Own a $10,000 Library for $55 a Month

If you’ve been wanting to invest in Logos Bible Software but were waiting for a big discount, your patience has paid off.

All Logos 8 packages are 20% off for a limited time—all of them.

Here’s the quick rundown on why packages in Logos are such a good investment, and how you can own a library worth more than $10,000 in less than two years by paying just $55 a month.

Get the right library for you

Libraries aren’t one-size-fits-all. Choose from dozens of different libraries based on your needs.

For example:

  • Standard libraries
  • Academic libraries
  • Denomination-specific libraries

Standard libraries

These libraries are for people looking for a well-rounded library representing the best of evangelical and traditional Christian theology. You’ll find respected works such as the Pillar New Testament Commentary series (PNTC), The New American Commentary Series, and loads of Bible dictionaries, encyclopedias, devotionals, and sermon outlines.

Academic libraries

These packages are built with academics in mind. (Bonus: if you’re a student, faculty, or academic staff, you can save 30% or more on Logos 8 packages when you enroll in our Academic Discount Program.) These Academic packages contain more scholarly research helps and original language resources than our Standard packages.

Denomination-specific libraries

These packages are specially curated to major on resources in line with your preferred tradition. Denominations and traditions available include:

  • Baptist
  • Methodist & Wesleyan
  • Pentecostal & Charismatic
  • Reformed
  • And more

Take a look at what’s in each library to see which package is the best fit for your ministry.

Get tools for faster, deeper study

Whether you’re a student, Bible teacher, pastor, or missionary, time is of the essence.

One huge benefit of Logos is that all your books stay open right where you left them, so you never lose time getting back into your studies.

But that’s just the beginning. You can also:

  • Launch a Word Study with one click
  • Scroll resources in sync
  • Automatically cite your research
  • Analyze Scripture with interactive visual aids
  • Run searches on just about anything

Plus, Logos 8 comes with exciting new features like the Theology Guide, Workflows, Canvas, and updated Notes for even more streamlined study.

Learn more about the Bible study tools in Logos 8.

Get a giant library now for just $55 down

The packages you can get in Logos are an incredible value—in most cases, you’re saving around 90% when you buy a Logos package compared to building your library book by book.

Even so, we don’t want cost to keep you from getting tools that could have a massive impact on your ministry.

That’s why you can get payment plans on purchases over $100. You can get the leading Bible software for one short-term monthly payment, and then permanently own Logos in less than two years.

And now’s the time to buy, because all Logos 8 packages are 20% off this month.

So let’s say you’re considering Logos 8 Silver. Here’s what a payment plan would look like:

Regular price: $999.99
Price of library if books were bought separately: $10,898
Sale price: $799.99 (20% off this month!)
Due today: $55.14
Monthly payment: $54.99
Last payment date: 15 months from today

Logos payment plans allow you to progressively buy a package interest-free—it’s not a subscription. The only extra you pay is a $5/mo. administrative fee that covers overhead costs. Your payments are set for the length of time you choose, and they only continue if you decide to get more Logos products on payment plans.

Got more payment plan questions? Check out our FAQ, or call one of our resource experts at 800-875-6467.

How to choose the Logos payment plan option

Just follow these brief steps:

  1. Add your favorite Logos 8 package to your cart.
  2. Look at your cart. On the left side, you’ll see payment options.
  3. Choose the monthly payment that fits your budget best, and enter your phone number.
  4. Hit Next, then enter your payment info.
  5. That’s it! Once you’ve made your initial payment, your payments automatically deduct from your account each month. We’ll send a reminder a few days before the payment goes through.

Get Logos 8 today.

Are We Sincere about Biblical Authority?

In my previous post, I noted that the right context for interpreting the Bible accurately isn’t the history of Christianity in any of its creedal distillations or denominational forms. But I went even further—I said that the biblical context isn’t any modern world context, period. The right context for understanding the Bible is the context that produced the Bible. That seems simple, but experience has taught me that commitment to this patently obvious truth isn’t easy. [Read more…]

Pastor as Spiritual Fitness Trainer—Preparing People for Daily Discernment

By Kevin Vanhoozer

The church is the body of Christ, and its core—the community of disciples, the faith corps—enables its characteristic bodily movements: witnessing to the gospel, worshiping the God of the gospel, maintaining the health of the body, performing works of love.

To perform these movements, and to have the strength to work and keep on moving, the church needs to attend to its core. In a word, the church needs theological exercises: training in godliness.

Spiritual fitness training

I describe the pastor-theologian in various ways, but here the metaphor I want to develop is that of a spiritual fitness trainer. To make disciples is to train men and women to perform the characteristic bodily movements that enable the local church to perform its roles as an embassy of the kingdom of God, a Christ corps.

To make or train disciples fit for purpose involves certain kinds of exercise. I have in mind not simply bodily exertions for the sake of physical fitness, but all sorts of actions intended to improve a specific skill, like finger exercises for the piano, a military exercise, and exercises at the end of every textbook chapter. [One essential skill] is reading Scripture theologically in order to take every thought, and imagination, captive to Christ in order to walk the Way of Christ and become more Christlike.

Spiritual exercises

Seeing the Christian life as a series of exercises is, of course, nothing new. The most famous example is the sixteenth-century classic Spiritual Exercises by Ignatius of Loyola, a collection of prayers and meditations on what it means to live in relationship to God as a follower of Jesus.

The exercises are not bodily but interior: they are designed to strengthen not muscle but the heart, what the apostle Paul calls our “inner being” (Rom 7:22; Eph 3:16). They are recommendations for maintaining and improving the health of one’s soul: “We call Spiritual Exercises every way of preparing and disposing the soul to rid itself of all inordinate attachments, and . . . of seeking and finding the will of God in the disposition of our life.”1 The ultimate aim: to orient the heart to God, and to find God in all things.

Reality—the world we live in, the only world there is, the world created by God—always and everywhere presents everyone with a choice, an unavoidable “either-or”: “Choose this day whom you will serve” (Josh 24:15)

Discernment and decision

An important part of the exercises is learning to discern one’s own “spirit,” that is, the inner motivation for our actions. Hans Urs von Balthasar, a Roman Catholic theologian, believes that this emphasis on choice lies at the center of the Ignatian exercises: they’re all about helping persons to discern the heart of God, and the orientation of their own hearts, so that they choose God’s choice for them in joyful obedience.2

C.S. Lewis, though no Ignatian, had a similar concern for the centrality of “the choice” in the life of the disciple, as Joe Rigney explains: “Every moment of every day, you are confronted with a choice—either place God at the center of your life, or place something else there.”3

Reality—the world we live in, the only world there is, the world created by God—always and everywhere presents everyone with a choice, an unavoidable “either-or”: “Choose this day whom you will serve” (Josh 24:15), either the one true God (the Father of Jesus Christ) or some false god, be it money, sex, fame, power, or something else—their name is Legion.

Discipleship involves waking up to the realization that there is a choice, and we must stay awake to the lordship of Jesus Christ long enough to make the right one: to obey, and thereby to exercise, like Jesus, genuine freedom.4

***

Kevin J. Vanhoozer (PhD, Cambridge University) is Research Professor of Systematic Theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is the author of several books, including Faith Speaking Understanding: Performing the Drama of Doctrine and Biblical Authority after Babel: Retrieving the Solas in the Spirit of Mere Protestant Christianity, both Christianity Today Theology Books of the Year (2015, 2017). He is married and has two daughters.

This post is excerpted from Dr. Vanhoozer’s new book, Hearers and Doers: A Pastor’s Guide to Making Disciples through Scripture and Doctrine, now available from Lexham Press. See the table of contents and preview pages. This post’s title and headings are the addition of an editor.

Learning Logos: Enhancements to Notes in 8.4

Perhaps the greatest addition to Logos 8 is the new Notes tool. Understandably then, the makers of our software continue to tweak and enhance this incredible database. The recent release of 8.4 brought several such improvements, so in this blog, I’ll highlight a few. [Read more…]

Snag Commentaries for Up to 58% Off

For just a few more days, all volumes of the renowned NICOT/NICNT series are $29.99 or less. You can also snag the whole series for 43% off. [Read more…]

Kuyper’s Theological Commitments: An Introduction to Major Themes in His Works

By Craig Bartholomew

It may seem laughable in our present media-dominated context to imagine that a long, three-volume exposition of doctrine, written by a thoroughly orthodox Reformed theologian in another place and time, might hold vital clues for life today. Indeed, Common Grace was written as newspaper articles, published week by week over six years in [Kuyper’s] newspaper, De Heraut, and some perseverance is required to work through them. [Read more…]

26 Seminary-Level Courses to Listen to This Summer—All 25% Off

For many of us, summer means road trips, vacations, and a slower pace. It can also mean extra time to squeeze in some good theological training.

Right now every audio course from Logos Mobile Education is 25% off. Stock up with courses on topics you’re interested in, and let’s get started.

[Read more…]

Save 40% on the International Critical Commentary and More in May

If you love a good critical commentary, then have we got the May deals for you.

This month only, save 40% on top picks from Bloomsbury Publishing, including: [Read more…]

Do Proverbs 26:4 and 26:5 Contradict? On the Contrary . . . 

Answer not a fool according to his folly,
     lest you be like him yourself.
Answer a fool according to his folly,
     lest he be wise in his own eyes. [Read more…]

What Is the Proper Context for Interpreting the Bible?

The Four Evangelists, Jacob Jordaens, 1626–1630, commons.wikimedia.org

Anyone interested in Bible study, from the new believer to the biblical scholar, has heard (and maybe even said) that if you want to correctly interpret the Bible, you have to interpret it in context. I’m certainly not going to disagree. But I have a question: What does that mean? Put another way, just what context are we talking about? [Read more…]