A Preacher of Blazing Clarity: John Stott’s Preacher’s Notebook

John Stott didn’t become one of the most influential evangelical leaders in the twentieth century by happenstance. Like so many preachers before him, he was always looking for ways to strengthen his preaching and ministry. Beginning in the 1940s, when Stott came across something he thought he could use, he captured it on a note card, labeled it according to topic, and filed it away in his study.

In The Preacher’s Notebook, Lexham Press collects 60 years of the quotes, illustrations, anecdotes, and prayers Stott collected—so you can incorporate them into your own life and ministry. [Read more…]

How to Explore Everything Jesus Did While on Earth


If you read this Logos blog on a regular basis you know I’m a big fan of the Bible Browser because I refer to it often. Well, once again I’ll mention it because it answers a user’s question emailed to me:

How do I search in Logos 7 for everything that Jesus did while on earth besides using the Factbook?  For example:  records of His praying, sayings, rebukes, condemnations  etc.?
[Read more…]

A Distinctive Commentary on the Gospels

Many familiar Gospel narratives are filled with geographic details that we gloss over because of our distance from the Holy Land. Yet climate, landscape, natural resources, and other features of geography leave a lasting mark on the societies and cultures that have developed within them. In a world of dirt roads and dry riverbeds, where shepherds watch their flocks in the hills and fishermen mend their nets by the sea, Jesus taught from hill and plain, using the surrounding landscape as the backdrop for his teaching. Jesus’ parables and illustrations are often brimming with geographic clues, but the significance of these distinctive details is often lost on us today.

The Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Gospels puts readers in the sandals of the disciples as they travel throughout Israel with Jesus, explaining the significance of geography for mining the riches of the biblical text. With more than fifty Gospel stories expounded from this important geographical angle, you’re bound to take away something new from these well-worn stories.
[Read more…]

5 Reasons to Pre-Order the Apollos Old Testament Commentary

The Bible is both a divine and human book, and Apollos Old Testament Commentary series takes both aspects seriously.  This collection is still on Pre-Pub, but it’s going to ship April 20. That means your chance to pick up this ten-volume series at a steep discount is disappearing fast. Here are five reasons to pre-order this collection today.
[Read more…]

The Key to Not Being a Bad Bible Reader

Psalm 37:8 is one of the most important illustrations of the most important concept in my new book, Authorized: The Use and Misuse of the King James Bible. As I’ve been working on promoting the book, I’ve been talking about Psalm 37:8 in the KJV again and again. I’ve recited it probably 50 times to various people in the last year as I’ve explained my project:

Cease from anger and forsake wrath; fret not thyself in any wise to do evil. (Psalm 37:8 KJV)

But on Sunday at my church we read through the entire psalm in a contemporary translation and I, to my chagrin, noticed something: I’d spent so much time quoting the verse that I’d forgotten the context. I’d violated the cardinal rule of Bible interpretation. Bad Bible reader! Bad!

By itself Psalm 37:8 sounds oracular, proverbial. It sounds like a memory verse for a guy who is prone to blowing up at his kids. At least the first half of the verse sounds good for that purpose:

Cease from anger and forsake wrath.

[Read more…]

Carson, Duncan, Begg, Others on Scriptural Authority

If you had to prove why the Bible is God’s word, what would you say?

Even among Christians, confidence in the Bible’s authority is waning. Many are casting aside the doctrines of inerrancy and inspiration, with devastating consequences.

The God Who Speaks seeks to correct this. It’s a documentary about the divine authority of Scripture, and it features insights from some of today’s leading theologians on why Scripture is trustworthy.
[Read more…]

How to Execute a Hebrew Lemma Phrase Search


Today’s blog is based on a question from a Logos user who is digging deep into the Hebrew text:

I am trying to find every instance in the  OT where the Hebrew words are in an exact sequence.  For instance, if I search in English for “who did not know” in the OT, I get two results. But are there other verses that have the same Hebrew words, but have been translated differently? For instance, in Exodus 1:8 “who did not know” is translated from “אֲשֶׁר לֹא ידע”. So, I would like to see if there are other verses that have these Hebrew words in this sequence,  but translated differently than in Exodus 1:8 and Judges 2:10.

[Read more…]

Are Guardian Angels Really Biblical?

“Every time a bell rings, an angel gets its wings.”

These are familiar words for those of us who make a holiday tradition of watching the classic film It’s a Wonderful Life. The angel Clarence helps George Bailey discover the unseen but tremendous significance his mundane life played in the lives of others. It’s a heartwarming story, full of hope and encouragement. But what about its theology? Are guardian angels—like Clarence—really biblical?
[Read more…]

How to Write a Funeral Sermon

If you are a preacher of the Word, you will one day have to preach a funeral. And that one day might be Tuesday. Even if you’ve heard a lecture in class on how to prepare for a funeral, it’s almost impossible for that lecture to cover all the bases: every death is different, because every human is a special creation of God.

Though every funeral sermon should also be, therefore, unique and different, the central task is still the same as that of any sermon: to faithfully herald what God has said in Scripture. You will have to face this question:

How can I write a faithful, concise, powerful, comforting sermon for this particular funeral service?

God has a great deal to say to the bereaved, and these principles will help you share his message at a funeral.
[Read more…]

What Did Jesus Mean by “Gates of Hell”?

“Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah!… I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it” (Matt 16:17–18). The “gates of hell”? Why did Jesus respond to Peter’s confession, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God,” in this way? (16:16)
[Read more…]