Logos March Madness: Round 2 Begins Today!

After a week of fierce face-offs, Logos March Madness: Round 1 voting has closed, and the number of competitors has been cut in half. Now you can save 30% on about 200 titles from the 32 authors who didn’t move on to Round 2.

Use coupon code 1MM12 to receive the discount.

Vote for your favorite authors at LogosMarchMadness.com today. There were several very close matches in the last round, so increase the chances of seeing your favorites move to the next round by sharing the page and telling your friends who you’re pulling for.

The competition is heating up—vote and save today!

Set Your Price on St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland

There’s no better time than St. Patrick’s Day to announce the two-volume St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland collection on Community Pricing.

Kidnapped from Britain by Welsh pirates at the age of 16, Patrick spent six years in Ireland as a slave. He eventually escaped and returned home where he joined the church. After spending 12 years in a monastery, Patrick felt called back to Ireland.

As Patrick remembers it:

“I saw a man coming, as it were from Ireland. His name was Victoricus, and he carried many letters, and he gave me one of them. I read the heading: ‘The Voice of the Irish.’ As I began the letter, I imagined in that moment that I heard the voice of those very people who were near the wood of Foclut, which is beside the western sea—and they cried out, as with one voice: ‘We appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us.’ “

Almost immediately after becoming a bishop, Patrick sailed back to Ireland. He  successfully won converts among the Gaelic Irish, even converting members of royal families. He established schools, set up churches, and developed clergy from among the natives who helped him to win even more converts.

For more than 600 years, missionaries from Ireland carried the gospel all around Europe, setting up missions in Scotland, Britain, Germany, Switzerland, and beyond. Throughout some of Europe’s darkest years, Patrick’s legacy shone bright.

Soon you’ll be able to add St. Patrick’s autobiography and writings to your Logos library. And with Community Pricing, you decide how much you want to pay. Place your bid on the St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland (2 vols.) today!

The Princeton Theological Review Is Now on Community Pricing

Just in time to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Princeton Theological Seminary’s founding, 443 issues of the original Princeton Theological Review are on Community Pricing!

Charles Hodge started this premier Christian journal in 1825 and its first run lasted over 100 years. Its contributors list reads like a theologian’s who’s who:

The Princeton Theological Journal has covered some of the most important subjects facing Christianity, including: evolution, slavery, biblical inerrancy, and education. The articles and authors are still widely cited today. Now Logos users can own every issue of The Princeton Theological Journal produced from 1825 to 1929. That’s 443 issues packed with theological insight from some of the nineteenth and twentieth century’s top Christian scholars. And with Logos, you can search each issue by topic, Scripture reference, or author.

You set the price!

It’s up to you. We’re putting this on Community Pricing, where you set the price. After you place your bid, there are all kinds of ways to get others on board and lower the price!

  • “Like” it on Facebook.
  • Tweet it.
  • Discuss it in the forums.
  • Email it to your friends and coworkers.
  • Write the link on a whiteboard at school.
  • Add a screenshot to your Pinterest board.
  • Make and wear a sandwich board.

The more people that get on board, the lower the price can go, so place your bid for The Princeton Theological Journal (443 issues) today!

Find Out Which Collections Are Available Individually!

Did you know that we occasionally break up collections and sell volumes individually? We do! In fact, here are a couple recent examples:

We are even in the process of splitting up Tabletalk (Feb. 1989–Jan. 2011) (264 Issues)!

How Can I Find Out When a Collection Is Broken Up?

While we don’t always announce the splitting up of a collection, there are ways to make sure you’re in the loop.

You can often get updated on recently broken collections in the forum thread, “Hey! they just broke this collection up!” The forum is an invaluable tool for all sorts of important information; if you haven’t gotten involved in the forums yet, don’t wait! This thread is updated semi-regularly. You can even subscribe to an RSS feed for this thread by clicking the
“Email me when someone replies” link at the top.

A quick way to see what new titles are available is to simply do an Individual Titles search on Logos.com and sort by newest. This is going to give you the latest resources—including  those which were recently in collections.

A Couple Things to Keep in Mind

More often than not, buying a collection offers the best value. A good example of this is the Brill Josephus and History Collection. This two-volume collection normally costs $309.95. If you were to buy these two titles separately, you would pay over $450. If you can manage it, you’re going to get a better deal when you purchase a collection.

Another thing we should point out is that occasional issues (like licensing) preclude us from being able to break up every collection. But if there are some collections you would like to see broken up which haven’t been, head over to Facebook and tell us which ones. We would love to have your input!

Now go check out some of the new resources we have available—and add a few to your library today!

Last Chance! Vyrso’s Huge Fiction Sale Ends Today

This is it—Vyrso’s huge Fiction under $4 Sale ends tonight! You have until midnight (PST) to take advantage of incredible deals on Christian fiction.

Vyrso has what you want: thrillers, romance, fantasy, crime drama, children’s books and more. And right now, you can get any Thomas Nelson fiction title from Vyrso for only $3.99.

Load up on bestselling authors like:

Choose any of the following package deals to save big on multiple titles!

The big Thomas Nelson Fiction under $4 sale ends tonight. But if you act fast, there is still time to save on inspirational fiction!

Have you picked up some fiction from Vyrso? Tell us about it!

J. Gresham Machen: Guardian of the Faith

From 1905 to 1937, J. Gresham Machen grew from a confused young theology student to one of the leading Reformed scholars of his day.

At first, Machen struggled with the liberal leanings of his professor, Wilhelm Herrman, but he  eventually rejected modernist theology and embraced conservative Reformed thought. This shift in doctrine would direct his path for the rest of his life.

Machen became the professor of New Testament studies at Princeton Seminary, where he taught for 14 years. During his tenure, he was a strong proponent of conservative theology. As modernist theology began to make inroads on the university’s curriculum, Machen left Princeton to found the Westminster Theological Seminary. He taught at Westminster until his death in 1937.

The seven volumes in the J. Gresham Machen Collection not only give valuable insight into the twentieth century struggle for orthodoxy, they also provide solid theological training for today.

The Origin of Paul’s Religion was written as a direct response to scholars who believed the apostle Paul distorted the message of Jesus. To the modernist, the focus on the Resurrection instead of the ethical teachings of Jesus deviated from the central point of the Gospel. Machen’s response firmly asserted the historicity and power of Paul’s message.

American religious critic Harold Bloom said of Christianity and Liberalism“I have never seen a stronger case made for the argument that institutional Christianity must regard cultural liberalism an enemy of faith.”

The J. Gresham Machen Collection (7 vols.) is currently under development. If you act now, you can add Machen’s teaching to your library for nearly 70% off.

Get the Big Picture with the Zondervan Reference Collection

One of my favorite Bible teachers encouraged us to “study wide and then narrow our focus.” Understanding the big picture is key to good exegesis. It protects us from falling into the trap of interpreting verses before appreciating the context of the book, chapter, and pericope being studied.

With this principle in mind, I give you the Zondervan Reference Collection. These six volumes will help provide context  for your studies. With two dictionaries, an atlas, a Bible dictionary, a companion to Psalms, and a look at life during biblical times, you’ll have the big-picture foundation needed for better Bible study.

This collection includes essential helps for every Bible reader, springboarding beginners into better Bible study and providing rich tools that seasoned scholars will use again and again.

Pick up this collection while it’s on Pre-Pub and you’ll get these six volumes for less than $100—that’s a savings of nearly $50!

Leave us a comment and tell us about some of your favorite handbooks, dictionaries, or atlases!

Logos 4: A Greek Visual Filter for the English Student

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

Thank you for reading this blog. Now here’s a question. Did I just thank you, an individual reader, or did I thank you all as the collective group of readers? In other words, is the you singular or plural? You can’t answer decisively because you in English can be either. The language of the New Testament, Greek, makes a distinction between singular and plural pronouns, but not all English Bibles maintain that distinction. They use you for both singular and plural occurrences.

For example, Luke 22:31-32 is translated as follows in the NASB:

“Simon, Simon, behold, Satan has demanded permission to sift you like wheat; but I have prayed for you…”

Are these you’s singular or plural or both? Impossible to say for certain just by observing English. A Morphological Visual Filter, however, can help us easily answer the question.

  • Choose File | Visual Filter.
  • Select Morph as the filter type (1).
  • Select from the drop down lists All Morph Text, New Testament, All Resources, and Logos Greek Morphology (2).
  • Type the @ symbol in the Find box which alerts Logos that this is going to be a Morph search (3).
  • Select Pronoun from  the Part of Speech drop down list (4).
  • Select Singular from the Number column (5).
  • Click the arrow icon to save the morph code in the Find box (6).
  • Select from the Formatting list a style such as Box (7).
  • Type the @ symbol in the additional Find box that appears (8).
  • Select Pronoun from  the Part of Speech drop down list (9).
  • Select Plural from the Number column (10).
  • Click the arrow icon to save the morph code in the Find box (11).
  • Select from the Formatting list a style such as Double Box (12).







You have just instructed Logos to place a box around all singular pronouns and a double box around all plural pronouns in the New Testament of Bibles containing the Logos Greek Morphology. Now open an English Bible like the ESV, NASB, NKJV, or LEB to Luke 22:31The filtering on the underlying Greek morphology is shining through to the English surface text which certainly assists our study of any passage!


Do you see anything interesting in Luke 22:31-32?

If you enjoy this type of power usage of Logos then you’ll find Camp Logos 2 Live DVD Training very helpful. It’s packed full of instruction and application on how to use Logos original language features for the English student.

How can understanding the Greek meaning of a word help your study of the Bible in English? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos March Madness—It’s Game Time!

Logos March Madness starts today with our own Saturday Selection. All March long, we’ll be staging match-ups that follow the traditional NCAA March Madness schedule—with a Logos twist. This year, we’ve selected 64 of your favorite authors and placed them in brackets and mock conferences.  Each round you’ll have a chance to vote for your favorite author to advance. The more rounds an author wins, the greater discount you’ll get on a selection of his works. Discounts will start at 30%, increasing to 75% for the champion. Once an author has lost a round, a selection of his works will go on sale. These works will be listed on LogosMarchMadness.comalong with a coupon code for the discount. The schedule for Logos March Madness is as follows:

  • Selection Saturday —3/10
  • Round 1—3/10–16
  • Round 2—3/17–21
  • Sweet Sixteen—3/22–25
  • Elite 8—3/26–29
  • Final 4—3/30–31
  • Championship—4/2–3
  • Sale End—4/13

With nearly 600 resources available, this year’s Logos March Madness may be the best ever. Take a look at the field and start voting! Here are some tips for those of you trying to guess which resources will be on sale:

  1. All chosen resources are single author, single publisher
  2. No collections will be included, but individual works from collections may be.
  3. Most works have not been on Pre-Pub within the last year
  4. Most resources are not included in base packages.

Visit LogosMarchMadness.com today to view the brackets, and sign up for email alerts to see the most up-to-date information on each round of the sale.

At Long Last! Ceslas Spicq’s “The Epistle to the Hebrews” Will Be Translated

These are exciting times for Bible students, especially those who have studied the Epistle to the Hebrews. Logos is creating the first English translation of Ceslas Spicq’s two-volume commentary on Hebrews.

Originally published in French as L’ Épître aux Hébreux, Spicq’s commentary contains a wealth of citations and interaction with both primary sources as well as key commentators on Hebrews. But unless you read French (and own one of the rare copies), this commentary can’t help you. Now, however, you can pre-order your own copy—in English!

Who is Ceslas Spicq?

You’ve never heard of Ceslas Spicq (1901–1992)? That’s understandable, as most of his writings have not been translated into English. Spicq was a theology professor at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. He was also connected with the acclaimed École Biblique in Jerusalem. He authored a number of important commentaries, monographs, and a three-volume lexicon, Lexique théologique du Nouveau Testament, which was subsequently translated into English as the Theological Lexicon of the New Testament.

Why is this project important?

Spicq’s work is heavily referenced in almost every major commentary on Hebrews published after his!

The following chart highlights seven major commentaries and the number of times Spicq is referenced:

P. E. Hughes 152
F. F. Bruce (NICNT) 57
Harold Attridge (Hermeneia) 307
Craig Koester (AYBC) 269
Paul Ellingworth (NIGTC) 402
George Guthire (NIVAC) 32
Peter O’Brien (PNTC) 102
Total 1321

As you can see, scholarly interaction with Spicq is quite high. This chart doesn’t take into consideration the hundreds of times L’ Épître aux Hébreux has been mentioned in journal articles, monographs, and essays since Spicq’s commentary was published.

One of the more controversial sections features Spicq’s understanding of the relationship between Philo and the Hebrews author. In a section entitled “Le Philonisme de L’Épitre aux Hébreux (The Philonism of the Epistle to the Hebrews)”, Spicq spends 52 pages analyzing the vocabulary of Hebrews and the writings of Philo, paronomasia and metaphors they share, and an exegesis of select texts. While most modern scholars have put this thesis to rest; Ellingworth rightly notes, “it is not necessary . . . to reject as worthless or insignificant the linguistic and other evidence accumulated by Spicq” (Hebrews, 47).

Among Spicq’s greatest contributions are his detailed studies on the language and literary characteristics of Hebrews. This includes 27 pages of lexical and literary analysis. Spicq analyzes not only individual words, but also phrases unique to Hebrews.

Take it from the experts!

Still unsure about Ceslas Spicq? Here’s what leading scholars say about how important Ceslas Spicq’s commentary on Hebrews is:

“[Spicq’s] work on the Epistle to the Hebrews is a monument of dedicated piety and erudition.”—Philip E. Hughes, author of A Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews.

“Spicq’s commentary represented a major advance in the study of Hebrews. Exegetically thorough and theologically reflective, Spicq’s work influenced scholarly work on Hebrews in many languages for several decades. It remains an important resource for those who wish to mine the treasures of Hebrews.”—David Peterson, senior research fellow and lecturer in New Testament, Moore College

“I am delighted that someone is taking time to translate this classic work, which nearly all scholars who work in Hebrews references. Thank you for taking the time to provide an English translation for subsequent students to use in their study of the book.”—Herbert Bateman, professor of New Testament, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

Who will translate?

Once we have enough orders, we will confirm and announce who will be working on the translation.

Pre-order your copy now!

We are placing Spicq on Pre-Pub for only $39.95! That’s an almost unbelievable price, considering that the two-volume French edition is virtually impossible to find. I was fortunate to get a copy of the first volume, and it cost twice as much as both volumes on Pre-Pub.

Once we have enough to cover the cost for translation and production, the work begins. Order your copy today!