Customize Your Desktop to Fit Your Workflow

Logos-6-Layouts-300pxWhen you start working in your new software, you’ll want to gather the tools and books you frequently use so you can keep them right at your fingertips. Since these are the resources you rely on for new insights and discoveries, you’ll always want them close at hand.

Track down your favorite tools and resources, then save them so you can quickly retrieve them without any hassle. The best way to do this is creating custom layouts.

Your software should fit your study, and layouts let you set your workspace exactly how you need it. Once you’ve created your layouts, you can jump right in and work efficiently, regardless of the task at hand.

With layouts, you’ll always be organized. When you first sit down to work, you won’t have to spend valuable time gathering individual resources. Plus, with a consistent, familiar workspace, you can stay focused on your studies rather than constantly rearranging your desktop to get the tools you need.

Check out this helpful tutorial where Todd, one of our Logos pros, walks you through layout creation:

 
Layouts can be as basic or as complex as you’d like—you can combine Logos 6 guides, Bible translations, commentaries, and more in the arrangement that makes the most sense for you.

You can also easily toggle between layouts created for different projects and types of study at any time. It’ll only take seconds to quickly transition from sermon prep to exegetical work to personal study. Your layouts are always readily available, so you can return to your presets whenever you’d like.

What’s your favorite layout? Share it on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #Logos6, and see what others are doing, too!

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If you don’t yet have Logos 6, get it now! You can choose your perfect base package at Logos.com/BasePackages, or give us a call at 800-875-6467.

Logos 6: Inline Searching

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Logos 6 is here! Logos just released a new version, and it’s loaded with new features and enhancements. Please don’t panic, though—what you know about Logos 5 continues with you to Logos 6, but you’ll be impressed with Logos 6′s new functionality.

For example, you can now execute searches within a resource panel without having to open a separate search panel.

Try this new Logos 6 Inline Search:

  • Open any resource, such as The Lexham English Bible (LEB)
  • Navigate to a passage, like Luke 15:10 (A)
  • Click the Inline Search icon on the Bible’s toolbar (B)
  • Notice the search criteria opens at the top of the panel
  • Change the search fields and range from drop-down lists if you desire (C)
  • Type this text in the find box: “angels of God”(D)
  • Press the Enter key to generate your search results
  • Notice the only verses now visible in the LEB are the ones containing the phrase “angels of God” (E)

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  • Right click any word in the Bible (F) and you’ll discover this text is active, meaning it’s fully functional with all links and the context menu (G)
  • Click the close X or the Inline Search icon again to hide the search information and return to a normal view of the Bible (H)

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This Inline Search works in any resource and supports searching for words, phrases, multiple terms, and more—just like you would use in the search panel.

You can even access Inline Search from the right-click or context menu!

For written instructions on all the new Logos 6 features, check out the Logos 6: What’s New? Manual.

Or, to be one of the first to receive live training for Logos 6, attend an upcoming Camp Logos in California or New York.

What’s New in Logos 6: See What You Can Do

l6-overview-gold-featuredLogos 6 is smarter, easier, and faster.

Get precise answers with new search tools, visualize the biblical world with stunning media, explore the cultural perspectives from which the Bible was written, and get streamlined tools for preaching and teaching.

Logos 6 offers everything you need to gain fresh insights and share your findings in engaging ways.

Here’s a rundown of what’s new in Logos 6:

l6-overview-better-searchingBetter searching, smarter results

We’ve streamlined searching so you can find the answers you need faster than ever. Everything Search combines all your powerful search tools, so you can sweep through your entire library with a click. Search any verse, topic, person—anything—and Everything Search returns a list of relevant commentaries, maps, media, original-language data, and more.

The new Factbook functions like an ever-growing encyclopedia: search any biblical person, place, thing, event, or cultural concept, and Factbook returns clickable links to maps, images, dictionaries, lemmas, library results, and more. For example, search “Solomon,” and get infographics of his temple, dictionary links, all the names he’s referred to as and where they occur, lists of his relatives and roles, Timeline events, and topics for further study, as well as Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic lemmas. Factbook gives you all the information you need on biblical topics—all in one place.

Inline Search is another powerful search tool—now, you can perform advanced searches for terms, phrases, or morph forms within your open resources. Inline Search transforms your reverse interlinear into a powerful search tool.

Here are a few other search tools you’ll want to check out:

  • Smart Search: This tool suggests interesting areas of study, so you always have new concepts to explore.
  • Media Search: Get all the media you need, all in one place. With a click, search Interactive Media, images, videos, and audio throughout your entire library and online.
  • Journals Section: Search all your scholarly journals at once. This new section includes a list of links in your Passage Guide pulled from relevant journal articles—both online and in your library.
  • Collections Section: Create custom resource collections, and your Passage Guide will include a section of search results pulled from your collections.

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Study Scripture in context

Understanding cultural concepts from biblical times is integral to understanding the Word—you can better understand the imagery and practices referenced in Scripture when you understand what they meant to the author. That’s why Logos 6 comes packed with new tools and resources to help you study Scripture in context.

The new Cultural Concepts tool identifies over 1,000 cultural concepts throughout the Bible, like religious activities, food, music, birth and death practices, marriage rituals, and economic structures, so you can derive greater meaning from biblical events. In seconds, explore all the cultural concepts expressed in a passage, then connect those concepts to ancient texts.

With the Ancient Literature tool, you can get a clear view of the Bible’s background by exploring ancient texts side by side with Scripture. This tool links Scripture to ancient texts based on shared themes, references, allusions, and more.

With Atlas, you can connect Bible narratives to their geographical context. Browse dozens of new maps, created by a professional cartographer, that offer powerful functionality—including zoom and panning options.

Check out more contextual tools:

  • Weights and Measures Converter: Convert biblical measurements into modern examples. Enter a biblical quantity and get multiple modern comparisons—you’ll see that 100 cubits equals about 11 midsized sedans or about two blue whales.
  • Interactive Table of Feasts and Sacrifices: Use this colorful infographic to compare ancient feasts and sacrifices to the modern calendar, and see the purpose, Bible references, and details for each occurrence.
  • Bible Event Navigator: Browse major Bible events in chronological order, so you can better understand biblical history.
  • Interactive Infographics: New Interactive Infographics are textbook illustrations brought to life. Explore ancient armor, temples, altars, and more.
  • Ancient Inscriptions: Explore evidence of the biblical world with easy-to-use, animated maps. Zoom in and out of locations where ancient inscriptions were found, and hover over places and artifacts for short descriptions.

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Build engaging presentations—fast

No more finishing your slides late Saturday night—with Logos 6, you can build your presentations while you study. Create quote and image slides in seconds with Visual Copy and find relevant, high-quality imagery fast with Media Search.

Logos 6 comes loaded with over 200 preaching and Bible background slides that cover every book in the Bible and include beautiful artwork on the most popular preaching topics.  We’ve also hand-selected the best images online, so you instead of wasting time image searching and getting irrelevant results, you can search for images within the software and find exactly what you need.

Use new Interactive Media resources to increase your audience’s understanding: walk them through ancient locations, travel through character paths with the Bible Event Navigator, and display closeup photos of key artifacts from the British Museum and aerial tours of biblical places.

Explore all of Logos 6’s new Media Collections:

  • Lexham Bible Background Slides: Get a slide presentation on every book in the Bible. Each slide collection includes the book’s theme, authorship, and context, and offers easily digestible maps, timelines, and content outlines.
  • Beitzel Photo Library: View over 15,000 beautiful photos of the Holy Land. Each photo is tagged by location and Bible verse for easy searching.
  • Artifacts from the British Museum: Explore the craftsmanship and artistry of biblical times with photos of key artifacts from the British Museum.
  • Logos 6 Media: Get stunning Verse of the Day art created by professional designers, presentation templates, 3D flyovers of biblical places, fine art representing significant Bible characters and events, and much more.
  • The Cultural Context of the Bible: View seminary-level presentations from distinguished professor and New Testament scholar, Dr. David deSilva. Explore the biblical world as he guides you through places like Sardis, Athens, Colassae, and Hierapolis, and studies artifacts from Caesar Augustus’ reign and the Flavian Dynasty.
  • Faithlife Study Bible Media: Get into the biblical world with detailed, easy-to-understand infographics. Explore ancient buildings and places, like the Tower of Babel, Ancient Jericho, Noah’s Ark, and Rome in Paul’s day.
  • Preaching Theme Slides: Get beautiful premade slides for your next sermon or presentation! These professionally designed slides cover some of the most popular preaching topics, including holiness, healing, love and marriage, greed, and more.

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Powerful original-language tools

No matter your Greek and Hebrew expertise, Logos 6 equips you for insightful original-language study.

Explore the textual differences across ancient manuscripts with Textual Variants. This new tool brings together all the resources you need for textual-variant study: get textual commentaries, compare primary texts with modern Bible editions, study original manuscripts, and view scanned photos of original Bible texts.

With the Psalms Browser, you can reveal the poetic structure of each line in the Psalms. Group the Psalms by genre, book, author, or theme and expose the parallel structure of the Hebrew text.

Logos 6 also includes the Lexham Theological Wordbook, a groundbreaking resource that connects English concepts to their corresponding Greek and Hebrew words.

Even more Greek and Hebrew tools to explore:

  • Sense Section: Discover all the alternate meanings of Greek and Hebrew words, as well as where they occur.
  • Lexicon Alignment: Restructure your lexicons into easy-to-read outlines, so you get the information you need fast. Lemma forms will be left justified and the nuances of meanings will be indented, creating a user-friendly version of hard-to-read reference works.
  • Greek and Hebrew Alphabet Tutors: Learn to write and pronounce Greek and Hebrew in the pronunciation of your choice, including Koine, Erasmian, and Modern Greek.
  • Morph Chart: In seconds, arrange the occurrence and form of Greek lemmas into a table for easier learning.
  • Interlinear Explorer and Reverse Interlinear Explorer: Get step-by-step directions on how to use your interlinears and perform textual analysis.
  • Text Converter: Convert Greek and Hebrew text into a variety of transliteration schemes, including SBL General, SBL Academic, Scientific, Spanish, and more!

Get Logos 6 today!

Start using Logos 6 today to get better search results, study Scripture in context, build engaging presentations, and study the Bible’s original languages. With Logos 6, you’ll have everything you need for powerful study right at your fingertips. And for a limited time, take advantage of introductory discounts and offers on Logos 6.

Get Logos 6 today!

Webinar Recap: Sharpen Your Pastoral Care and Counseling

logos-5-webinar-free-trainingThis past week, in a webinar hosted by Logos expert James Fowler, we outlined some exceptional pastoral-care and counseling resources using Logos Bible Software. Fowler shared his knowledge on ways to build unique and useful counseling collections from the books you already own. He also demonstrated how to use the Cited By tool to find connections between Scripture and specific counseling situations.

If you missed the webinar, don’t worry! You can still watch the recording anytime you want and learn about all the benefits described in this important training session:

During this webinar, we featured the Chaplain’s Library, which is full of counseling resources. This extensive 591-title library provides a comprehensive collection of titles dedicated to grief counseling, discipleship, officiating, leadership, and important material for more thorough Bible study.

We’re planning additional virtual training events like this. Let us know via Facebook or Twitter what type of training you’d like us to put together for an upcoming webinar.  We value your feedback!

Then, make sure you’re in the loop: visit Logos.com/Webinar-Archive and sign up to hear about future webinar events. When we schedule the events you want, you’ll be among the first to know about them.

Logos 5: Attach Notes to Headwords

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Last week’s blog post about adding notes to verses generated some questions and comments, so I’m following up with a similar discussion about adding notes to headwords.

I’ll introduce the subject with a personal story. I remember years ago when I first started studying Scripture, every topic was brand new to me. As I studied passages, I investigated individual words and topics like Paul, redemption, Corinth, kosmos, and on and on. For every subject or word, I read articles in dictionaries, encyclopedias, and lexicons recording my findings on paper. Inevitably in a few weeks, I’d come across the same topic or word in a different text, so I’d either rifle through paper looking for my previous findings or start the study from scratch again. Digging a deep well from which to draw water was slow going for me in the beginning.

With my testimony as a backdrop, imagine every time you study an English, Hebrew, or Greek word, you deposit your discoveries safely in a notes document. Then the next time you study that same word, Logos will indicate that you’ve been down that road before, and with the click of a button, all of your previous research will be available to you!

Here’s how to do just that:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the Notes file something like “English Words” (A)
  • Open a Bible to a passage like Acts 4:36, in which Barnabas is mentioned (B)
  • Double click the word Barnabas to open a dictionary article about him (C)

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  • Right click anywhere within that article (D)
  • Select Headword Barnabas from the right-click menu (E)
  • Select Add a note to “English Words” (or whatever you named the notes document) (F)

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  • Notice that Logos creates a note in the file named Barnabas (G)
  • Also notice that Logos places a note indicator next to the headword in your dictionary (H)
  • Add all your research about Barnabas to the content box (I)

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  • Continue to add more text to this same content box as you conduct your normal research about Barnabas throughout various books
  • Close all the panels except your Bible
  • Pretend it is now weeks into the future
  • Take your Bible to Galatians 2:1, in which Barnabas is referenced again (J)
  • Right click the word Barnabas (K)
  • Select Selection Barnabas (L)
  • Select a resource, other than the one you previously opened, from the menu (M)

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  • Notice it opens to an article about Barnabas (N)
  • Look what is next to the headword in the dictionary: a note indicator saying you’ve studied this word or subject before
  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to see a preview of your content (O)

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  • Click the indicator to open the note

Since you added the note to the headword, every topical book containing an article with the headword Barnabas will have an indicator pointing to your notes document!

I encourage you also to create notes documents named “Hebrew Words” and “Greek Words“. With these files created, follow the same steps as you study Hebrew and Greek words. Over time, you’ll end up with your own personal “dictionaries” with riches you’ve mined from various resources!

If you enjoyed this, check out our other training materials for more helpful hints.

Logos 5: Attach Notes to Verses

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I recently received a question from a Logos user that I answer frequently, so I want to address it again. The question was basically this:

My understanding is when I create a note for a verse, the note indicator is to appear next to that verse in all of my Bibles. However, I’m only seeing the indicator in the Bible in which I first created the note. What’s happening?

This is a very common scenario, so we’ll patiently walk through it from the beginning.

Let’s imagine we’re going to study the book of Mark, verse by verse. As we gain insights, we want to record them in a notes document next to the corresponding verses. In addition, we want those notes to appear in all of our Bibles.

Here’s how to accomplish that task:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the file something like Mark Notes (A)
  • Open any Bible to Mark 1:1 (B)

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  • Right click any word in Mark 1:1 (C)
  • Select Reference Mark 1:1 (THIS IS THE KEY: You must choose Reference so the note will attach to that verse regardless of the Bible you’re in. If you choose Selection “the word”, the note is only attached to that word in that Bible.) (D)
  • Select Add a note to “Mark Notes” (E)

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Notice what just happened:

  • A note named Mark 1:1 was created in the notes document (F)
  • A note indicator was placed next to Mark 1:1 in the Bible (G)

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  • The note indicator will appear in all versified books, primarily Bibles and commentaries, containing an entry for Mark 1:1 (H)

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  • Add Content for the Mark 1:1 note (I)

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  • Repeat these steps for each verse as you move through Mark (J)

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  • Close the notes document, but notice the indicators remain in the Bible (K)
  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to preview the note’s content (L)

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  • Click the indicator to open the notes document

By following these steps, at the end of your research you’ll basically have a personal study Bible for Mark that will be saved and synchronized across your various devices.

If you enjoyed this, check out our other training materials for more helpful hints.

Logos 5: Ellipses in the Reverse Interlinear

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A friend and fellow Logos user recently emailed me the following scenario:

I came to John 1:34 in my study of the subject of election. As I looked at the verse in the NASB reverse interlinear, I noticed a dot (bullet) between the words “the” and “son”. What does that mean?

This is an excellent observation and question. First, I’ll set up what he was viewing.

  • Open the NASB to John 1:34 (A)
  • Notice the verse says “. . . this is the Son of God” (B)

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  • Click the Display link on the Bible’s toolbar (C)
  • Select InlineSurface, and Lemma (dictionary form of a word) (D)

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  • Notice the verse now reads “. . . this is the • Son of God” (E)
  • Look underneath the bullet and you’ll see a Greek lemma (F)

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In the reverse interlinear, this bullet represents an ellipsis.

The bullet may appear on the English line of text, meaning an original Hebrew or Greek word wasn’t translated in the English Bible, or the bullet may be on the lemma line, indicating an English word was inserted for clarification or smooth reading.

Even though the specific lemma wasn’t translated in John 1:34 in the NASB, with the interlinear information displayed, the lemma line is an active line of text.

  • Right click the bullet (G)
  • Select Lemma (H)
  • Select Search this resource (I)

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Look carefully at the search results, which display every occurrence of this word in the Greek text on which the English Bible is based, whether it’s translated in English or not (J).

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A situation like this may raise more questions than it answers, but Logos guides and resources can help:

  • Generate an Exegetical Guide (Guides | Exegetical Guide) for John 1:34 and pay close attention to the Apparatuses section, containing resources pointing out differences in the original language texts (K)
  • Generate a Passage Guide (Guides | Passage Guide)  for John 1:34, and in the Commentaries section, locate critical or textual commentaries you may own, which normally explain the variances in the original-language texts (L)

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While this scenario certainly isn’t an everyday occurrence in your Bible study, when you do come across an ellipsis, you know there’s some assistance for you in Logos.

If you’re looking for more assistance in navigating reverse interlinears, check out our other training materials.

Master the 15 Document Types: Part 2

Logos 5′s documents menu gives you 11 different document types (and Documents.Logos.com reveals four more). Each one works a little differently, so you’ll always have the right tool for the job.

Last week we explored the first five; this week we’ll tackle the remaining ten.

To see examples of all 15 document types, join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife group.

6. Reading plan

Logos scores top marks as a research tool. Tagging powers some of the most useful searching available anywhere. Tools like Clause Search and the Bible Word Study eliminate thousands of hours spent flipping pages and scanning book indexes.

But if you’d like to read a book from cover to cover, Logos performs just as admirably, thanks to the reading-plan document type. Construct a reading plan for any book in your library on a schedule that fits your lifestyle. Reading plans are especially helpful on devotionals, like the one below that I built for Lent based on 40 Days to the Cross: Reflections from Great Thinkers.

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7. Sentence diagram

If, like many, you learned sentence diagramming on the first day of your hermeneutics class, you’ll love this document type. Import a passage in either an English translation or its original language, and use a huge set of tools to chart your way through the text. I particularly love the pencil tool, which interprets my squiggles into perfectly straight lines.

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8. Word-find puzzle

It’s not all hard work in the documents menu—the word-find puzzle turns a Scripture passage into an brain-expanding mental exercise that’s more a game than a study tool. It’s easy to use, and it’s great for the moments when you need to look up from your study and catch your breath. And if you teach a children’s Sunday school class, these puzzles will be a big hit!

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Note: These next two types—syntax search & visual filters—represent the overlap between the documents menu and your search tools. Both are search types that can be saved for later use or shared with others on Documents.Logos.com.

9. Syntax search

Find Syntax Search—a powerful language tool that empowers you to find particular sentence structures in Scripture—under the search menu. But since these searches are complex and take longer than usual to construct, you can also save your search parameters as a document.

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10. Visual filter

Perform a real-time search in the text of your Bible using a visual filter. You can create visual filters, then turn them on or off using the display menu (which looks like a Venn diagram) whenever you have a Bible open.

In the example below, I’ve created a visual filter that highlights all the imperative verbs, drawing attention to the call to action at the end of Peter’s sermon in Acts 2. I started with a new filter (created from the documents menu), switched over to “morph” search and typed an “@” in the search box. Logos suggested various parts of speech for me to choose from. I chose verb, and Logos suggested various tenses, voices, moods, and so on. I chose the imperative mood. In the final step, I chose the “On Fire” style for Logos to mark imperative verbs.

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11. Word list

Good Bible scholars spend hours tabulating the number of times a word is used in a particular passage. But a word-list document will do that for you in three clicks.

With a Bible and new word list open side by side, just highlight the passage you’re studying, and choose to “add from selected text.” From there, you can drag the various columns up to group the entire list according to that criteria.

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NOTE: These last four types do not appear in the documents menu, but you may see them on Documents.Logos.com.

12. Presentation

Your Proclaim presentations are stored and can be shared through Documents.Logos.com. If you haven’t used Proclaim, you can try it free for 30 days!

13. Resource collection

Create custom resource collections to quickly search subsections of your library. These subsections are then stored as resource collections on Documents.Logos.com, so you can share them with others.

A team from the Logos forums has created resource collections for virtually every denomination and belief tradition and made them available through their Faithlife group. You can benefit from their hard work right now!

And if you like that, you may also enjoy the Logos Author Collections group.

14. Guide template

Logos comes with five powerful done-for-you guides that search sections of your library with the right tools for the type of study you’re doing.

In addition to these five, you can create your own guides, mixing and matching tools suit your study needs. For example, I have a guide that searches all of my collections grouped by author, so I can quickly get an overview of what particular scholars have to say about a subject or passage. I have another guide that searches my collections grouped by denomination, so I can get an overview of how different faith traditions handle a subject or passage.

15. Highlighting palette

Logos comes loaded with several highlighting palettes, but you may prefer to create your own—perhaps matching the colors you’ve used for years in your favorite paper Bible. Your custom highlighting palette becomes a document that you can share with others on Documents.Logos.com.

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Get a Logos 5 base package today and get access to thousands of Bible study resources, plus powerful study tools like these 15 document types.

To see examples of each document type, join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife group.

Webinar Recap: Streamline Your Sermon Preparation

logos-5-webinar-free-trainingLast week, in a webinar hosted by Logos expert Todd Bishop, we outlined some key steps in assisting you with your sermon preparation using Logos 5.

Todd shared ways to create custom layouts that are easy to use and navigate. He also demonstrated how to manage your workspace to match your work preferences and explained how to save your shortcuts to your most-used workspaces so you can easily access them later.

If you missed the webinar, don’t worry! You can still watch the recording anytime you want and learn about streamlining your sermon preparation from this training session:

During this webinar, we featured the Tim Keller Sermon Archive, which includes 1,233 sermons covering Keller’s preaching from 1989 to 2011.  When integrated into your digital library, these transcripts are enhanced by amazing functionality.

We’re planning additional virtual training events like this. Let us know via Facebook or Twitter what type of training you’d like to see!

Logos 5: Exploring Lemmas with the Same Root

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently presented this question to me:

I’ve noticed Logos includes the root words for Greek lemmas in English Bibles with the reverse interlinear. How might these root words be used in actual Bible study?

Excellent question! While this blog post will certainly not exhaust all that could be said, hopefully a few insights may get you started using this tool.

First, let’s begin with a few definitions

  • The manuscript form of a word refers to the actual word the biblical author used.
  • The lemma or lexical form of a word refers to how the word is “looked up” or referenced in a traditional dictionary of lexicon.
  • The root is the word from which the lemma is derived.

In very simple terms, manuscript forms are derived from lemmas, which are derived from roots.

Let’s explore this more with a specific biblical example found in Galatians 6:1, in which Paul instructs: 

. . . if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness . . .

  • Open the ESV to Galatians 6:1 (A)
  • Right click the word restore (B)
  • Select Root | Search this resource (C)

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  • Click Aligned in the search panel (D) to see in a center column the various ways different lemmas with the same root are translated in English (E)

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  • Click Analysis to display a spreadsheet of the results (F)
  • Right click on a column header (G)
  • Select at least these categories: Reference, Lemma (Greek), Result, and Sense (please note that Sense does not appear in all Logos base packages) (H)

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  • Drag one at a time Lemma (Greek) and Sense to the top of the spreadsheet (I) in order to group the results according to these categories (J)

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Here’s what you’re viewing in the spreadsheet:

  • The various NT Greek lemmas derived from the same root (K)
  • The various ways the lemmas are translated in the ESV (L)
  • The sense or contextual meaning of each lemma (M)
  • Different senses or meanings for the same lemma (N)

morris-proctor-exploring-lemmas-with-the-same-root-5-what-viewing

As you work with these results please keep these cautions in mind:

  • Don’t automatically assume a lemma has the exact same meaning as its root
  • Don’t automatically assume lemmas derived from the same root share the same meaning
  • Don’t automatically assume a lemma has the exact same meaning in every place it occurs in Scripture

With these cautions firmly in mind, it’s interesting to observe that running throughout the related lemmas are the ideas of repaircorrectprepareequip, and mature. Perhaps these lemmas and meanings provide further insights into the concept of restoring in Galatians 6:1.

By combining a search for the root and the Analysis view of the results, you can explore in detail the various facets of a word!

If this was helpful to you, check out our other training materials to help you master your Logos software.