Logos Wins Prestigious Software Industry Award

Logos Bible Software 4: 2011 CODiE Award WinnerLogos Bible Software 4 has been named the winner of the SIIA’s prestigious CODiE Award for Best Educational Reference Solution.

With the release of Logos Bible Software 4 back in November 2009, we knew we had something special. Logos 4 was all-new. It was like no other product out in the marketplace, and like no other product we had produced before. We knew we had introduced a brand new award-wining software. It just wasn’t offical, until now.

Logos 4 has just been recognized by the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) as the Best Educational Reference Solution.

Since 1986, the SIIA’s CODiE Awards program has showcased the software and information industry’s finest products. The award holds the distinction of being the software industry’s only peer-reviewed award as SIIA members are comprised of leading companies in the business software, digital content, and education technology industries. Throughout the award’s history, this is the first time Bible study software has not only been named a finalist, but has also gone on to win the SIIA’s CODiE Award in its category.

Due to the large undertaking in rebuilding Logos from the ground up—instead of simply reusing 15–20-year old code for an update—we hoped Logos users would find Logos 4 to exceed their expectations. It did. Logos users quickly navigated past the initial learning curve Logos 4 posed, and discovered a new way of doing Bible study. And the CODiE Award judges got to see exactly what makes Logos 4 so special.

Judges put Logos 4 through a stringent review process consisting of evaluating product-specific material and online support articles and training videos. Finally, a live online product demonstration was coordinated so judges could see a first-hand demonstration before evaluating and scoring Logos 4. Part of the evaluation focused on the program’s customization features, ease of use, navigation, richness and focus of search results, and use of graphics, among other components.

Based on the above components, Logos Bible Software 4 seemed to be exactly what the Best Educational Reference Solution category was intended for. Among others in the same category, Logos 4 beat out NBC News Archives on Demand from NBC Learn.

Some 425 products and services were nominated this year. Then third-party judges reviewed and evaluated each item before determining finalists. SIIA members then reviewed the finalists and voted to select the winners.

Winning the 2011 CODiE Award now puts Logos Bible Software in the company of past CODiE Award winners such as Adobe, Dell, Cision, Red Hat, SalesForce, Wall Street Journal Professional, and Zendesk.

In the nearly twenty years Logos Bible Software has been around, winning the CODiE Award is a crowning achievement for an excellent product, but more so, for the world-class team here at Logos who is dedicated to providing the best Bible study tool available.

Moving forward, we are committed more than ever to excellence and to being a leader in educational technology. Please leave a comment letting us know how Logos Bible Software 4 has changed the way you do Bible study. And if you are still haven’t upgraded to Logos 4, isn’t it time you discovered what you’re missing?

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1

Sproul

What is a Lectionary?

A lectionary is a book or list of selections from Scripture (sometimes called “pericopes,” “lections,” or “lessons”) chosen for reading in public worship. The Christian practice of Scripture reading in public worship likely derived from the synagogue, and over time, in both Jewish and Christian traditions, the pericopes associated with the different Sabbaths or Sundays and other celebrations of the year were fixed and compiled in books and lists. For the traditions that use them, these lectionary pericopes often form the basis for preaching and provide themes for worship.

Who Uses a Lectionary?

Use of a lectionary is usually associated with the more liturgical traditions within Christianity, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism and Lutheranism. Nonetheless, in recent decades, some non-liturgical churches have also adopted optional or occasional use of a lectionary as a way of broadening the texts used for preaching or relating Sunday worship to the church year.

What are the Most Common Lectionaries in Use?

Until the 20th century, most Western Christian liturgical traditions used some derivative of the lectionary of the Roman Rite that took shape in the Middle Ages. This lectionary consists of an annual cycle of readings assigning an epistle and a Gospel pericope to each mass.

Lutherans and Anglicans reformed this lectionary in accord with Reformation understandings of Scripture and worship, while the reforms of the Council of Trent adjusted and standardized this lectionary for use in Catholic liturgy. These lectionaries are still used by some Lutheran and Anglican/Episcopalian congregations and in Catholic communities that celebrate the traditional Roman Rite.

Logos Bible Software base packages include two Lutheran Lectionaries that follow the traditional, one year, format: the Christian Worship One Year Lectionary from the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary from the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

In the 1960s, the lectionary for the Roman Rite in the Catholic Church was revised in response to the Second Vatican Council’s call for more extensive use of Scripture in the liturgy. The traditional lectionary was replaced with a three year cycle of three readings for Sundays and major feasts days and a two year cycle of two readings for daily mass. For most of the year, the Sunday cycle consists of an Old Testament reading, a non-Gospel New Testament reading and a Gospel reading. The lectionary also supplies a Responsorial Psalm that follows the first reading.

This arrangement found favor not just in the Catholic Church but among Protestants as well, and many churches began adopting versions of it. The ecumenical collaboration of the Consultation on Common Texts eventually resulted in the Revised Common Lectionary in 1992, which today is the most commonly used lectionary among English-speaking Protestants. As a consequence of this development, the same texts are proclaimed, reflected and preached upon on any given Sunday in congregations around the world and across many Christian traditions.

Logos Bible Software base packages include six of these modern three-year lectionaries:

Are the use of lectionaries important to you in your private or public worship? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Next week we will look at using lectionary resources in Logos 4.

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Dig Deeper into the Word(s)

Today’s guest post is by Elise Bryant, from the Logos Bible Software Accounting department.

I feel like I’ve grown spiritually by listening to radio ministries. Three of my favorite teachers are Beth Moore, Kay Arthur and Nancy Leigh DeMoss. I’d hear them constantly refer to Greek and Hebrew—the languages that the Bible was first written in—to unlock the depth and beauty of Scripture. By doing word studies, they seemed to uncover the meaning of so many words that get lost in translation. Can I learn how to do the same thing in Logos? How can I follow along with them to know what they are saying is accurate?

What you just read came out of an email I sent out to my co-workers at Logos a while ago. My name is Elise Bryant and I work in the Accounting department at Logos. It’s funny, but even though I work here, I wasn’t familiar with our software. I just didn’t know how to use it to understand Scripture on a deeper level. So I asked my co-workers for some help.
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Logos 4: Quickly Clean Up a Messy Desktop

mp|seminars TipsWhen I primarily studied with print books, I normally spread them out on my desk and quite often “lost” resources as they became buried under others. Where is that commentary? I know it was here a minute ago. I’m sure you can relate.

If we’re not careful the same thing can happen with Logos. We get lost in study and pretty soon we have numerous Bibles, commentaries, dictionaries and the like, all scattered about on the Logos desktop. We may lose valuable study time with a cluttered desk.

Well, help is on the way. If you want to quickly clean up that messy desktop try this:

  • Choose the Layouts menu
  • Click one of the prearranged layouts (the light gray boxes) in the lower left of the menu
Logos 4: Layouts

Logos 4: Layouts

Please notice that Logos tries its best to organize your open resources, placing Bibles with Bibles, commentaries with commentaries, and so on. I only wish someone would do that with my print books on my desk!

What do you think about the preset Layouts? Do you use them, or do you create your own? Let us know by leaving us a comment. Then, feel free to share your Layout with others by uploading a screen capture to Facebook and tagging Logos!

The Chesterton Birthday Sale!

Gilbert Keith ChestertonSunday, May 22, marks the birthday of British writer, G. K. Chesterton, and Logos is celebrating with a huge sale on the eleven-volume G. K. Chesterton Collection. Today through June 3, 2011, you can get the G. K. Chesterton Collection for over 60% off the retail price! For more information on how to take advantage of this deal, check out the end of this post.

Who is Chesterton?

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, writer of approximately 80 books, around 200 short stories, over 4000 essays, several plays, and hundreds of poems, is often considered one of the great minds of the early twentieth century.

Involving himself in many of the important discussions of his day, Chesterton showed great aptitude and intelligence across a wide spectrum of disciplines. He was well known as a Christian apologist, poet, playwright, journalist, lecturer, debater, literary critic, biographer, philosopher, novelist, and even as a contributor to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Contemporaries of Chesterton knew him to be both a deep and profound thinker as well as incredibly witty and jovial personality. George Bernard Shaw, who was both a friend of Chesterton’s and a frequent philosophical sparring partner, called Chesterton “a man of colossal genius.”
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New Christian eBook Store to Launch Up to 25,000 Books in 2011

What Is Vyrso?

Within the publishing world, books can generally be divided into one of two categories: reference books and trade books. Reference books include things like commentaries, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and other academic works. You can put almost everything else—novels, popular non-fiction, and children’s books—into the trade book category.

For nearly twenty years—long before the ebook boom—Logos has been bringing you the best in electronic reference books. With Vyrso, Logos is bringing that experience and expertise to trade books.

Vyrso helps you find, buy, and read your favorite Christian books. The Vyrso store will offer your favorite bestselling and classic Christian books, and you can use the Vyrso reader on iPad, iPhone, and (soon!) Android devices.

(Vyrso titles also work in Logos Bible Software 4, and you’ll be able to read all your Logos 4 titles in the Vyrso reader, too!)

To get a picture of what’s to come, check out these 25 bestsellers and start reading them with the Vyrso app today. For a limited time, all ebooks are at least 50% percent off!

Look for up to 25,000 books available by the end of 2011.
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Now on Pre-Pub: The Eerdmans Biblical Resources Series

“We should not limit ourselves to a certain field or type of book. There are good books in all the various phases of life and human experience. We should feed our minds with a variety of thoughts, as we do our stomachs with a variety of foods. . . . Great books are like mountain tops. They take us toward the skies, a new realm, and a new vision of the world and creation . . . . The greatest of all books are those that bring us near Divine truth, with a message of righteousness to all mankind.”
—William B. Eerdmans

Since 1911, the Eerdmans Publishing Company has made it a priority to publish only the finest in religious literature, featuring works from authors like C. S. Lewis, George MacDonald, Karl Barth, N. T. Wright, Philip Yancy, and John Calvin. Eerdmans is focused on publishing books across a variety of platforms to bring perspectives and ideas to new readers. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Logos is making another collection from this publishing company available to our users.

Comprised of works by biblical scholars, the Eerdmans Biblical Resources Series (14 vols.) brings you a powerful resources to aid in your biblical study. Whether you’re interested in discovering the deeper meaning behind poetry in Scripture or are grappling with the theology of manhood and womanhood, you will be amazed by the information available. These aren’t your everyday perspective-as-facts resources backed up with limited citations—these books are chock-full of information from ancient texts, historians, and other scholars.

Let’s be honest, we read the Bible for understanding—being aware of the historical and cultural context as you study is a key to grasping the significance of the text. Though we will never be able to fully apprehend the wisdom contained in the Bible, these volumes can bring more clarity to your personal study, and hopefully, “near Divine truth.”

Don’t miss your chance to get the Eerdmans Biblical Resources Series while it’s at its amazing Pre-Pub price.

Are there resources in this collection that are favorites of yours? Do you have some favorite Eerdmans titles? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Stanley Porter’s Idioms of the Greek New Testament

Idioms of the Greek New TestamentHave you had some instruction in Greek? A year in seminary or college awhile back, or you worked through a grammar on your own or in a group? Or you’ve just picked up stuff as you’ve studied?

Maybe you feel pretty good about what you’ve learned so far and can use lexicons like BDAG and TDNT, but reference grammars (like BDF and Wallace) are still unfamiliar territory.

Maybe you’re fine with “genitive” and “dative” and even “finite verb”, but when folks start talking about instrumental datives or transitive verbs, your eyes glaze over and your thoughts go elsewhere.

Good news: Stanley Porter’s Idioms of the Greek New Testament is geared toward you. It is an excellent and readable “intermediate handbook” that can help bridge the gap. Porter explains in his introduction:

My purpose for this book is modest. This book is designed for students who have completed approximately one year of Greek, and who would like an intermediate handbook to help them make a transition to using advanced grammars such as BDF, Robertson, Moulton and Turner.
Porter, S. E. (1999). Idioms of the Greek New Testament (14). Sheffield: JSOT.

The table of contents gives the range of items found in this 340 page book. It also includes a short glossary along with reference and subject index.
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Download a Free Czech Bible!

Do you read Czech? Or do you know someone who does?

We are excited to announce that Logos has recently released the Český Studijní Překlad (Czech Study Bible). The biblical text of the Czech Study Bible is easier to understand while maintaining the rich vocabulary and style of past translations. The translators of the Czech Study Bible have worked hard to translate the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts for increased accuracy. Filled with thousands of study notes and cross references, the Czech Study Bible will help increase the depth and breadth of passages you are studying. So pick up your free Czech Study Bible today!

Then consider adding another Czech resource to your library!

Logos also has the Czech Bible: 21st Century Edition available on Pre-Pub. This resource is translated into contemporary Czech, offering clarity and understanding as you read and study the Bible. This resource is currently the best modern Czech translation of the entire Bible. Order this new translation today on Pre-Pub and get it for only $19.95.
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Logos 4: Copy Images from a Resource

mp|seminars TipsDo you ever come across an image in a resource and think it would be nice to use it in a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation? Or within a Word document? Accomplishing that is just a right click away:

  • Open a resource to a location with an image, such as The Bible Knowledge Commentary to Genesis 10:1, where you find an graphic depicting part of Noah’s family tree.
  • Right click on the image.
  • Select Image from the right menu.
  • Select one of the options such as Send to PowerPoint, Send to Keynote, or Copy (of course if you click Copy you’ll have to navigate to a document and execute a Paste).

The Bible Knowledge Commentary: Noah's Family

Have you used an image from Logos in a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation recently? Or are you going to now that you know how easy it is? If so, leave us a comment and let us know which image. Then feel free to upload it to Facebook and tag Logos!