Get a Free Resource for Washington’s Birthday

Today Logos joins the rest of the United States in celebrating Washington’s Birthday (don’t worry, the sales team will still be here to take your orders!). You can celebrate with us by downloading a free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States. But hurry, it will only be available until midnight on Tuesday, February 21!

The Background of Washington’s Birthday

Americans have celebrated George Washington’s birthday long before it was declared a national holiday. It wasn’t until 1879 that February 22, became a national legal holiday (one of only 11 permanent holidays established by Congress). In 1968, Congress passed the Monday Holidays act which moved the celebration of Washington’s birthday from February 22 to the third Monday in February.

While there have been many attempts to change the name of the holiday to Presidents’ Day in honor of both Washington and Abraham Lincoln (whose birthday falls on February 12), this proposal has always been rejected by Congress. Contrary to popular belief, the holiday is still Washington’s Birthday.

Since 1862, George Washington’s Farewell Address has traditionally been read in the United States Senate. This document includes the following profound statement:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”

Check Out These Deals!

We have also discounted some other political and patriotic titles. Check deals on these titles:

Don’t miss an opportunity to add these resources to your library. They go back to their regular prices at midnight on Tuesday, February 21.

If you want to browse similar titles, you can do a faceted search under the topic Politics & Government. Faceted browsing is a great way to find materials you may have missed.

So download your free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States today, check out some of the other deals we have available, and have a happy Washington’s Birthday!

Weekly Roundup: February 18

The Weekly Roundup is a regular feature alerting you to significant things happening at Logos this week. Take a few moments to check out these newsworthy items for the week of February 18, 2012.

Enter to Win Two Free Passes to Camp Logos and a Tour of the Logos Campus!

Would you like to visit Bellingham, WA, get two passes to our National Camp Logos, and tour the Logos facility? You can win an all-expense-paid trip to do just that! Take the virtual tour and enter to win.

Logos Talk

Interesting Discussions

Facebook

Twitter

Vyrso now has Daily Deals! Follow on Twitter @Vyrso and look for #DailyDeal in the tweet.

Pinterest

Logos

Vyrso

Pre-Pubs

New Pre-Pubs

Last Chance Pre-Pubs

These are Pre-Pubs shipping next week. Don’t miss your last chance to pick these up at their amazing Pre-Pub prices!

Community Pricing

Be sure to check out the latest collection from Community Pricing: the Classic Anabaptist and Mennonite History Collection (19 vols.)

  • Containing the writings of early Anabaptists like Menno Simons and Balthasar Hübmaier, as well as works from twentieth-century Mennonite scholars like Daniel Kauffman and J. S. Hartzler, the Classic Anabaptist and Mennonite History Collection (19 vols.) is a must-have for those interested in Reformation history.

Don’t miss out on these collections nearing the 100% mark!

Job Postings

Logos is hiring! Here are just a few of the newest postings on our Careers page:

Marketing Department

Graphic Design and Video

Sales

Software Development

Publications

Ministry Development

Customer Service

Finance

Operations

Was there anything else from Logos you found interesting this week? Leave us a comment and let us know!

63 Bestselling Zondervan Books on Pre-Pub: What You Need to Know

Now you can get 63 new Zondervan books available at some of the best prices anywhere—digital or print: Books like Michael Horton’s The Christian Faith, a dozen new volumes in the NIV Application Commentary, and a lot more are available for pre-order in a discounted 63-volume bundle and a dozen smaller collections.

It’s a ton of content, so here’s a quick look at some of the highlights:

New Releases and Bestsellers

Michael Horton’s The Christian Faith has been one of the most-requested books in the last few months. This book is Horton’s long-anticipated systematic theology. It also received a 2011 Christianity Today Book Award, and has received praise in journal reviews and on prominent blogs.

You’ll also get Michael Williams’ new book, How to Read the Bible through the Jesus Lens, which Justin Taylor called “the sort of book I’d love to have in the hands of every member of my church!” If you enjoyed Fee and Stuart’s How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth, then Williams’ book is right up your alley.

The bundle contains lots of other bestsellers, like Scot McKnight’s The King Jesus Gospel and The Blue Parakeet, Andreas Köstenberger’s Theology of John’s Gospel and Letters, Carl Rasmussen’s recently updated Zondervan Atlas of the Bible, Gregg Allison’s Historical Theology, and dozens more.

Commentaries

We’ve made 12 additional volumes in the NIV Application Commentary available for Logos users. In fact, this is the first time these volumes have been available anywhere in a high-quality digital format. So if you already own the commentaries on the New Testament and the Prophets, this is the perfect chance to round out your set.

The bundle contains lots of other commentaries, too, like the newest volumes in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series by Thomas Schreiner and Clinton E. Arnold, and a new commentary on Revelation by Chuck Swindoll.

Bible Dictionaries and Reference Works

You’ll also get Moises Silva’s Essential Companion to Life in Bible Times and The Essential Bible Dictionary, as well as The Essential Bible Companion to the Psalms, by Brian Webster and David Beach.

This is just a quick summary—there are more than 63 volumes altogether. Check out the product page to see the full booklist.

An Incredible Value!

If you were to get all these books in print, you would pay $1,674.37, and even if you searched the web and found the best deals, you would still pay well over $1,000.00. For a limited time, you can get all these books for around $899.95 on Pre-Pub, which works out to around $14 per volume.

This pricing is available for a very limited time. We’re already working on these books, and we expect to ship them soon. After we ship, the price will jump, so the window of time to get this discount is quickly closing. Pre-order now!

Not quite ready to spring for the whole bundle? Then choose from a dozen smaller collections:

The main thing to remember is that all these prices will go up very soon, so pre-order today!

Watch a Logos Training Workshop Live

We are pleased to announce we will be hosting a 2 hour workshop at the Liberate Conference in Fort Lauderdale, FL on February 23.

Learn how to get the most out of your library, and get your own sermons, notes, and books into Logos. And don’t miss Dr. Sam Lamerson’s presentation on studying original languages with Logos! He will be teaching on reverse interlinears, Louw-Nida numbers, morphological and syntax searching, visual filters, and much more.

Sign Up to Watch the Workshop

You can log in February 23 and watch the workshop streaming live!

Enter your email address below, and we will send you the link, as well as reminder before the event.

Or Attend the Conference in Person

Visit LiberateConference.com to learn more about the event!

This is your chance to hear from speakers like Tullian Tchvidjian, Darrin Patrick, Paul Tripp, Elyse Fitzpatrick, and more. As a Logos customer, you can get an exclusive discount! Register to attend Liberate 2012 and get $15 off your ticket!

Liberate Registration

Use promo code LOGOS at checkout.

Why Wait until Christmas to Build Your Library? Save Big Now!

We recently made our large Christmas collections available year-round as Library Builder Collections.

Imagine if your local bookstore were to have a sale on over 2,000 books—offering them all for only $1.24 per title. By the end of the day the store’s shelves would be empty. But with Logos’ Library Builder deals, you get huge bargains that never go out of stock!

These collections are packed with the resources you need—at a price you can afford. Take a look!

The Basic Library Builder (125 vols.) contains commentaries, dictionaries, theologies, and other helpful resources. If you’re in the market for resources to build your library, but you have a tight budget to work with, the Basic Library Builder is the collection to get.

The Essential Library Builder (250 vols.)If you’re looking for a little more bang for your buck, then the Essential Library Builder is the collection for you. As with the Basic, this set contains even more important dictionaries, commentaries, and theologies to augment your library—bundled together at one low price.

The Intermediate Library Builder (500 vols.) gives you 500 books for $1.80 each including four volumes from the Pillar New Testament Commentary, three volumes from Black’s New Testament Commentary, five volumes from New American Commentary, and four volumes from the New International Greek Testament Commentary.

Note: These three collections don’t overlap with each other, so you could buy a couple of them without getting any duplicates. Even though the master collection is the best deal, all of these collections offer an amazing amount of content at amazing prices.

The Master Library Builder (2,010 vols.) the perfect collection for an expansive resource library! Adding this many titles at only $1.24 a piece is almost too good to be true. If you were to purchase the contents in this collection at their list prices, you would pay $61,127.94. With the Master Library Builder, you save over 95%! Check out the product page to see all the amazing resources which come with this collection.

These Library Builder Collections allow you to get the best resources at the best possible price. And remember, you can always use our interest-free payment plan to stretch your payments out for up to a year!

So add content (and value) to your library—check these collections out!

Did you pick up one of these collections during Christmas? Leave us a comment and tell us what you think.

Ecclesiastes Revisited: Getting to the End of the Matter

Today’s guest post is from Miles Custis, contributing editor for Bible reference projects at Logos Bible Software and author of The End of the Matter.

Scholars often disregard the ending of Ecclesiastes. They view it—especially 12:13–14—as a later addition made by some scribe who wanted to tone down the book’s negative message.

In the typical view, the message of the book is that life is difficult and hopeless (expressed in passages like Eccl 4:2–3). The author doubts God’s justice and portrays Him as distant and unconcerned. Understood this way, the concluding message to “fear God and keep His commands” is incompatible with the rest of the book.

However, a careful reading of Ecclesiastes reveals that the author promotes a hopeful, albeit realistic, view of life throughout. He portrays God as sovereign and the giver of joy (see Eccl 2:26; 3:13; 5:19–20), emphasizing that human knowledge is limited when compared with God’s sovereign power (see Eccl 3:14 and 8:16–17). So the epilogue “fear God and keep His commands,” does not contradict the rest of the book; instead, it complements the book’s message.

In The End of the Matter I take a close look at how the epilogue of Ecclesiastes relates to the rest of the book. I examine how the author uses the term hebel—typically translated as “vanity” or “meaningless”—and what he describes as hebel. I also explore the author’s values, namely wisdom, joy, and the fear of God, finding ways to understand apparent contradictions in the book (as seen in 8:12–13). Finally, I examine how the author uses the epilogue (12:9–14) and prologue (1:1) as a literary device that presents a narrative frame around “the words of Qohelet” (the “Preacher” or “Teacher”). The author shows that, while life is characterized by hebel, one should respond by fearing God and keeping His commands.

The End of the Matter is currently under development. But if you order quickly, you can pick it up on Pre-Pub while it is still only $19.95!

4 Princeton Theologians You Should Know

B. B. Warfield’s Revelation and Inspiration is February’s Free Book of the Month!
Get your free book now!

Over the years, Princeton Theological Seminary has been home to many first-class theologians and ministers, but a few stand head-and-shoulders above the rest. Among these are Archibald Alexander, Charles Hodge, A. A. Hodge, and “the Lion of Princeton,” Benjamin B. Warfield.

Archibald Alexander

As the founding principal—and first professor—of Princeton Theological Seminary (1812), Archibald Alexander forged the way in contextualizing Calvinism to the United States. He was the author of many books and treatises, including Thoughts on Religious Experience, and The Canon of the Old and New Testament Ascertained. His legacy as a strong proponent of Biblical authority played a large influential role in the lives of his successors.

See the Archibald Alexander Collection (20 vols.) on Community Pricing.

Charles Hodge

Charles Hodge was the second principal of Princeton and successor to Archibald Alexander. He was appointed Professor of Oriental and Biblical Literature in 1822. 18 years later, he was transferred to the chair of exegetical and didactic theology, where he taught until his death in 1878. Hodge instructed thousands of ministers and help revise the Presbyterian Church’s Book of Discipline. His Systematic Theology is the hallmark of his theological legacy.

See The Works of Charles Hodge (29 vols.) on Community Pricing.

A. A. Hodge

A. A. Hodge carried on the legacy of his father, Charles, serving next to him as the chair of systematic theology from 1878 to 1886. He was also an accomplished theologian, having studied and written many works on the atonement and the Westminster Confession. His theology stemmed from his experience as a pastor, his work in India as a missionary, and his teaching career spent with the students and faculty of Princeton.

See the A. A. Hodge Collection (11 vols.).

Benjamin B. Warfield

Upon A. A. Hodge’s death, B. B. Warfield was appointed to the Charles Hodge chair of systematic theology at Princeton. Warfield served from 1887 until his death in 1921.

“Those who hold to the historic doctrine today add very little to what Warfield said a hundred years ago. So also any who reject that doctrine must contend with Warfield before their work is complete. He was the theologian of inspiration. This was his gift, in God’s kind providence, to the modern church.”—Fred G. Zaspel, author of The Theology of B. B. Warfield: A Systematic Summary

Get Benjamin B. Warfield’s Revelation and Inspiration for free, this month only. And be sure to enter the 20-volume Works of B. B. Warfield Giveaway!

Have a favorite Princeton theologian? Leave us a comment!

Take the Tour and Win a Trip to Logos!

Logos Bible Software is 20 years old this year! In two decades, Logos has grown from a couple of programmers in a basement to the largest developer of Bible software worldwide. Check out our corporate headquarters in this quirky video tour of the Logos Bellingham campus.

And if you want to see us in person, you can win an all-expense-paid trip for two to attend Camp Logos and get an exclusive tour of our company! View the video and enter to win at www.logos.com/visitlogos.

Click the image to check out the video!

Have a favorite moment in the video? Let us know in the comments!

The LEB Old Testament Is Now Available

We introduced the Lexham English Bible (LEB) with a blog post in March, 2010. Initially,  only the New Testament was available. We are happy to announce that the entire Old Testament is now complete!

The LEB is a new translation that complements your primary translation. It doesn’t matter whether you use the ESV, NIV, KJV, or any other English translation, the LEB will help you to identify things like difficult texts, idiomatic phrases, and grammatical issues. When you couple the LEB with your principal translation, you will gain a better understanding of the Bible in English. Visit the Lexham English Bible page for information regarding this new translation.

Download It Now!

If you already have the Lexham English Bible as part of your Logos 4 resources, you will be receiving an update with the LEB Old Testament. If you don’t own a Logos 4 base package, you can download the LEB individually for free for Logos 4 or for older versions of Logos. From the product page, click “Add to Cart” (make sure you’re logged in) and proceed through checkout. Our checkout process currently requires credit card information, but we promise you won’t be charged.

Logos 4: Select a Note File for Highlighting Notes

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

In last week’s blog I explained how with the newly released Logos 4.5, highlighted text now becomes a new Note in a Note File. Every time we highlight text, that marked up text becomes part of the title of a new Note in a Note File. But which Note File? By default, Logos places the Highlighting Notes in a Note File with the same name as the highlighting palette. For example, text highlighted with the style On Fire goes to a Note File named Emphasis Markup (the palette containing the On Fire style). Text highlighted with the style Israel goes to a Note File named Inductive (the palette containing the Israel style).

We can, however, select a different destination Note File for each highlighting palette used:

  • Choose Tools | Highlighting
  • Rest the cursor on the name of a Highlighting palette like Inductive (1).
  • Click the drop down menu (arrow icon) that appears on the right of the pal­ette title bar (2).
  • Click the drop down menu (arrow icon) on the Save in section at the bottom of the menu (3).
  • Select (4):
    • Palette-specific note file to save Notes created with this palette of styles in the Note File bearing the name of the Highlighting palette (as explained above).
    • Most recent note file to save Notes created with this palette of styles in the Note File that was most recently active or used.
    • A note file from the list of all note files to save Notes created with this palette of styles in that specific Note File (existing Note Files created on the File menu will be listed here).

SelectNoteFile-HighlightingNotes.jpg

Please note, EXISTING Highlighting Notes created with styles from this palette will NOT be affected. All future Highlighting Notes created with styles from this palette, however, will now be saved in this designated Note File.

You can download for FREE the new Notes and Highlighting chapters from the updated Logos Bible Software Training Manuals Volumes 1 and 2.

 

How do you use notes and highlights to study? Leave a comment and let us know!