Logos 4: Place Highlighting Notes in Book Specific Note Files

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials. mp|seminars Tips

In my previous two blogs I explained that in Logos 4.5 each time we highlight text, that highlighted text becomes a Highlighting Note placed in whatever Note File we designate. Let’s combine those features for a specific application. Let’s say we’re reading and highlighting Biblical Ethics (Ethics) by Oswald Chambers. We want all of these and only these Highlighting Notes in one Note File.

  • Choose File | Notes to create a new Note File.
  • Name the Note File Biblical Ethics (or the title of whatever book you’re reading).
  • Choose Tools | Highlighting.
  • Decide which palette of Highlighting styles you’re going to use to mark up Ethics, such as Solid Colors which we’ll employ in our example.
  • Rest the cursor on the name of the palette such as Solid Colors.
  • Click the arrow that appears at the right of the title bar for the palette (1).
  • Click the Save in drop down list at the bottom of the menu (2).
  • Click Most recent note file (3).

You’ve just instructed Logos to place all of your Highlighting Notes created with Solid Colors in the most recently used Note File which in this case is Biblical Ethics. Read and mark up Ethics which places all of those Highlighting Notes in the Note File Biblical Ethics. If you want you can use the Print / Export option on the panel menu of the Note File to produce a hard or digital copy of those notes. While this is not the only way to accomplish this result, here’s a great advantage to utilizing the method I just described.

We’re probably going to be reading several books at the same time and in all likelihood prefer using the same palette of styles. If so, with this method all we have to do is create a Note File for each book we’re reading and make sure to open it before highlighting any text in the book. Remember, our Highlighting Notes made with Solid Colors go to the most recently used Note File.

So if you’re reading another book such as Concise Theology by J. I. Packer, create a Note File for it. Read and mark up the book which places those Solid Colors notes in the Concise Theology Note File. To switch back to the Biblical Ethics Note File just open it. Now markup text in Ethics which places those new Notes in the most recently used Note File which again is Biblical Ethics!

I know this may sound confusing, but after you apply this method a couple of times, it will work as silk for you. And remember, you can download for FREE the new Notes and Highlighting chapters from the updated Logos Bible Software Training Manuals Volumes 1 and 2. Enjoy!

What new highlighting feature have you found the most helpful? Leave a comment and let us know!

Weekly Roundup: March 3

The Weekly Roundup is a regular feature alerting you to significant things happening at Logos this week. Take a few moments to check out these newsworthy items for the week of March 3, 2012.

Did You Get Your Free Book?

The Free Book of the Month for March is Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ Authentic Christianity. Go to the Free Book of the Month page and download it today. And, while you’re there, enter to win the 10-volume Selected Works of Martyn Lloyd-Jones!

Don’t Forget To “Take the Tour!

Would you like to visit Bellingham, WA, get two passes to our National Camp Logos, and tour the Logos facility? You can win an all-expense-paid trip to do just that! Take the virtual tour and enter to win.

Social Media

Pinterest

Vyrso

Logos Talk

Pre-Pubs

New Pre-Pubs

Last Chance Pre-Pubs

These are Pre-Pubs shipping next week. Don’t miss your last chance to pick these up at their amazing Pre-Pub prices!

Community Pricing

Check out the latest collections from Community Pricing:

Don’t miss out on these collections nearing the 100% mark!

Job Postings

Logos is hiring! Here are just a few of the newest postings on our Careers page:

Marketing Department

Graphic Design and Video

Sales

Software Development

Publications

Ministry Development

Customer Service

Finance

Operations

Was there anything else from Logos you found interesting this week? Leave us a comment and let us know!

The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection: A Charitable Discourse

In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas” (In necessary things unity; in uncertain things freedom; in everything compassion.)—Marco Antonio de Dominis

Doctrine matters; there’s no question about it. And yet, we live with the tension of standing firm on the things we believe while other educated and sincere believers interpret and apply Scripture differently. Is it possible to have a serious discussion without the conversation becoming contentious? The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection, currently on Pre-Pub, would say yes.

The Zondervan Counterpoint Collection exposes readers to perspectives written by contributors who affirm the inspiration and authority of Scripture yet vary in their judgment on a number of hot topics.

Each volume features essays on theological topics from a variety of scholars. Many essays are followed up by direct respectful responses/rebuttals from the other contributors. You can also find bibliographies and suggestions for further reading on many of the perspectives discussed.

The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection Upgrade features 3 volumes:

Four Views on Divine Providence

Three Views on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament

  • Single Meaning, Unified Referents: Accurate and Authoritative Citations of the Old Testament by the New Testament—Walter C. Kaiser Jr.
  • Single Meaning, Multiple Contexts and Referents: The New Testament’s Legitimate, Accurate, and Multifaceted Use of the Old—Darrell L. Bock
  • Fuller Meaning, Single Goal: A Christotelic Approach to the New Testament Use of the Old in Its First-Century Interpretive Environment—Peter Enns

Four Views on the Spectrum of Evangelicalism

The Zondervan Counterpoints Collection Upgrade augments the Zondervan Counterpoints Collection. In the 14-volume Zondervan Counterpoints Collection, you’ll find varied perspectives on topics like baptism, Revelation, eternal security,  and church growth. Contributors include Douglas MooJohn F. WalvoordNorman L. Geisler, and Craig S. Keener.

Pick up the Zondervan Counterpoints Collection Upgrade (3 vols.) on Pre-Pub today and strengthen your grasp of differing evangelical views and traditions. And don’t forget to check out the thought-provoking volumes in the 14-volume Zondervan Counterpoints Collection!

Powerful Resources for Old Testament Studies

Yesterday we looked at the  Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection, an 18-volume selection of academic writings—currently on Pre-Pub. If you are still in the market for Old Testament resources, check out the Fortress Press Hebrew Bible Collection (also on Pre-Pub).

The Fortress Press Hebrew Bible Collection’s 11 volumes affirm the importance of the Old Testament for today’s believer. If you’re looking for scholarly works to help you understand and communicate the unique character of the Hebrew Bible, this collection is right for you.

Take, for example, The Word Militant: Preaching a Decentering Word. This collection of essays from Columbia Theological Seminary’s Professor of Old Testament Walter Brueggemann honors the Old Testament’s destabilizing—and often contentious—nature.

The Word Militant is broken down into eleven chapters:

  1. Preaching as Reimagination
  2. The Preacher, the Text, and the People
  3. Ancient Utterance and Contemporary Hearing
  4. An Imaginative “Or”
  5. That the World May Be Redescribed
  6. The Social Nature of the Biblical Text for Preaching
  7. The Shrill Voice of the Wounded Party
  8. Life or Death: De-Privileged Communication
  9. Preaching to Exiles
  10. Preaching a Sub-Version
  11. Truth-Telling as Subversive Obedience

You might think from these chapter titles that the primary audience for Brueggeman’s essays is the expositor, but The Word Militant is as much a work on hermeneutics as it is a study on homiletics. Readers are challenged by the subversive and nonlinear nature of the Old Testament and encouraged to embrace its confrontational character.

This is only 1 of the 11 books available in this collection. You will also get an introduction to the Hebrew Bible, a history of Ancient Israel (including an in-depth look at the cultural backgrounds that influenced the Hebrew people and Scriptures), a theological discussion on the Holocaust, and a whole lot more.

This collection is under development now, so it won’t be on Pre-Pub long. You can still pick these up on Pre-Pub, but the window of opportunity is closing! Act now and add these powerful resources your Old Testament studies.

What Old Testament resource do you use the most? Leave us a comment and tell us about them!

Free for March: Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ Authentic Christianity

Authentic Christianity is March’s Free Book of the Month!

Martyn Lloyd-Jones, who died 31 years ago today (March 1), has been called “the finest biblical expositor of the twentieth century” by John MacArthur, and “one of the titanic figures of twentieth-century Christianity” by Al Mohler. Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ “logic on fire” preaching style has inspired many of today’s leading expositors.

Compiled from a series of messages preached during the peak of his ministry, Authentic Christianity features D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ comparison between modern Christianity and the early church. Here, Lloyd-Jones encourages readers to embrace the courage and faith of first-century Christians.

Don’t miss the opportunity to add this amazing volume to your library for free. Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download your copy today and enter for a chance to win the 10-volume Selected Works of Martyn Lloyd-Jones!

Save 80% on the Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection

The 18-volume Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection features comprehensive discussion on interpretive and literary criticism from international experts.

Biblical scholars from universities in Italy, Australia, Guatemala, England, Amsterdam, and the United States cover a broad tapestry of issues related to hermeneutics—issues like:

Many of the volumes in the Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection are in honor of influential biblical scholars. Gift of God in Due Season pays tribute to American Old Testament scholar and Dead Sea Scroll editor James W. Sanders, Sense and Sensitivity is written to memorialize Glasgow University Professor of Hebrew Bible and Semitic Studies Robert Carroll, and In Search of Wisdom is written in honor of Ronald E. Clements, Samuel Davidson professor of Old Testament at Kings College University of London. Other volumes written to honor biblical scholars include:

The Pre-Pub price for this collection offers you an incredible savings. Many of the volumes in this collection fetch prices well above $150. At Logos, pre-orders for this collection are only $199.95 (a savings of $800), and you get these titles tagged and working in tandem with the rest of your library.

If you’re looking for deep, penetrating studies on Old Testament interpretation, the Old Testament Hermeneutics Collection will be a valuable addition—at an astonishing value.

JSOTS: Old Testament Monographs Is Shipping Soon!

The Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplement (JSOTS) has brought cutting-edge scholarship to the academic community since 1976.  Through the years, JSOTS has enlisted leading scholars to provide penetrating insight into some of the most hotly debated topics in biblical studies today.

The Library of Hebrew Bible/OT Studies: JSOTS Old Testament Monographs continues this tradition of world-class scholarship with seven engaging volumes on critical issues in Old Testament studies. The Origin of the History of Israel, for example, challenges popular theories on the composition of the Pentateuch and the historical books by comparing their literary structure to the Histories of Herodotus. The Heythrop Journal praises this new approach by calling it “the most exciting development within Old Testament studies since the Graf-Wellhausen hypothesis.”  In The Image, the Depths and the Surface, Oxford professor Susan Gillingham confronts the issue of subjectivity in interpretation and discusses how readers can make sense of competing views of the Bible. Other volumes in this collection wrestle with issues of Old Testament hermeneutics, interpreting Song of Songs, and the history of the Ancient Near East.

So whether you’re studying, researching, or teaching on the Old Testament, JSOTS Old Testament Monographs is the perfect resource to aide your studies. Pick it up today for 87% off the retail price while it’s still on Pre-Pub.

Vyrso’s Selection Grows with David C. Cook

David C. Cook, publisher of discipleship materials for helping Christians grow and pass on their faith, has made many of their most popular titles available on Vyrso.

Now you can grow your faith with dynamic ebooks like:

Or experience powerful biographies:

Read life-changing fiction:

And guide your family through turbulent times with:

These David C. Cook ebooks (and many more!) can be read in the designated Vyrso reader (iPhone or Android), the Logos app (iPhone or Android), Logos 4, or online at Biblia.com. So what are you waiting for? Pick up some new David C. Cook titles from Vyrso today!

New Testament Reverse Interlinear Available for the NIV 2011

We have wrapped up work on the reverse interlinear for the NIV 2011 New Testament. If you have Logos 4 installed, a license for the NIV 2011 with reverse interlinears, and are set up to receive updates, the update should be automatic. The reverse interlinear for the NIV2011 Old Testament is well under way, we hope to release that later this year.

Growing up as a child of the late 70’s and early 80’s, the standard Bible in my church and home was the NIV. But I have to admit, I am less familiar with the TNIV and the NIV2011, so I was actually happy to work on this reverse interlinear project.

There has been both support and criticism for the NIV 2011, particularly as it handles what have come to be known as gender issues. I won’t comment on those, but I thought I’d highlight a few of the other changes between the 1984 NIV and the 2011 NIV.

Change 1: Is it “Christ” or “Messiah”?

The 1984 NIV used “Christ” to translate the Greek Χριστος (Christos) almost exclusively. There’s nothing wrong with that. But one refreshing change I noticed is that when Χριστος is used referring to the prophesied savior to come (mostly in the Gospels), the 2011 NIV uses “Messiah” instead of “Christ”. Elsewhere, where a particular person, Jesus, is referred to using Χριστος, the 2011 NIV uses “Christ” (or “Jesus Christ” or “Christ Jesus” as the Greek text warrants).

This is a refreshing change. I think sometimes we slip into thinking that “Christ” is Jesus’ last name, and this change helps us remember that in the Gospels it is a title referring to the Savior to come.

Change 2: Is it “Saints” or “Holy Ones”?

I was less excited about this change, but can understand why the committee made it. This typically shows up in the epistles. I think the change is primarily about focusing on the effect of Christ on someone (made holy) versus focusing on some sort of status ascribed to a person as a result of that effect. The use of “saint” today is different than it was in the 1970’s and 80’s when the NIV was originally translated, so some sort of change is defensible, though it wreaks havoc with the way I remember and have internalized the text since my younger days.

These are just a few of the larger, consistent changes between the 1984 and 2011 editions of the NIV. There were scads of smaller changes, as well. If you’re really interested in those sorts of details, and you have the 1984 NIV available in Logos, you can use Logos 4’s Bible Comparison features (Morris Proctor talks about it briefly here) to tease out all of the differences—even punctuation, which is sometimes very interesting!

If you don’t have NIV 2011, you can pick yours up today!

Has the NIV been beneficial to your Bible study? Leave us a comment and tell us how!

Logos 4: Place All Search Results in One Panel

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

If you’ve been to Camp Logos before you know that I’m a big fan of the right click menu. If you haven’t been then I encourage you to open a Bible in Logos and start right clicking. You can access many powerful features through this context sensitive menu that appears when you right click on a word.  This shortcut menu is especially helpful for searching. You can search for English words and phrases, Hebrew and Greek lemmas, references and more with the right click menu. You’ll notice, though, each time you execute a right mouse search you open a separate search panel. Generate five searches and get five search panels. It doesn’t take long to slow down your study as you try to navigate through all these search panels on the screen. Here’s how to avoid that:

  • Close all but one search panel
  • Choose the panel menu on that one search panel (A).
  • Select Send searches here (B).
  • Notice Logos places a target on the search panel menu (C).

Place All Search Results in One Panel

Now when you generate a right mouse search, the current search results will be removed and the new search hits will take their place!

If you need to get back to a previous search just click the Search History icon to the right of the search box.

This is but one of the numerous shortcuts contained on the New Time Saving Tips Volume 2 that Logos just posted as a Pre-pub.

The more shortcuts you use, the more streamlined your Bible study with Logos becomes. Most of these shortcuts come right out of my own personal use of the software.

You can read all about this new video training and place your order at the Logos website.

What Logos 4 shortcut do you use that you think is the most helpful? Leave a comment and let us know!