National Camp Logos in Bellingham, WA—June 21–22

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

mp|seminars TipsIt’s time for the highlight of our year: National Camp Logos, which will take place June 21–22. As it is every year, Camp Logos will be hosted in Bellingham, Washington, home to Logos Bible Software.

As a software owner, you know how incredibly powerful Logos is. If, however, you’re like most Logos users, you’re only taking advantage of a fraction of its capabilities. Let us help you unleash the power of Logos at this two-day hands-on training seminar.

You will learn to:

  • Customize Bible study guides for your method of study
  • Locate just the information you need with pinpoint searching
  • Organize your research in detailed note files
  • Create information-filled study folders ready for future use
  • And much, much more

Included in National Camp Logos:

  • Extended training sessions
  • Question-and-answer sessions with Logos leadership
  • Previews of upcoming Logos products
  • Tour of the ever-expanding Logos headquarters
  • Catered meals

To learn more or register for National Camp Logos, please click here.

Free Book of the Month: H. A. Ironside’s The Four Hundred Silent Years

“Harry Ironside is a great example of a preacher full of God’s Word.”—R. Kent Hughes

H. A. Ironside’s The Four Hundred Silent Years  is June’s Free Book of the Month!

Henry “Harry” Allen Ironside was one of the twentieth century’s greatest preachers. He held honorary degrees from Wheaton College and Bob Jones University and was frequently invited to lecture at Dallas Theological Seminary.

After serving as a Salvation Army officer for a brief period, Ironside joined the Plymouth Brethren and started what would become a highly successful itinerant ministry of preaching and teaching. He served as pastor at Moody Memorial Church from 1930 to 1948, preaching more than 7,000 sermons during his lifetime.

In The Four Hundred Silent Years, Ironside draws from sources like C. M. Grant’s Between the Testaments and the Apocrypha to piece together the timeline between the prophet Malachi and the Gospel of Matthew.

You can get Ironside’s book free throughout the end of June, and when you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the 65-volume Works of H. A. Ironside collection.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download your free book and enter the giveaway!

Using Greek Apocryphal Gospels in your Study (Part 2)

Greek Apocryphal Gospels

As the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments and Agrapha project is now in the “Under Development” stage of the pre-pub process, and since I’ve done some work on it, I thought it would be fun to write about some of the material.

Most folks aren’t familiar with this stuff, but it is very interesting and can even be helpful when looking at the events recorded in the New Testament.

In Part 1 of this two-part post, we talked about P.Vindob. 2325, an apocryphal fragment which has similarities with the gospel accounts of Jesus predicting Peter’s betrayal (Mt 26:30–35; Mk 14:26–30) .

There are also fragments of things that expand or add to canonical material, like P.Berol. 11710, two small fragments dating back to the sixth century that share a short interaction between Nathanael and Jesus, which perhaps expands a bit on Jn 1:47–51. One snippet from those small fragments: “The Rabbi also said, ‘Nathanael, walk in the sun.’ Nathanael answered him and said, ‘Rabbi Lord, you are the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.'”

These additions should not be considered canonical. But the influence of the Johannine themes (the light/darkness motif via “walk in the sun”; Nathanael calling Jesus “the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world,” see Jn 1:29) are notable. For whatever reason, the author of this expansion thought these things were important enough to frame in this manner.

Some fragments give accounts of things altogether unknown. P.Oxy 840, dated to the fourth century, tells the story of a Pharisee and high priest (named Levi?) talking with Jesus and his disciples in the temple complex about purity. This one even has Jesus giving this Levi a “woe” statement:

“Woe to you, blind ones who do not see. You have washed in these running waters in which dogs and pigs have been cast night and day, and have cleansed the outsides of your skin, which also the prostitutes and the flute-girls anoint and wash and scrub and beautify for the lust of men.”

Yikes! There are elements that the gospels use in railing against Pharisees (a “woe” statement, talking about cleansing the outside and neglecting the inside, see Mt 23:25-37) but the substance is altogether unknown outside of this fragment. We can see, perhaps, how a segment of early Christianity continued portray the Pharisees in a derogatory manner.

Does this stuff interest you at all? Then you should check out the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments and Agrapha. It will include the Greek of these fragments and other documents. The fragmentary papyri and agrapha will also have translations. The larger apocryphal gospels will have newly-written introductions along with bibliographies. Each fragment will also have a short introduction; the agrapha will probably have an introduction for each source of agrapha. These introductions will also discuss parallels/relationships with the New Testament.

All of these things add to the understanding we have of how scripture was used and even how it was mis-used in the early days of the development of Christianity. We learn more about what sorts of stories they told, what sorts of sermons they preached, and how they tried to understand the gospel and tell it to others. By understanding even a little more about the cultural milieu of those early days of the development of Christianity, we end up with more insight to the gospel itself and how it was received by those who heard it.

Top 5: Logos Talk’s Most Popular Posts for May

Logos Talk brings you the most important news about Logos products, company culture, and promotions. In case you missed them, here are the top 5 posts for May 2012.

1. 5 Reasons You Need a DMin from Knox

Logos has teamed up with Knox Theological Seminary to create an amazing DMin program. If you’ve ever mulled over pursuing a doctorate in ministry, you owe it to yourself to check out the new DMin in Preaching and Teaching. This post will give you a strong overview of the program.

2. Kick Off Summer with These Special Deals

Many people took advantage of the special deals Logos offered over the Memorial Day weekend. Due to some technical difficulties with our email system, some people missed out on this sale. We’ve decided to continue this sale through June 1. So if you missed the sale over the weekend, there is still some time to get in on these bargains.

Never miss out on a sale again. Subscribe to the Logos Talk RSS feed today!

3. Exclusive Deals from Christian Companies—Sign Up Now!

Want to receive coupons and deals from your favorite Christian companies through Logos? This post explains the new partnership we’re working out with our best partners. As an added bonus, you can sign up to receive these exclusive emails right in the blog post.

4. Logos High 5: What’s Your Favorite Bible Translation?

We asked our Facebook fans for their favorite Bible translations, then compiled those favorites into a top 5 poll. We got a lot of suggestions for translations that shouldn’t have been left off the list (including the Lexham English Bible). Don’t let your favorite translation go unrecognized—if you haven’t had a chance to vote in our poll, do so now! We’ll be doing a follow-up post next week.

Make sure to tell us about the translation that shouldn’t have been left out!

5. The Expositor’s Bible Commentary Just Got Better!

Zondervan has updated the classic Expositor’s Bible Commentary with 60% more content! Check out this post to see why the Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Revised Edition (13 vols.) is perfect for you.

How to Pick the Perfect Graduation Gift for Your Grad

Run a Google search for “graduation gift ideas” and you’ll find all kinds of stuff: T-shirts, jewelry, picture frames, personalized candy tins—plenty of neat trinkets.

Unfortunately for grads that plan to enter vocational ministry, these have nothing to do with their future in Bible college, seminary, preaching, or teaching. But you can give them something that will set them up for lifelong ministry! We’ve put together four graduation gift ideas for the grad who wants the best in Bible study tools.

Then we reduced the prices on this list to make them more appealing.

1. A Logos Base Package

Your grad will be able to dig deeper into the Word with Logos 4, the world’s most advanced Bible study tools. Check out all Logos will empower your grad to do in future studies and ministry.

A Logos base package gives grads the tools they need to pursue their calling.

  • They’ll build better sermons, faster.
  • They’ll disciple and counsel their followers well.
  • They’ll find quick answers to tough questions.
  • They’ll take massive theological libraries anywhere with our apps.

2. The D. A. Carson “Love of God” Collection

(15% off through June 14 with coupon code Grad01)

This 900+ page collection deals with questions about God’s love—something that’s often distorted in today’s popular culture—by bringing together three books by noted evangelical scholar Donald A. (D. A.) Carson. The Difficult Doctrine of the Love of God looks at God’s love from a biblical perspective and really digs into this vitally important doctrine. For the Love of God volumes 1 and 2 each offer systematic 365-day plans that take readers through the New Testament and Psalms twice and the rest of the Old Testament once using the M’Cheyne Bible-reading schedule.

3. The Complete Works of Francis A. Schaeffer (5 vols.)

(50% off through June 14 with coupon code Grad02)

Francis Schaeffer deeply affected a generation of readers; this is the definitive edition of his books. This set includes 22 titles divided into five areas of study: Christian views on philosophy and culture, the Bible’s truth, spirituality, the church, and the West.

4. Don’t Waste Your Life

(15% off through June 14 coupon code Grad03)

Most people slip by in life without a passion for God, living for comfort and pleasure. In this book, John Piper warns readers not to get caught up in a life that counts for nothing.
These deals end soon, so don’t wait—give your grad the world’s best Bible software today and set them up for future ministry! Check out all these deals and more graduation gift ideas at our graduation gifts page .

Moving On to Doctorate Studies?

If you and/or your grad are looking to enhance your ministry and get that “Dr.,” now’s the time to check out the new Doctor of Ministry in Preaching and Teaching from Logos and Knox Theological Seminary. If you apply by June 1, Logos will fly you to your first onsite class free!

All these deals end soon, so don’t wait—give your grad the world’s best Bible software today and set them up for future ministry! Check out all these deals and more graduation gift ideas at our graduation gifts page.

Kick Off Summer with These Special Deals

UPDATE: Get Memorial Day deals now through June 1!

We had some technical difficulties with our email system last weekend, so we’re extending the Memorial Day sale so everyone can get in on the opportunity to save big! 

Summer is nearly a month away. But for many, Memorial Day weekend means setting up lawn furniture, dusting off the barbecue, and pulling out the summer clothes.

And that means it’s time to get ready for summer reading, studying, and library building. Logos is here to help—with special Memorial Day weekend prices on some of our most popular products!

Super Savings on Books and Collections!

These special offers are only available

Nelson Bible Reference Bundle (200 vols.)

Retail: $6,000  Logos Price: $899.95

Pay only $599.95 with the coupon code: MEM01


John MacArthur Bundle (98 vols.)

Retail: $740.84  Logos Price: $349.95

Pay only $319.95 with the coupon code: MEM05

Lenski’s Commentary on the New Testament(LCNT) (12 vols.)

Retail: $595  Logos Price: $299.95

Pay only $199.95 with the coupon code: MEM06


Christian Origins and the Question of God Series (3 vols.)

Retail: $119.90  Logos Price: $99.95

Pay only $89.95 with the coupon code: MEM02

Theological Lexicon of the New Testament (3 vols.)

Retail: $149.95  Logos Price: $89.95

Pay only $59.95 with the coupon code: MEM04

Christian Theology, 2nd ed. by Millard Erickson

Retail: $49.99  Logos Price: $29.99

Pay only $22.95 with the coupon code: MEM03

Don’t Miss This Free Resource!

Get Thomas Cranmer and the English Reformation absolutely FREE!

Pick up Albert Frederick Pollard’s classic biography of this important English Reformer (valued at $25.00FREE when you use coupon code MEM07.

Multiple items with more than one coupon code will need to be purchased separately; we apologize for any inconvenience. These coupon codes are only available for a limited time, so take advantage of these sales by midnight, June 1 (PST).

Want a more personal experience? Our sales team will be open Monday–Friday, 6 am to 5 pm (PST)! Call us at 1-800-875-6467.

Only 3 Days Left to Get May’s Free Book of the Month!

A. W. Pink’s The Godhood of God has been May’s Free Book of the Month, but the month is nearly over. If you haven’t downloaded this freebie, time’s running out!

What’s the Godhood of God? Pink explains this title as follows:

 “The Godhood of God! What is meant by the expression? This: the omnipotency of God, the absolute sovereignty of God. When we speak of the Godhood of God we affirm that God is God. We affirm that God is something more than an empty title: that God is something more than a mere figure-head: that God is something more than a far-distant Spectator, looking helplessly on at the suffering which sin has wrought. When we speak of the Godhood of God we affirm that He is ‘King of kings and Lord of lords.’ “

Biographer Iain H. Murrary says, “The widespread circulation of [Pink’s] writings after his death made him one of the most influential evangelical authors in the second half of the twentieth century.”

When you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the 40-volume A. W. Pink Collection! Download the free book and enter to win the collection before June 1!

Logos 4: A Shortcut to the Harmony of the Gospels

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips Some events in the Bible are recorded in more than one place. For example, the Ten Commandments appear in both Exodus and Deuteronomy. Qualifications for church leadership are listed in both1 Timothy and Titus. Passages in the Bible describing the same event are called parallel passages and a book containing parallel passages is called a harmony.

Perhaps the most popular harmony is a harmony of the Gospels, displaying in parallel columns the Gospels writers’ accounts of the same historical event. To use this resource in print we would normally go to the table of contents and look up an episode in the life of Christ such as his temptations from Satan. The table of contents would direct us to Matthew’s, Mark’s and Luke’s descriptions of the incident.

As you can see, there’s a lot of page-turning involved in using a harmony in print. Logos, however, locates the same information with just one mouse click!

  • Type A Harmony of the Gospels in the Command box (1)
  • Drag the resource from the drop-down list that appears under the Command box to the Shortcuts bar (2)
  • Notice that Logos creates a shortcut icon to open A.T. Robertson’s A Harmony of the Gospels (all Logos base collections except the Christian Home Library contain this book) (3)
  • Open a Bible to a passage in the gospels such as Luke 4.1 (4)
  • Click the new shortcut icon to instantly open A Harmony of the Gospels right to the page displaying Matthew’s, Mark’s, and Luke’s accounts of the three temptations of Jesus!! (5)

To see the other harmonies you own:

  • Open the Library
  • Type this text into Library’s Find box: type:harmony
  • Drag from the Library to the Shortcuts bar harmonies that cover other parts of the Bible such as Synopsis of the Old Testament and Pastoral Epistles.

When you’re reading in the Old Testament or the pastoral letters, click the appropriate icon to open the resource to the page showing parallel passages!

If you like this explanation of a harmony, then you’ll enjoy the new training tool, Introduction to Bible Study with Logos Bible Software, in which I describe numerous Bible study resources and explain how to use them in Logos.

Get Free Airfare to Your First Class—Just 4 Days Left!

Big things are happening with the remarkable new  doctor of ministry from Knox Theological Seminary and Logos Bible Software. In a nutshell, we’ve teamed up to offer a revolutionary new theology degree in preaching and teaching that’s completely rooted in Logos 4—and that even includes your own Portfolio library  in the cost. That’s a pretty big deal.

But the deal gets sweeter.

Logos will fly you to your first onsite class for free if you apply before May 30*!

Get Your Doctorate Using Logos

The Knox DMin in Preaching and Teaching is the first DMin out there to combine first-rate theology with first-class technology. You’ve got plenty of reasons to get the Knox DMin, including the amazing professors (like Drs. Bruce Waltke and Haddon Robinson), the fantastic price and payment plan (just $18,000 over three years), and the Logos 4: Portfolio Edition—our largest base package—lumped into the cost! The entire program is built around Logos Bible Software, so you’ll graduate with a powerful theological library and the skills to use it to build life-changing sermons, curricula, Bible studies, and more.

Fly to Your First Class Free!

If you’re about to start earning your “Dr.,” the last thing you need on your mind is securing a plane ticket. So let Logos take care of it! If you apply to the DMin program before May 30*, your airfare to your first class is free. The deadline for this opportunity is only days away, so apply now—before it’s too late.

*Update: 

We are extending this exciting offer through Friday, June 1! This gives you two more days to apply to for the Knox DMin program and receive free airfare for your first class. What are you waiting for? Apply now!

 

Using Greek Apocryphal Gospels in Your Study (Part 1)

Greek Apocryphal Gospels

Since the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments and Agrapha project made it to the “Under Development” stage of the Pre-Pub process, I’ve been spending part of my time working on it.

Specifically, I’ve been working on getting transcriptions of all of the fragmentary stuff and the agrapha together. It’s been fun, and I’ve been able to acquaint myself with these valuable fragments at a deeper level.

[Short aside: As I’ve worked on the transcriptions, I also translated them because I found it helpful for reference. So the resource will also include translations of the fragments and agrapha, which is new — not even mentioned on the Pre-Pub page yet!]

But, really, can this stuff be helpful and useful as you study the Bible? I think it can be, and that’s one reason why I wanted so much to start this project.

Let’s take a small fragment, P.Vindob. 2325 (aka “The Fayûm Fragment”) as an example.

This little guy, probably part of a larger scroll, was located in Vienna in 1885 among some papyri that Archduke Rainier had ferreted away. It probably dates to the early/middle third century (so, 200–250).

As you read it, it will sound very familiar. But the wording itself is different from other synoptic accounts of the same event. Here’s my provisional translation:

… and he brought out, as he said, that “In this night you will all fall away, as it is written: ‘I will strike the shepherd and the sheep will be scattered.'” Peter said, “Even if everyone else does, I will not.” Jesus said, “Before the rooster crows twice, today you will deny me three times.”

Sound familiar? Yup. Sounds like the same thing which is mentioned in Mt. 26:30–35; Mk. 14:26–30; see also Lk. 22:34 and Jn. 13:38. But, at the same time, it is a bit different. Jesus isn’t explicitly referred to at the beginning, at least in the portion of the text we have. It makes you wonder what happened before this event. The quote of Zech 13:7 is introduced slightly differently ([κατα] το γραφεν vs. γεγραπται γαρ), but the substance of the quote is pretty much the same. It is missing Mk 14:28/Mt 26:32, the part about the disciples meeting in Galilee after Jesus is raised. The dialogue between Peter and Jesus is a bit shorter and simpler. And the text agrees with the Markan reading, that the rooster will crow twice (Mt./Lk. just say “crow”), but says it will be “today” without Mark’s further “this night” clarification.

There are enough differences between the Greek of P.Vindob. 2325 and Mark 14:26–30 that we can pretty safely assume P.Vindob. 2325 is not directly related to the Gospel of Mark. A minority view is that it could be from the Gospel of Peter, but that relies on shaky ground (reading “Peter said” as “I, Peter, said” through an alternate reconstruction).

What P.Vindob. 2325 does tell is us that people were telling the story of Christ’s crucifixion (and resurrection) in all sorts of ways and that, at least in this instance, it sounds pretty much like what we’re familiar with. One common thought today is that P.Vindob. 2325 was a re-working and abridgment of the synoptic accounts.

There are all sorts of fragments like this, witnessing some portion found in the gospels—but not in completely the same way. While definitely not canonical, they are very interesting and enlightening.

There are also fragments that expand upon canonical material and fragments that give us completely new material. They  help us understand more about the sorts of tales and influences that were floating about in the early, early church. We’ll talk about these sorts of fragments next week!