Everyone Loves a Good Story

Platinum
Today’s guest post is by Sarah Wilson, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.

I love a good story. I was that kid hiding under the covers with a flashlight, catching up on Nancy Drew or the Chronicles of Narnia, long after lights out. With my love of reading and the written word, becoming an English major was an easy choice. In college, I studied plot devices, story arches, character development, point-of-view, literary theories, narrative structures, as well as things like grammar, punctuation, and citation systems. Studying the more technical aspects of novels, essays, and non-fiction pieces made my old beloved stories mean so much more—there are universal characteristics that make a compelling and appealing story.

The Bible is full of stories—the best stories because they are true. The stories of David, Moses, Simon Peter—heroes of the faith—inspire us, convict us, and provide context for our lives. Knowing the structure and literary background of the Bible is essential for general readers, professors, students, and anyone wanting to understand more about about the framework of the written Word of God.

As a book worm who geeks out over narrative ideas and theories, I’m really excited about David Jobling’s The Sense of Biblical Narrative (2 vols.), a Pre-Pub shipping tomorrow. In essay format, he goes into amazing detail on the narrative and theological structure of the Old Testament, covering literary theories such as myth, political and geographical ideologies, as well as providing invaluable exegetical and critical analysis of various Old Testament characters and passages, such as Jonathan, Ahab, and Numbers 11—12.

For those of you who want to get more out of your Bible study or sermon preparation, or if you love narrative ideas and background as much as I do, this incredibly helpful collection is a must-have. It’s in production right now—it will be going live the day before Thanksgiving. The Sense of Biblical Narrative (2 vols.) retails at $109.95, so pre-order today and get it for only $22.95!

Logos 4: Quickly Locate Pictures

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

If you’re like me, when you’re reading the Bible, sometimes you want to see pictures or images about the things in a passage. For example, imaging reading Acts 18.4 where Luke says Paul, "reasoned in the synagogue." We may wonder, what does a first century synagogue look like? Or if we’re in Ephesians 6.14, we may like to see an image of the breastplate Paul referenced. With Logos Bible Software 4 that image is just a click a way. For example:

  • Open an English Bible to Acts 18.4
  • Right click on the word synagogue
  • Select from the right menu Thing synagogue
  • Select from the left menu Biblical Things

The Biblical Things tool opens showing you pictures and images from your library, all related to synagogue. Keep these steps in mind when you comeacross most any object in the Bible: gazelle, cornerstone, lily, you name it.

Editing in High Definition

High Def

Today’s guest post is from John D. Barry, the Editor-in-Chief of Bible Study Magazine, the author of The Resurrected Servant in Isaiah, and the Book Publisher on titles like the High Definition Commentary: Philippians and the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary.

Editing a commentary is usually a chore. There are footnotes, end notes, and in-between notes—all information you want, but usually don’t want to edit. Editing Steve Runge’s High Definition Commentary: Philippians was different: it was life changing. Here’s why.

There Aren’t Notes—and That’s Good
Comprehensive commentaries, like volumes of the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary, need notes. You want as much information as possible to ensure that you’ll find what you’re looking for. But Runge’s Philippians commentary has a different purpose: it’s practical and teachable.

This quote from the commentary, which is about Philippians 1:28, will show you what I mean.

Opposition can cause us to second-guess our decisions. Should we have done this? Was it all a mistake? If I had done it differently would things have gone more smoothly? To address these issues, Paul reframes the idea of “striving for something” in the face of opposition. How do you deal with the doubts and second-guessing? By going back to what you know to be true. If God has really called … [the Philippians] to this ministry, and opposition is to be expected as a natural consequence of its message, then why doubt? They doubt because they’re relying on their own perspective. Paul addresses this once again by recasting things from God’s perspective.

Like a Story, You Will Want to Read This Commentary Cover to Cover
I read this commentary cover to cover. Yes, that’s my job. But once you download it, you will want to do the same. Until now, I’ve never read a commentary with a narrative arc. This commentary has a beginning, middle and end. Like the book of Philippians, this commentary has plot twists, shocking moments, and a climax.

After I read this commentary, I wanted to change parts of my life. I wanted to follow Jesus more closely, pray more intently, and love more fully. Steve has an incredible way of blending a linguist’s understanding of the Bible with passion and application. As I told Steve, “The church needs this commentary series.”

Graphics Make This Commentary High Def
Prose can only get you so far. Some words are just better as images. This is the first commentary I’ve ever seen with graphics. Shiloh Hubbard, the Visual Designer on this project, did an amazing job creating the accompanying slides that illustrate Steve’s commentary. If you buy the commentary, you’ll get 2 -3 slides for each section of Scripture. We’re making the Bible memorable while also making your job easy: you can use these slides for teaching.

This particular slide from the commentary stuck in my mind. It called me back to rejoicing in my prayers—a reminder that we all need. It also prompted me to request the same from the church plant I’m part of.

rejoice.jpg

Here’s Steve’s description of the slide—his descriptions come with the commentary too.

Rejoicing as a Safeguard: Paul begins the chapter by “again” commanding the Philippians to rejoice. It is one of the most critical things they can do to guard their hearts against discouragement. It’s not just a good idea, it is a safeguard specifically designed by God for this purpose. How does it work? If I am choosing to rejoice in the Lord over my circumstances or situation, it will be nearly impossible to grumble and complain about the same thing. It is an either/or proposition. A natural consequence of truly rejoicing in the Lord about something is the inability to complain about it. You cannot grumble and rejoice about the same thing at the same time. If you’re grumbling, you’re not rejoicing.

Pre-order Steve Runge’s High Definition Commentary: Philippians now. And then pre-order the Romans volume.

Logos Bible Software BlackBerry Launcher for Biblia.com

Biblia.comBlackBerry users, there is now an easier way to access Biblia.com! Now you can use the free Bible study tools or access many resources from your Logos 4 base package quickly and effeciently. We have created a Biblia.com launcher which utilizes our distinguishable Logos icon—giving you one-click access to Bible study on your BlackBerry. Take a moment to add the launcher icon to your home screen now.

Using your BlackBerry’s web browser, here’s what you’ll need to do:

[Read more...]

Last Chance: Göttingen Septuagint Shipping Soon!

Göttingen Septuagint

Last year we posted the Göttingen Septuagint (65 vols.) on Pre-Pub—the largest Septuagint project ever undertaken. Now, we’re just a week away from shipping the text and the apparatus, which gives you one final chance to get this massive Septuagint at a phenomenal price.

The version that ships next week will include the text and the apparatus. We are still completing the morphology, and it will be released in stages during the next few months. We know that many of our users will benefit from having the text and apparatus next week, even if the morphology isn’t ready yet. Many Septuagint scholars have been waiting for the Logos edition of the text and the apparatus, and we didn’t want to wait until the morphology was complete to begin releasing what’s available now.

The good news is that because Logos 4 updates automatically, you’ll get the morphology the moment it’s completed. There’s nothing extra you need to do to get it.

About the Göttingen Septuagint

The Göttingen Septuagint represents the largest Septuagint project ever undertaken. Published between 1931 and 2006, the 24-volume Göttingen Septuagint contains the most authoritative critical apparatus of the Greek Old Testament ever assembled.

Combining textual evidence from countless manuscripts and ancient sources—including Philo, Josephus, and the Church Fathers—the Göttingen Septuagint is the most detailed and elaborate critical edition of the Septuagint ever published.

The Göttingen Septuagint is the fruit of seven decades of research and publication work. Alfred Rahlfs began the project in the 1920s, and published the volumes on Genesis and Psalms before his death in 1935. William Kappler worked on the Maccabeus volumes before his death in 1944, and Robert Hanhart finished the volume on II Maccabeus and completed III Maccabeus in 1960. Between 1939 and 1957, Joseph Ziegler labored on the books of the prophets, as well as Ieremias-Baruch-Threni-Epistula Ieremiae, Sapientia Salomonis, and Ecclesiasticus.

Last Chance!

Remember, when the Göttingen Septuagint ships in a few days, the Pre-Pub price will jump, so you still have a few more days to pre-order at the current price.

To give you an idea of how good a deal this is, remember that the print version would set you back over $3,000.00. Other digital editions cost $400.00 for just the Pentateuch. That makes pre-ordering the entire Göttingen Septuagint for $349.95 from Logos the right choice. That’s an amazing deal on 65 resources in 24 volumes!

What are you waiting for? Place your pre-order today before time runs out!

You should follow us on Twitter here.

Catena Aurea Is Shipping Soon!

Middle Ages
Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager on the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

We’ve discussed the Catena Aurea on the blog before, but before the special Pre-Pub price expires, I wanted to share how excited I am about its completion.

For those unfamiliar with it, the Catena Aurea is a commentary on the Gospels made up of quotations from Church Fathers and other commentators compiled by Thomas Aquinas. The English translation was edited by yet another great theological mind, John Henry Newman. An earlier post from Rosie Perera explains very well how great a resource this is, but I want to explain the benefits of the Logos edition in particular.

Aside from the basic advantages of a Logos edition—like higher accuracy in the capture of the text—there are a few specific things that we’ve done to make the Catena Aurea more usable than ever.

For one thing, print editions of the Catena Aurea have a very compact format, with patristic quotations strung together in long paragraphs and their sources only indicated by brief abbreviations and marginal notes.

In the Logos edition, we’ve added spacing to make the quotations easier to see. We’ve expanded, standardized (and, where necessary, disambiguated) the abbreviations for Church Fathers names to allow for easy identification of the source and consistent searching across the volumes. We’ve added pop-ups giving information from the front matter identifying who an author is and when he wrote, and we’ve moved marginal references into more precise locations in the body text.

Most of all, we’ve linked around 3,000 patristic references that are found in the Early Church Fathers, so that, in combination with that set (in either the Protestant or Catholic editions), you can instantly explore the broader context of many of the quotes. This makes it easy to use the Catena as a starting point for deeper study of the Church Fathers and, since the quotes in the Catena are often very brief and are occasionally condensed from longer passages, it can sometimes be particularly important for establishing the complete thought of the author.

With linking of Bible references, indexing by Bible verse, and integration as a commentary into your Passage Guide, this makes the Logos edition more powerful and easy to use than anything else available.

Even at full price of $139.99, the Logos edition of the Catena Aurea is a bargain, when you consider that you’re getting a richer, more powerful resource than comparably priced print sets, but until November 30, you can get it at the special Pre-Pub price. Don’t miss out!

Logos 4: Auto Bookmarks

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

After reading a while in your Bibles and books you’ll begin to notice little gray hash marks in the vertical scroll bar of the resources. These marks are called Auto Bookmarks.

Imagine as you read print books that you “dog ear” each page you read. That’s what these gray marks are. They indicate every place you’ve been in a particular Bible or book. Rest your cursor on an auto bookmark and you’ll see a preview of the text on the page. Click the mark to jump to that location.

If, however, you’d rather not see the auto bookmarks you can easily hide them:

  • Choose Tools | Program Settings
  • Set Show Auto and Favorite Bookmarks to No

If you have a change of heart, just return to Program Settings and reset the option to Yes.

47 New Zondervan Books on Pre-Pub!

Zondervan Bible Reference Bundle 2 (47 vols.)

Earlier this year, we released 87 books published by Zondervan, and the response was amazing! Thousands of our users got on board and got dozens of top-notch books at incredible prices.

Since then, we’ve received a flood of new suggestions for Zondervan titles. Zondervan consistently publishes some of the most important reference material in the fields of biblical and theological studies, so it’s no wonder our users have been asking for more.

Today, we’re announcing the continuation of our partnership with Zondervan to make 47 more books available in Logos Bible Software. We are thrilled that Zondervan has decided to continue to make their books available in our format.

We have just received permission from Zondervan to combine all 47 books into one giant collection and offer it at a substantial discount. The Zondervan Bible Reference Bundle 2 (47 Vols.) includes several bestselling titles and new releases, including An Introduction to the New Testament, by D. A. Carson and Douglas J. Moo, and Introduction to the Old Testament, by Tremper Longman III and Raymond B. Dillard, plus a lot more.

The Zondervan Bible Reference Bundle 2 (47 Vols.) is discounted on Pre-Pub right now at more than 30% off Zondervan’s retail prices. So if you’ve had your eye on a few of these titles, you’ll want to lock in your order now at the lowest price.

This 30% off deal is only an introductory Pre-Pub price. It will be going up soon, so you need to place your order right away to get the lowest price.

The Zondervan Bible Reference Bundle 2 (47 Vols.) contains all the new Zondervan books from the following collections:

Remember, this bundle will only move forward with your support. If you have been waiting for the chance to add more Zondervan titles to your library, we urge you to place your pre-order today.

Get it all at the best price while you still can: Zondervan Bible Reference Bundle 2 (47 Vols.).

And check out the complete list of Zondervan titles available from Logos Bible Software!

You should follow us on Twitter here.

Training Resources from Morris Proctor

Morris

If you are a regular reader of the Logos blog you know that Monday is typically set aside for Morris Proctor’s training posts. Morris Proctor is the certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. His blog posts are a regular feature, giving insight into getting the most out of Logos 4.

If you look over the last couple of weeks you will find great training tips like:

This is just the beginning of the training that is made available weekly at blog.Logos.com.

In addition to these weekly tips, Morris also leads Camp Logos training seminars around the country. These two-day training sessions in using Logos 4 for Bible study have been a valuable resource for equipping even the most seasoned Logos 4 users. Logos forum MVP, Thomas Black, shared with Logos blog readers just how much he got out of the Camp Logos seminar.

Check the schedule for a listing of upcoming Camp Logos events near you, or join us for “National Camp Logos,” held in Bellingham, Washington, each summer. Next year’s National Camp Logos will be held June 9-10, 2011. If you can make it, you can also enjoy a tour of Logos!

Camp Logos is not the only way to receive training in Logos 4. Morris Proctor also has a number of great resources available from Logos Bible Software.

Make sure you are getting the most out of Logos 4 with these valuable training tools!

Has Christianity Failed You on FreeBookPreview.com

Ravi Zacharias

Zondervan and FreeBookPreview.com is offering a free opportunity to examine Ravi Zacharias’ Has Christianity Failed You. During the week of November 7–11, you can preview Has Christianity Failed You in its entirety on the free Logos Bible Software iPhone/iPad app.

Ravi Zacharias is known for tackling difficult issues with intellectual vigor and genuine sensitivity. In Has Christianity Failed You, Zacharias compassionately wrestles with many of the questions that cause believers to nurse silent doubts or walk away from the Church altogether. The odds are that if you are not struggling with your own crises of faith—you know someone who is!

Head over to FreeBookPreview.com and get instructions on how to get the free preview. Or simply download the free app and enjoy your preview.