What’s the Purpose of the Gospel?

Pastorum 2013 is quickly approaching, and we’re excited to have speakers such as Michael Goheen, Ed Stetzer, Mark Futato, and others.

At Pastorum 2012, some of the top internationally recognized scholars gathered to dig deeper into God’s Word. Here’s Pastorum 2012 speaker Scot McKnight on the purpose of the Gospel and evangelism:

 

Join Mark Glanville and Lynn Cohick at Pastorum 2013 and unpack the purpose of the Gospel.

“The biblical story is the story of God’s recovering his purposes for creation through the death and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ, and calling people to live as signs to Christ’s restorative reign. How to think of this, how to preach this, how to lead for this, how to gossip this in our churches . . . . these are the questions of Pastorum.”

—Mark Glanville

“I would like to encourage pastors and leaders in reading Scripture well. At Pastorum we will focus on the reality of Jesus as a first-century individual and Jew. We will make connections between our twenty-first century world and the biblical world. We will learn the importance of hermeneutics in our study practices.”

Lynn Cohick

Register now—we’ll see you at Pastorum!

Easily Manage Your Devices and Downloads

iPhoneWith Logos 5, you can access most of your library on multiple devices. Now, it’s easier than ever to manage your devices and downloads.

Managing Your Devices

When you download any free app from Logos (Logos Bible Software, Faithlife Study Bible, or Vyrso) on your iOS or Android device, and sign in with your Logos.com account, your device will instantly be logged on your account page. Under the heading “Mobile Devices,” you’ll see all your devices and downloaded apps.

Device MgmtAbove, you can see the apps I have on my Sony tablet and Motorola phone. Let’s say I have one tablet for home and one for work, and I get them confused. When I hover over either of the devices, I’m given the option to edit their names to make it easier to remember which is which.

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If I were to lose, break, or sell either of these items, I could simply hover over the device and choose to “Remove.”

Managing Your Downloads

I like to keep a couple books downloaded to read when I’m lounging around or have some time to kill. Managing those downloads is a cinch. Here are three ways you can manage your downloads:

1. Download books directly from the device

Click the information icon (i) to the right of any book in your library and you’ll get a pop-up with a button to download the resource to your device (iOS or Android).

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2. Download books from your order page

When you purchase a single volume, you’ll be taken to the order summary page. If you have devices on file and want to download your new book, you can do so here.

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Even if it’s a book you purchased a while ago, you can go to your order page, scroll down to the order history, click the order number, and choose where to download it.

3. Download books from Logos 5

My favorite way to manage my downloads is directly in Logos 5. Click on the Library icon, right-click on the bar to choose the information displayed, and check “Devices.” Once you choose for your library to display devices, you can see the books already downloaded.

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If there’s a particular item in your Logos 5 library you want to download, open the book, and then click the information icon.

Information

Now you can choose the device and app(s) where you want to download your book.

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We’re serious about Bible study. Not only do we want to give you the best tools available, we want to make managing those tools as easy as possible.

Do you have any suggestions that we could implement to make our tools easier to use? Leave us a comment; we’d love to hear them!

See It All: from Genesis to Our Time

Logos’ Timeline maps out every major event and time period in biblical and church history—from Adam to our time. You’ll see how all of the Bible’s people, places, and things interconnect with events that span millennia.

Both events in your preferred Bible and dates in select Logos resources link to the Timeline, so you can get the big picture fast.

Learn more about Logos’ Timeline, and be sure to check out all of Logos 5’s new features.

Discover connections you never knew existed—get Logos 5 today.

Logos 5: Active Layout

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

For years, I’ve had the privilege of training people around the world how to get the most out of Logos Bible Software. At almost every seminar, I’m asked this question:

Is there an easy way to see which layout is currently open on the Logos desktop?

I’ve always had to answer no—until now. The recently released Logos 5.0b contains a feature known as Active Layout. Among other things, the Active Layout places layout names to the right of Logos Bible Software on the application title bar.

Try this:

  • Arrange your Logos desktop any way you like
  • Choose the Layouts menu
  • Click Save as named layout on the NOW snapshot (this is also a new 5.0b feature) (A)

  • Type a name in the text box
  • Press the Enter key to save the name
  • Close the Layouts menu
  • Close all panels on the desktop
  • Choose the Layouts menu
  • Click the name of your recently saved layout to load it (B)

  • Notice the name of your layout to the right of Logos Bible Software on the application title bar! (C)

 

If you like this Logos 5 feature, make sure to check out the What’s New in Logos 5 training DVD now on Pre-Pub.

 

Get Updates on Products in the Anglican Tradition

Book of Common PrayerLogos is adding resources that focus specifically on the Anglican/Episcopalian tradition. To that end, Logos has made me the Anglican product manager and tasked me with identifying important works from the Anglican/Episcopalian tradition that we can add to our existing Anglican products. As someone who just completed a thesis on early nineteenth-century Anglicanism (particularly the Oxford or Tractarian Movement), I am aware of many products we can add and very enthusiastic about the pairing of Anglican products with Logos’ powerful platform.

Often considered the Via Media (middle way), Anglicanism has historically drawn on resources from a wide variety of Christian traditions in addition to its own. Consequently, Anglicans will benefit from having their own specific resources integrated into Logos’ extensive product line (some 32,000 titles from all Christian traditions).

The Anglican tradition has significantly influenced other Christian traditions. The King James Version of the Bible was produced at the command of King James I for use in Anglican worship. Anglican bishop Thomas Ken wrote the familiar Doxology “Praise God from whom all blessings flow.” The poets John Donne and George Herbert were both writing from the Anglican tradition. More recently, the influential writings of C. S. Lewis, the biblical scholarship of N. T. Wright, the theology of J. I. Packer and John Stott, and the evangelistic/educational Alpha Course have all come out of Anglicanism. So, whether you are Anglican or not, this new product is good news. You’ll have access to the wealth of Anglican resources alongside the abundance of resources from other Christian traditions.

Under the mercy,
Benjamin Amundgaard

Get updates on all our Anglican products by joining our email list!





Last Chance: Round 1 Ends Today!

MM_200X200-05Round 1 of Logos March Madness ends today at 5 p.m. If you haven’t voted, vote now! If you have voted, help your favorite authors—share them on Facebook and Twitter.

Once Round 1 is finished, 32 authors will remain, vying for your votes to move on. For each author in Round 2, we’ll discount a collection or title by 35%.

Here are a few authors predicted to win and move on from Round 1:

  1. N. T. Wright
  2. John Piper
  3. Charles Spurgeon
  4. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

Want to see whose works will be discounted by 35%? Sign up to receive exclusive Logos March Madness updates!





Remember: get your votes in, and share with your friends.
Vote now!

Need a Bigger Book Budget? Prove It.

Pastor's LibraryYou need more books.

Whether you’re a pastor, missionary, chaplain, or church leader, you know you need more books. Most churches and organizations know you need more books, too; that’s why they give you a book budget.

But what if you need more books than your budget allows? What if your book budget just isn’t up-to-date? What if you don’t have a book budget at all?

How do you prove that you need a bigger book budget?

It’s a difficult thing to prove objectively . . . unless you have some stats to back it up.

The Pastor’s Library survey is back!

It’s time to get you some current statistics. We’re getting thousands of pastors and church leaders to weigh in on important book budget matters, like:

  • Does your church provide you with a book budget?
  • How has the cost of books changed?
  • How big should your book budget be?
  • How do congregation sizes relate to book budgets?

Take this 10-minute survey now. Once we get enough responses, we’ll share the results. We’ll also help you gauge how big your book budget should be, so when you ask for a bigger book budget, you’ll have the numbers to back it up.

This survey helps everyone

When you take this survey, you’re not only helping yourself. You’re also helping all these people:

  • Your congregation. You’ll understand how much money you need for books—books to help you preach the Word to your church.
  • Your family. With a bigger book budget from the church, you’ll spend less of your family’s cash out-of-pocket on books, so you can spend it on other necessities.
  • Other pastors everywhere. Your response makes this survey more reliable, helping other pastors get the book budgets they need, too.
  • Logos (and therefore, you again). Our mission is to serve the church, and the better we know you, the better we can serve you.

So, you need a bigger book budget? Let’s prove it—take the Pastor’s Library survey right now.

Preach Powerful Stories with Studies in Faithful Living

Studies in Faithful LivingFor many churchgoers, preaching represents the most important Bible study time of the week. For pastors, this creates a great sense of responsibility to use that time wisely and effectively. It can be challenging to unify a church through a study that balances engagement with depth. This is why Logos created the Studies in Faithful Living series, featuring Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, and Mary. Each volume comes as a complete church curriculum with sermon resources to simplify your sermon preparation and provide you with solid teaching tools.

The preaching resources include eight sermon outlines to equip you to preach powerful stories from the lives of the patriarchs and Mary. The sermon outlines are beautifully crafted and designed to complement and reinforce the small group lesson material found in the individual study version. At the same time, the sermons expand that material for your message, focusing on exhortation and application as well as interpretation and theology.

Each sermon also includes a teaching slideshow. With graphics, Scriptures, and reflection questions, the slideshows allow you to engage your congregation visually. The slideshows can be used as-is, or you can customize them to your own presentation style. Thumbnails of each slide appear within the sermon outline, providing a visual reference for you as you preach. Available in PowerPoint, Keynote, and Proclaim, they’re easy to use right out of the box.

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The included sermon outline handouts allow you to encourage your congregation in note-taking. In addition, an introductory sermon video and a set of graphics for the series offer your staff the tools they need to promote the sermon series.

The Studies in Faithful Living series is an engaging, thought-provoking curriculum that serves the entire church. Everyone benefits from studying the Word of God together, and these resources free up time and energy for pastors and teachers to turn their attention to the personal connections so essential for discipleship. Bring your church together around the Word with the Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan: Complete Church Curriculum or the Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection today!

Geerhardus Vos: Father of Reformed Biblical Theology

Geerhardus Vos, the “father of Reformed biblical theology,” was born 151 years ago this month. Vos, a professor of biblical theology at Princeton, lectured alongside many famous theologians, including J. Gresham Machen, B. B. Warfield, and Abraham Kuyper. So great was Vos’ academic insight that Kuyper offered him the chair of Old Testament studies at the Free University of Amsterdam when Vos was just 24.

Currently in translation into English for the first time ever, Vos’ Reformed Dogmatics is an important expression of his Reformed theology. Originally published by Vos in 5 volumes, it represents the early thought of one of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries’ premiere Reformed thinkers.

Individual titles:

  • Reformed Dogmatics: Theology Proper
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Anthropology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Christology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Soteriology
  • Reformed Dogmatics: Ecclesiology, The Means of Grace, Eschatology

Reformed Dogmatics begins with an examination of the doctrine of God—his knowability, names, being, and character. Vos discusses the evidence for the Trinity in Scripture, explores human nature, sin, and the covenant of grace, and discusses the natures and incarnation of Christ.  Finally, he takes a look at the work of Christ, as well as the church’s nature and purpose. The result is some of the most profound systematic theology of the twentieth century.

Here’s what other scholars said about Vos:

“Dr. Vos was the greatest pedagogue I ever sat under.”—Cornelius Van Til

“. . . the most penetrating exegete it has been my privilege to know.”—John Murray

“Vos’ insights are penetrating, refreshing, and orthodox.” —James T. Dennison Jr.

Don’t miss this important piece of Reformed theology—pre-order now and save 22%!

Rational Arguments for God and the World

For many philosophers, God’s existence resolves otherwise unsolvable puzzles. The great rationalistsRené Descartes, Baruch Spinoza, and Gottfried Leibniz—argued that knowledge comes not from the senses, but from reason and innate ideas. From there, they developed some fascinating notions of God and the world.

Descartes

Widely considered the father of modern philosophy, Descartes introduced Cartesian doubt and the cogito. In his Discourse on Method and Meditations, he resolved to doubt all that could be doubted. Can you doubt that you’re reading this blog post? Of course; you might be dreaming. Can you doubt that a square has four sides? Yes; a demon might be causing you to err. But a demon couldn’t trick you if you didn’t exist at all. Hence his famous cogito: “I think, therefore I am” (Cogito, ergo sum).

So why not continue doubting the whole world? Because God is good. Our inclination to believe in the world is so strong that if the world did not exist, God would be deceitful; therefore, the world exists.

Spinoza

Baruch Spinoza understood God as in every way infinite. Thought and matter, he argued, are attributes of God, and so are human souls. The chief end of humanity is not personal immortality, but union with the divine.

If the world is an attribute of God, to understand the world is to understand God. “The mind’s highest good,” Spinoza wrote in Ethics, “is the knowledge of God, and the mind’s highest virtue is to know God.” That’s a description, though, not a command—according to Spinoza, if you understand the world, such a higher good is inevitable. If you know all things to point to God, the idea of God will fully occupy your mind.

Leibniz

Building on arguments that stretch back to Aristotle, Leibniz refined four proofs of God’s existence:

  1. Ontological. In an argument built on St. Anselm and Descartes, Leibniz argued in Monadology that “There is . . . or there can be conceived, a subject of all perfections, or most perfect Being. . . . it follows also that he exists, for existence is among the number of the perfections.” That is, the essence of God is perfection, and a God who exists is better than a God who does not; therefore, God exists.
  2. Cosmological. Aristotle noted that all actions have causes, which in turn have causes, which in turn have causes. But the series can’t be infinite; the first action must be uncaused. God is the universe’s uncaused cause. Leibniz, in turn, saw the universe as contingent—not demanded by logic, not inevitable. Given that logic permits the universe not to be, and that the universe contains no reason for its being, it points to a reason beyond itself: God.
  3. Eternal truth. Leibniz observed that statements—thoughts—are true in different ways. Though “it’s sunny” may sometimes (or, in Bellingham, rarely) be true, “2 + 2 = 4” is true eternally. And thoughts are the work of minds. An eternal truth must be the work of an eternal mind: God’s.
  4. Design. The world, noted Leibniz, is full of things that can’t be explained by blind natural forces. Such things testify to a creator. Though Leibniz advanced this argument long before Darwin proposed evolution, Leibniz’s point sounds familiar: it’s the thrust of today’s Intelligent Design.

Such notions and proofs of God aren’t biblical, of course. They’re grounded in pure reason, and that’s what makes them fascinating. It’s worth remembering that, in seeking to explain the world, some of the West’s most important thinkers turned to God.

The Classics in Rationalist Philosophy Collection articulates these arguments and more

And right now, it’s on Community Pricing at 84% off! With more bids, the price could go even lower.

Revisit some of philosophy’s most interesting arguments about God, mind, and the worldplace your bid now.

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