Favorites II: Get Organized with Research Folders

Last week I answered the question “Can I save searches in Logos?” by taking a look at Favorites, one of the new features in Logos 3.

If you looked carefully at the screenshot I used to illustrate Favorites you may have noticed some interesting things in the “Crowds” folder. Take another look…

Notice that the Crowds folder contains not only searches, but also dictionary articles, notes, and even a Bible Word Study report.

Follow the Crowds

In college, I took part in a manuscript study of the book of Mark. We dug deep into the text using little more than a double-spaced printout of the gospel, lots of colored pencils, and hours of poring over the text and group discussion. (To read about the manuscript study method, check out the PDFs on StudentJourney.org, a cool new site from InterVarsity Christian Fellowship).

When reading through Mark’s gospel this way, one thing you can’t miss are the crowds. Everywhere you look, Jesus seems to be surrounded by a mob. At the time, we made a number of interesting observations concerning the ebb and flow of these crowds, and the Savior’s interaction with them…and now I’m doing some research into the topic using Logos Bible Software.

Playing Favorites

The Favorites feature in Logos 3 enables me to save and organize each step of my research by placing Favorites in my “Crowds” folder. As my study progresses (or is interrupted and resumed later), I can refer back to this folder to pull up and review any component of my research.

Just about any resource, report, or document within Logos Bible Software can be saved as a Favorite. Resources are Bibles, books or journals; reports are things like Bible Word Study, Exegetical Guide, or Compare Parallel Bible Versions; documents include notes, sentence diagrams, lists (word/vocabulary/reference/verse), or even remote library searches.

So next time you’re investigating a particular research topic or Bible passage, organize your work using Favorites folders.

Another great use of Favorites: flag stuff for later investigation. Instead of following a rabbit trail right now, make a Later folder and pop that juicy tidbit in there with a descriptive title so you can stay on track. Or when you see something that relates to a different project or research interest, pause only long enough to bookmark it to that folder. If you often find yourself wandering in your digital library, Favorites can help you stay focused.

Just think about all that Favorites can do to assist your study, and you’ll want to start using them right now!

  • Save time and frustration trying to recall later what you did
  • Instantly get back to that key resource or note file
  • Keep a commonly-used text or search at your fingertips
  • Defer your bunny trails and keep focused on the task at hand

Next in series: Favorites vs. Workspaces
If you have other ways you’re using Favorites, leave a comment here or drop me a line at daniel@logos.com…I’d love to hear about it and, who knows, it might make for an interesting follow-up blog post!

You Can’t Save Searches…or Can You?

Morris Proctor says he gets the question a lot: “Does Logos let me save my searches?”

The answer to that is…”it depends.”

Before you start throwing things, like accusations of being a weaselly marketer, let me explain. It depends on what question you’re really asking:

Can I pull up a previous search to tweak it and try it again?
Yes, absolutely! (Lob me another softball, c’mon.) When you bring up a search dialog, it automatically displays the last search you ran. But maybe you want the search you ran last week. No problem, open the search dialog and click the button labelled “Previous” to see the last 50 searches you ran from that dialog. Select one and click “OK” to load it into the search dialog.

If you’re working with graphical queries, you can use File | New, Save, Open to create and recall searches. For syntax searches, there are Load, Save and Previous buttons right in the search dialog.

What about the search results, can I save those?
Yes, but not as a search results window. Results of a Bible Search can be exported to a Verse List, where you can do cool manipulations like sort the verses, show them in a few different styles, or add more verses either manually or from a web page, file, clipboard, or Word document.

You can also use File | Export to save search results as HTML or plain text. Or just copy and paste the results into a document of your choosing. And of course you can also click the Graph Bible Search Results link in the results window and export the data to Excel.

Neato, but what I really want to do is save all my favorite searches, give them names, talk to them when I’m lonely, er, I mean organize them into groups, that kind of thing.

Great news! In Logos 3 you can do precisely that using the new “Favorites” feature. Here’s how…
After running a search, with the Search Results window as the active window, just click Favorites | Add to Favorites. Sound familiar? It should…it works just like Favorites in your web browser.

You can give your search any name you choose. You can use Greek characters in the name. You can create an unlimited number of folders and subfolders to hold all your favorites.

When you want to launch one of your saved searches, just click Favorites and click your saved search. Then click the Continue Search button to run the search. The button looks like the Play button on your VCR remote.

Voila! Your search results are there, just like you remember them.

Next in series: Get Organized with Research Folders

Hints on Reading the Logos Help Manual

In Logos Bible Software, context-sensitive help is available from dialogs or reports just by pressing the help button.
But sometimes you might just want to read the manual. And you can do that too, because the manual is a book in the system.
That’s right. Just go to My Library. Type in “help manual”. Hit enter or click on the title.
This is what is known as a non-scrolling book. It is a series of articles, each article is a separate “scrolling” region of text. Sort of like a series of web pages.
On books like this, it is handy to open up the Table of Contents Pane in the book window. Like below.

Just click the button, and the TOC Pane opens up. You can navigate the book this way. Or search it with the LDLS search engine. Set bookmarks so you can remember where you left off. It’s your choice.
Another Hint: Try the Locator Pane by clicking the button next to the TOC Pane button.

New Transliteration Keyboard

While transliteration (the process of using the Roman alphabet – or another modern alphabet – to represent the sounds of a different language written in a non-Roman script) is useful as a pronunciation aid in Greek and Hebrew books, it plays an even more important role in many non-Hebrew Semitic language reference works. It is not uncommon, for example, to see entire books on Akkadian or Ugaritic that are entirely transliterated, with no characters in the original scripts.

We at Logos are increasing our support for many of these Semitic languages, and we needed to create a keyboard for easy entry of common transliteration marks. We’ve created a keyboard that can safely replace the English (US) keyboard provided by Microsoft in Windows XP and Windows 2000, since it duplicates that keyboard completely, but adds support for common transliteration marks on keys that would be intuitive to people who use the Logos keyboards for Greek and Hebrew. Those who don’t use the English (US) keyboard as their default can, of course, install the Logos Transliteration Keyboard alongside their default keyboard, instead of replacing it. To download the Logos Transliteration Keyboard and its documentation, follow the new link on the Windows Keyboards for Ancient Languages page.

Syntax Search Example: Fronted Complements

Awhile back, I blogged on Sleepy Disciples. That blog post looked at the predicator (verb) προσεύχομαι and the different adjuncts that modified each of its occurrences in Matthew 26.
Looking at that passage again, I noticed the following embedded clause in the last adjunct in Mt 26.44:

In this embedded clause, the complement is the first thing in the clause. Some would say this is an instance of fronting, where there is non-standard (for narrative, anyway) component order.

It occurred to me that this sort of thing is now searchable, given a syntactic analysis of the text. So I created the below video which explains things a bit more and walks through setting up a syntax search that will locate fronted complements with a headword of λόγος — much like what occurs here in Mt 26.44.

Syntax Search Example: Two Words in the Same Word Group

A user commented on a recent post:

On the OpenText site, http://divinity.mcmaster.ca/OpenText/resources/articles/a8, Matthew Brook O’Donnell mentions the ability to find THEOS and AGAPE within the same word group. I have not been able to do that yet, probably because I can’t yet figure out the nesting structure I need in my search.
I wonder if you might demonstrate that or point me to one of your earlier tutorials where you have done something similar.

Since I haven’t blogged about syntax searches like this, and since there is a very cool technique using the Agreement dialogue that makes this sort of search (find two words in any order) fairly simple, I figured I’d do a screen recording video to show y’all how it works.

There are two searches detailed in the video. One answers the question with a very general search, the other searches a bit more specifically.

Genre & Source Visual Filtering for the OT

Daniel Foster just came to me and said, “Hey, I didn’t know that the Andersen-Forbes Analyzed Text has two resource-specific visual filters!” I said, “Sure, I thought everybody knew that.”
Well, if Daniel doesn’t know … okay, I guess almost nobody knows.

Visual What?
“Visual filter” may sound like something you do to a photograph to reduce red eye, but in fact it’s a simple and flexible feature that the Libronix DLS can use to modify a book’s formatting or content on the fly — that is, right when it’s being displayed. A simple visual filter is the Page Numbers visual filter, which shows page numbers inline (for resources that have page number tagging).

[Read more…]

Grammatical Relationships: Parallel English & Original Language

An earlier post on the Bible Word Study Grammatical Relationships feature garnered the following comment. I inserted the referenced graphic as well.

When I do what you did, I get everything except the side by side translations of the passage as you show above (where you made the notes in red). For instance, I just show the cite Matt 13:14, but not the translations with the colored keys to the study word and the subject. What am I missing?

Yes, this isn’t exactly obvious. Grammatical Relationships mirrors the preferences you have set for syntax search results. So try creating a basic syntax search — such as searching for all primary clauses with the word ἀγαπάω as the predicator (verb) in the OpenText.org database. You know, like we find in John 3.16. Here’s a short video to show you how: Flash, 9:20, 11 megs, with sound. [NB: When I recorded the video, my computer was in the midst of a massive process that took some significant processor cycles. So it’s a little slow in some areas.]

Then modify the search results. Note the “Current View” drop-down in the results menubar. This controls the columns. Also note the Bible button. This is where the English will come in. If your preferred Bible is the ESV, then toggling the button on should cause the ESV to display with proper highlighting in the search results window. Again, the video shows you how this works.

These preferences will then be mirrored in Grammatical Relationships.

Greek Syntax: Sleepy Disciples

Hi folks, I’m back after an extended holiday. And for an upcoming home group study, I’m starting to work through the epistle to the Colossians. So I’ve been reading it recently. In reading, I came across Colossians 1.9, which has the phrase “we have not ceased to pray for you”. In looking at the word “pray”, I noticed this is a predicator (“pray”, in an embedded clause) with an adjunct (“for you”). At least, that’s how the ESV translates it. So I wondered what other sorts of adjuncts modify the word used here for “pray” (προσεύχομαι).

This was the beginning of a rabbit trail, but a fun one. I won’t detail the syntax search (I’ve done similar searches before, check the syntax archives) but I would like to poke around a bit in one area where some interesting hits were grouped together.

In searching for adjuncts that modify προσεύχομαι, I happened across Matthew 26.36-46. In those 10 verses, there are three instances of προσεύχομαι. The first (v. 36) has two adjuncts, the second (v. 42) has three adjuncts, and the third (v. 44) has four adjuncts.

This concentration seemed interesting, so I poked through the text further. I spent all of 15 minutes or so thinking about this before I recorded the one-take video below, but it is an example of the kinds of thoughts that slowing down and examining the clause structure through the syntax graph can generate.

Serendipitous discovery facilitated.

Classical Greek Lookup

When studying Greek words, it is sometimes fun and beneficial to see how the words are used outside of the New Testament. One of the features of Logos Bible Software, version 3 is the ability to look up Greek words in the online Perseus database, which includes a wide variety of classical Greek texts, many with morphological and lexical tags, and some with English translations.

Let’s say you wanted to see references to crucifixion outside the New Testament. In this screenshot, I’ve right-clicked on σταυρόω – the verb form of ‘to crucify’ – in my lexicon (in this case BDAG), chosen ‘Selected Text’ and ‘Perseus Greek Word Lookup’. I could also have right-clicked the word in a Greek Bible and chosen ‘Selected Text’ and the ‘(Lemma)’ form instead. Of course, I may also want to run this lookup on related words, such as σταυρός – ‘cross’.

Here Perseus has provided some analysis of the word. Note the link to ‘Configure display’. Use this link to choose between displaying texts in transliteration or Unicode or some other Greek encoding. After some initial analysis, you can see hit counts by genre – in this case 92 hits in prose and 1 hit in poetry.

Clicking on ‘Greek Word Search’ will generate a concordance of the 93 hits of this word in the database, as seen below.

You can see hits in authors such as Josephus, Xenophon, Epictetus, Thucydides, and Appian. Clicking on the first line of each hit will open the Greek text to the larger context of the hit. Clicking on individual words will provide analysis to help you translate the passage. Sometimes a link to an English translation or Latin version is available as well.