  for He delights in him.” In Psalm 22 the psalmist wrestled with God’s silence. Despite his cries, God did not answer or deliver him (Ps 22:1–5). Because of God’s apparent absence, this taunt would have especially stung. Only Matthew includes a reference to this verse as he describes the crowd mocking Jesus for His trust in God: “He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if he desires him” (Mt 27:43). Jesus also prayed to be delivered from His suffering, while still submitting Himself to God’s will (Mt 26:39). To be mocked for His humble submission to God’s must have been particularly painful for Christ.
  4. Psalm 22:1—“my God, my God why have you forsaken me?” The opening line of Psalm 22 beautifully expresses the anguish of the psalmist. He is suffering greatly, but his chief concern is that God—the source of his trust and deliverance—appears to have abandoned him. Matthew and Mark both attribute these words to Jesus (Mt 27:46; Mk 15:34). Jesus’ physical sufferings pale in comparison to the trauma of being forsaken by God as he takes the weight of our sin upon himself
  5. Psalm 22:31—he has done it.” Psalm 22 ends, not with suffering, but with praise as the psalmist worships God for delivering him (Ps 22:25–31). He enthusiastically proclaims God’s act of salvation and deliverance throughout the world and to all generations. The final line—which consists of one word in Hebrew—can be translated either “he has done it” or simply “it is done.” Jesus may be alluding to this when he says—with one word in Greek—“it is finished” (Jn 19:30). Christ’s dying words carry many implications: God’s plan of salvation has been completed; our sin is paid for; Christ’s work on earth is done. Perhaps it is also a shout of praise like the psalmist’s words in Psalm 22:31. It is finished. God’s ultimate deliverance has been carried out. Just as the psalmist proclaimed God’s deliverance of him, so should we proclaim Christ’s work of salvation on the cross to the ends of the earth and throughout all generations.

What crucifixion imagery impacts you the most in the gospel accounts? Leave us a comment and let us know, then take a look at our special Holy Week resources.

Free Francis Chan Books from Vyrso!

Vyrso’s free Francis Chan offer has expired. Check out Vyrso’s April sale for more freebies and special offers. 

Vyrso.com is offering Francis Chan’s Crazy Love, Forgotten God, and Erasing Hell for free. This very special offer is only available until Saturday, April 7, at 11:59 p.m. (PST), so get your free ebooks and share this opportunity with your friends!

Francis Chan, founding pastor of Cornerstone Church in Simi Valley, CA, released Crazy Love: Overwhelmed by a Relentless God in 2008. This powerful book about falling in love with God shot to the top of the New York Times Bestseller list, selling over 175,000 copies in the first year.

Giving all of Crazy Love’s royalties away to the charitable Isaiah 58 Fund, he began work on Forgotten God: Reversing Our Neglect of the Holy Spirit. This message of embracing a life led by the Holy Spirit also resonated with readers, and Forgotten God was on many bestseller lists as well.

In 2011, Chan released his third book Erasing Hell, where he examines what the Scripture says about the afterlife, an issue Chan says, “we can’t afford to get wrong.”

These ebooks can be read on:

Don’t wait! This amazing offer is only available through Saturday, April 7. Jump over to Vyrso’s special Francis Chan page and get your free ebooks now!

Save on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Works for a Limited Time

Who stands fast? Only the man whose final standard is not his reason, his principles, his conscience, his freedom, or his virtue, but who is ready to sacrifice all this when he is called to obedient and responsible action in faith and in exclusive allegiance to God—the responsible man, who tries to make his whole life an answer to the call of God.”—Dietrich Bonhoeffer

The definitive edition of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s works and letters is on Pre-Pub. This 15-volume collection features Bonhoeffer’s significant contributions to Christology and Christian ethics, biographical information, and correspondence. The Pre-Pub price of $339.95 is a limited-time savings—the price goes up Wednesday, April 11.

It is difficult to separate Bonhoeffer’s legacy from the turbulent times that birthed his theology. A vehement anti-fascist, he became a double-agent in the German military intelligence organization Abwehr. Bonhoeffer, after wrestling with the ethical implications, joined a small resistance group within the Abwehr with the intention to assassinate Hitler.

Bonhoeffer was arrested on April 6, 1943. Although his custody wasn’t in connection to any assassination attempts, Hitler eventually uncovered Bonhoeffer’s part as an Abwehr conspirator. Bonhoeffer was led to the scaffold in the Flossenbürg concentration camp on April 9, 1945—only days before the American liberation of the camp. Bonhoeffer’s last reported words were, “This is the end . . . for me, the beginning of life.”

The Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Works collection includes Letters and Papers from Prison, a brilliant collection of correspondence that reveals the spiritual foundation alluded to in Bonhoeffer’s theological writings. Whether discussing the evolution of his theological thought, the difficulties of life in prison, or everyday trivialities, Bonhoeffer’s letters are marked by a steadfast devotion to God—a devotion which influenced all who came in contact with him.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Works goes up in price on April 11, so don’t wait. Order your copy today to get this limited-time discount!

Following the Unexpected Christ

Logos Talk is bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

Expectation

Expectations play a huge role in how we process life. Whenever I’m frustrated that God’s plan doesn’t match my expectations, the Apostle Peter’s experience gives me renewed hope.

During Jesus’ last Passover celebration with his disciples, he states that he is pursuing a path they couldn’t follow. Peter makes it clear that this doesn’t meet his expectations (Jn 13:37), even exclaiming that he’s willing to lay down his life for Jesus! Imagine hearing Jesus’ response: “Will you lay down your life for me? Truly, truly I say to you, the rooster will not crow until you have denied me three times!” (Jn 13:38 LEB).

Discouragement

This disheartening response builds upon Peter’s expectations, but in a way he doesn’t expect. At Peter’s first meeting with Jesus, Jesus changes his name to the Rock (Jn 1:40-42). After many of the disciples start leaving Jesus, the Lord asks the 12 if they’re leaving too. Peter is the first to respond, “Lord, to whom would we go? You have the words of eternal life” (Jn 6:66-68 LEB). At this point, it seems that Peter has it all figured out: He is willing to die for Jesus and publicly proclaim Jesus’ reign.

But then there are times where Jesus’ actions run counter to Peter’s expectations of what the Christ should do—in these moments, we see everything change for Peter. When Jesus wants to wash Peter’s feet, Peter says, “Lord, are you going to wash my feet? . . . You will never wash my feet!” (Jn 13:6-8 LEB). We see the same kind of response in Gethsemane as Jesus is being arrested; Peter attempts to prevent it by striking someone with his sword (Jn 18:10-11). Acquiescence  isn’t what he expects of the Christ! It seems that he expects a zealous savior to overthrow Rome, and responds as such. He expects to die fighting, and so he chooses to do so.

Yet the most disturbing portrait of Peter is his denial of Jesus—exactly as Jesus foretold (Jn 18:15-18, 25-27). Whatever indignation Peter might have felt at Jesus’ prediction must have changed to incalculable regret, and shame. What had begun so promisingly, what Peter had declared that he would give his life for, seems to turn to ashes right before him.

Redemption

Let us be thankful that the story doesn’t end here! John’s gospel offers us an amazing picture of restoration. Peter seems shocked that the tomb is indeed empty (Jn 20:2-9), but we’re left wondering if there is still a place for him. Is there a way back from his shattered expectations and disappointment? We find our answer when Jesus interviews him on the beach, questioning him about his love. Jesus demonstrates that there is indeed a way back (Jn 21:15-19); it begins by exchanging our expectations for a willingness to follow in Jesus’ steps: to love him and others.

What are we expecting this Easter week? If it is anything other than humbly following Jesus, it’s time to reset our expectations.

Logos to Translate Works of Thomas Aquinas into English for the First Time!

Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) is certainly one of the most important theologians in history. His immense corpus of work covers every aspect of Christian life and doctrine, penetrating to the core of mankind’s relationship with God. Despite its undeniable importance, much of Aquinas’ work remains available only in Latin. That’s about to change. Logos is going to translate his Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, Commentary on the Prophet Isaiah, and Commentary on the Prophet Jeremiah into English.

Aquinas wrote three major works of theology. His Summa Theologica (1265–1274) and Summa Contra Gentiles (1264?) have been available in English for almost a century. But his third major piece, his Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, remains untranslated. Aquinas wrote the Commentary on the Sentences in his twenties as a brand new professor at the University of Paris. The commentary influenced his contemporaries and remains heavily cited by modern theologians. In it, Aquinas broached topics that would dominate his later works, such as the relationship between Aristotelian philosophy and theology. It also offers Aquinas’ most sustained treatments of ecclesiology and sacramental theology.

Translating these works is an extensive, expensive project; that’s where the Logos Pre-Pub system comes in. We can bring together thousands of people from around the world to finally make these resources available in English. This translation will be a major event in Thomist studies, and everyone who places a pre-order is a direct part of it.

Logos’ translations of the commentaries on Jeremiah and Isaiah will likewise have a large impact on the study of Aquinas’ thought. Aquinas is gaining attention as more scholars realize that his thought was built on a profoundly scriptural foundation. Indeed, some scholars have suggested that our whole interpretation of Thomas’ work must be re-visited in light of his biblical commentaries. Logos’ translations of the commentaries of Jeremiah and Isaiah will be a huge contribution to these exciting developments.

Thomas Aquinas’ thought is remarkably valuable, and it is amazing that after 750 years so much of it remains inaccessible to the majority of English speakers. Logos is remedying this. You can help! Place your Pre-Pub orders today.

Save 75% on Logos March Madness Champion N. T. Wright!

After a 3-week tournament with 64 authors and nearly 200,000 cumulative votes, you’ve voted N.T. Wright the champion of Logos March Madness! He may have got the votes, but you’re the real winner—right now you get 75% off a selection of N.T. Wright’s works. Use coupon code 7MM12 to get the deals.We’ve also discounted a selection of runner-up, D. A. Carson’s works by 60%. Use coupon code 6MM12 for these deals.

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Help others find the best deal; tell us which winning resources you would recommend!

Free Book of the Month: John Bunyan’s Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners

John Bunyan’s classic Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners is April’s Free Book of the Month!

“. . . as I was sitting by the fire, I suddenly felt this word to sound in my heart, I must go to Jesus; at this my former darkness and atheism fled away, and the blessed things of heaven were set within my view.”John Bunyan

John Bunyan, one of history’s most prominent Puritans, traces his own spiritual pilgrimage in Grace Abounding. He describes his trials, temptations, and sorrows, as well as how he came to rely on Christ for his every need.

Bunyan penned Grace Abounding while he was imprisoned (for preaching without a license), as a letter of encouragement to his congregation, Bunyan’s story of conversion continues to encourage Christians today.

You can get this book for free all month long, and when you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the 61-volume Works of John Bunyan Collection.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download your free book and enter the giveaway!

Jesus’ Final Week: A Closer Look

Logos Talk will be bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

Jesus and his disciples entered Jerusalem and spent the night in Bethany (Mark 11:11). Jesus knew that he would be arrested, tried, and crucified later that week. How does he use this last stretch of time?

  • He curses the fig tree (Mk 11:12-14, 20-25; Mt 21:18-22)
  • He cleanses the temple (Mk 11:15-17; Mt 21:12-13; Lk 19:45-46)
  • He teaches in the temple (Mk 11:27-12:12; Mt 21:23-22:14; Lk 20:1-19)
  • He predicts the destruction of the temple and last things (Mk 13:1-37; Mt 24:1-25:46; Lk 21:5-36)
  • He is anointed in Bethany (Mk 14:3-9; Mt 26:6-13; cf. Jn 12:1-8 and Lk 7:37-39)

Have you ever noticed how many of Jesus’ parables are taught during this week? How about the growing frequency of interactions he has with authorities in Jerusalem?

When I step back and look at it all (through the lens of hindsight), it looks like Jesus is preparing himself and his disciples for his crucifixion and resurrection.

Jesus in the Temple

Jesus cleanses the temple and heals people who need help. For this, the authorities hated him even more.

After this, Jesus engages in a “stump-the-teacher” session with all sorts of folks, answering questions about paying taxes, resurrection, and the greatest commandment. And those are just the questions we know about. I don’t know about you, but I get the sense that many of these questions were tests to see how good Jesus was. Sort of how we all (whether we admit to it or not) have “test passages” we like to use when examining commentaries or study Bibles. Jesus passed this questioning with flying colors, of course, because he is Jesus. If someone had questions about Jesus and what he taught, that person’s larger concerns may have been answered by this session.

So Jesus and his disciples leave the temple area. After his disciples respond in awe to the size and beauty of the temple complex (Mk 13:1), Jesus says that it will all be destroyed (Mk 13:2). He was beginning to focus them on the gospel that really matters instead of the magnificent architecture and beauty of human effort.

The Mount of Olives

From here he goes on to the Mount of Olives (Mk 13:3-37; Mt 24:1-25:45, called the “Olivet Discourse” by some) and begins to talk about end times. Jesus’ prophecy can be paraphrased: “Horrible, unthinkable things will happen, and then it’ll get worse. Help those who need help. Watch and be ready for my return. It’ll happen; I will be back.”

Afterward, in Bethany, during dinner at Simon the leper’s house, a woman, nameless in Matthew and Mark (Mk 14:3-9; Mt 26:6-13), dumps a bunch of expensive perfume on Jesus’ feet. Jesus says she is helping prepare his body for burial. That’s very weird for us to read—imagine what the folks at dinner were thinking! But Jesus said it was a beautiful thing.

Yes, I think Jesus was getting ready for his crucifixion, and he was getting his disciples ready, too. Take some time today or tomorrow to look at the steps he took and the things he taught, and let Jesus get you ready to experience his death, and (praise God!) celebrate his resurrection.

Leave us a comment and tell us how you’re remembering Jesus this week, and check out our special Holy Week resources.