Zooming Syntax Graphs

Some syntax graphs are small. Others (e.g. Rom 1.1-6; Titus 1.1-4; Col 1.3-8) are huge.

Sometimes it’s nice to zoom in and out to get a picture of the whole structure, or the extent of the clause. And that can be hard to do using the zoom button in the toolbar.

But if you have a mouse with a scroll wheel and a control key … well, it’s pretty easy. And this video shows you how.

Now try it yourself: click here to open the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed GNT: Clause Analysis and get your zoom on.

Greek Syntax: Love in the Johannines

Most folks are very familiar with the first part of John 3.16, “For God so loved the world”. In the OpenText.org Clause Analysis, that phrase is a Primary Clause (PC), and the word translated “loved” (ἀγαπάω) is the Predicator (P) of the Primary Clause.

Now, if you wanted to find other situations where the underlying Greek word (ἀγαπάω) is used similarly, you could search the New Testament for all instances of ἀγαπάω. You’d find over 100 of them. Perhaps (as the below video assumes) you’re only interested in ἀγαπάω as it is used in the writings traditionally ascribed to John. You could search all of those out too; there are 72 of them (in 51 verses).

But if you did a syntax search and just looked for where a Primary Clause has ἀγαπάω as its predicator, you’d narrow your list down to 18 hits, and you’d know they’re used as the main verb in the primary clause.

Confused? That’s OK. I recorded a video showing all of this. It’s just under nine minutes long and is about 10.6 megs. Watch out, though, I’m getting over a cold so I’m a little congested.

The Power of Search…for Discovering the Theology of a Passage

Today’s guest blogger is John Fallahee, who works in our ministry relations department and produces free tutorial videos.
Your purchase of Logos Bible Software is essential for studying the Bible. You are saving countless hours in study time; you are going further in biblical research due to our easy two-step automation of “Enter Passage, Click Go”. You are adding more books to grow and customize your library and therefore have robust search results. However, at times, there is the need to narrow your search results to find very specific information.

Let’s say you own Scholar’s Library, have created a custom collection of books on theology, and include that collection in Passage Guide. When running Passage Guide on Ephesians 2:1, you get 22 hits within your collection of theologies. Alternatively, the reference browser returns 26, 22, or 12 hits depending on your search selections.

With the following “Power Search” example, we will reduce the number of hits even more in order to target very specific and relevant information.

The “Power Search” is like a laser targeting system, which can search through shelves of books, turn pages faster than any band-aid supplied librarian (paper cuts stain pages!), and can read faster than the best graduate of “Speed-Reader University”!

All you need for the “Power Search” are 3 things:

  1. a key Bible verse
  2. a key word
  3. a key book

Open Libronix DLS, click Search | Basic Search and type the following:

bible=“eph 2:1” within 1 sentence sin

Next, select a theology collection that you previously created or downloaded (see below) from the “in” drop down box.

Then click the search button. Your hits are now reduced to just 2 relevant hits. You see, when your search specifies a collection of books plus a particular verse plus your keyword in close proximity—your hits are reduced. Note: The closer the proximity (“within 3 words” vs “within 1 sentence”) the greater will be the reduction of the number of hits. Also, a Greek or Hebrew word as a keyword will also narrow your results significantly.

As an added bonus, since we searched our theology books, we can determine the theology of this passage with this method. If you click on the search results, and locate your position in the book, you will discover the category of theology for this passage. For example, Charles Hodge’s Systematic Theology includes a discussion on original sin under the theological category of Anthropology (The Study of Man).

I made a video that walks you through each step so that you can add “Power Search” to Your Study Tool Belt.


Flash Video, 2:50, 2.8MB


By the way, to satisfy your hunger for more “Power Search” meals, simply add a book to your banquet…buffet style: Logos.com offers more than 100 books on theology and doctrine, many of which are not included in the base packages.

Collection Files to Download

Right-click the file that matches the product you own, choose “Save Target As…” and save the file to My Documents\Libronix DLS\Collections (create the folder if it doesn’t exist).


Note: “locked books” can be searched but not viewed; add theological books to your library here.

Favorites III: Favorites vs. Workspaces

I blogged about the new Favorites feature in Logos 3 here and here. Today I want to take a quick look at Workspaces—a feature that’s been part of Logos Bible Software since at least 2001—and think about when to use a Workspace and when to use Favorites.

When working on research papers in grad school, I’d go to the library, locate and pull a bunch of books I thought would be helpful, then sort them into piles, sticking slips of paper in some to mark articles, leaving others open, but always arranging them according to a logic known only to me.
Similarly, the Workspace feature of Logos Bible Software allows you to set up any number of desktop configurations that reflect the way you work.

If you have a large monitor and like to keep four Bibles open across the bottom of the screen with four commentaries across the top…you can save that as a workspace.

Or if you want to create a custom workspace for each project you’ve got going, you can do that, too. Last year, Rick Brannan wrote about his personal workspace and showed a screenshot at Ricoblog. Workspaces maximize your efficiency and make the software work the way you work.
(For step-by-step instructions on how to set up a workspace, view the tutorial video.)

This leads us to the question…

When should I use Favorites and when should I use Workspaces?
If the layout of the windows and resources—their placement on the screen—is important to you…then save as a workspace. All your visible windows, tabs, even minimized windows in the background, are preserved.

Workspaces are ideal when you have a long and fairly focused project that you’ll be working on over time, using many of the same resources and reports. They are also great for taking a “snapshot” of your Logos desktop at the end of the day so you can pick up at the same spot tomorrow.

In Logos 3, there are buttons right on the toolbar for loading and saving a workspace so this is very quick and easy.


The limiting factor with a workspace is that it’s an all-or-nothing approach. You can’t load just part of a workspace.

Favorites, on the other hand, are much more granular. They don’t preserve the placement on the screen, but they are a great way to flag a specific location in a specific resource. Or to save a single search, as I showed in an earlier post.

The good news is that Workspaces and Favorites can work in tandem, to really supercharge your study. You can save a workspace that puts all your resources and reports just where you want them. Then use Favorites to load varying information into those “slots.” So if New American Commentary is one window in your workspace and you have a saved Favorite for Matt. 7:28 in NAC, clicking that Favorite will jump the commentary to that spot while leaving your screen layout intact. (Note: This seems to work best with resources; launching a report from Favorites will open it in a new window).

So there you have it, some tips on when to use workspaces, when to use favorites, and how they can complement one another. I exhort you to go forth and experiment to get comfortable with both features and figure out how they can most effectively support you in the way you study.

Favorites II: Get Organized with Research Folders

Last week I answered the question “Can I save searches in Logos?” by taking a look at Favorites, one of the new features in Logos 3.

If you looked carefully at the screenshot I used to illustrate Favorites you may have noticed some interesting things in the “Crowds” folder. Take another look…


Notice that the Crowds folder contains not only searches, but also dictionary articles, notes, and even a Bible Word Study report.

Follow the Crowds

In college, I took part in a manuscript study of the book of Mark. We dug deep into the text using little more than a double-spaced printout of the gospel, lots of colored pencils, and hours of poring over the text and group discussion. (To read about the manuscript study method, check out the PDFs on StudentJourney.org, a cool new site from InterVarsity Christian Fellowship).

When reading through Mark’s gospel this way, one thing you can’t miss are the crowds. Everywhere you look, Jesus seems to be surrounded by a mob. At the time, we made a number of interesting observations concerning the ebb and flow of these crowds, and the Savior’s interaction with them…and now I’m doing some research into the topic using Logos Bible Software.

Playing Favorites

The Favorites feature in Logos 3 enables me to save and organize each step of my research by placing Favorites in my “Crowds” folder. As my study progresses (or is interrupted and resumed later), I can refer back to this folder to pull up and review any component of my research.

Just about any resource, report, or document within Logos Bible Software can be saved as a Favorite. Resources are Bibles, books or journals; reports are things like Bible Word Study, Exegetical Guide, or Compare Parallel Bible Versions; documents include notes, sentence diagrams, lists (word/vocabulary/reference/verse), or even remote library searches.

So next time you’re investigating a particular research topic or Bible passage, organize your work using Favorites folders.

Another great use of Favorites: flag stuff for later investigation. Instead of following a rabbit trail right now, make a Later folder and pop that juicy tidbit in there with a descriptive title so you can stay on track. Or when you see something that relates to a different project or research interest, pause only long enough to bookmark it to that folder. If you often find yourself wandering in your digital library, Favorites can help you stay focused.

Just think about all that Favorites can do to assist your study, and you’ll want to start using them right now!

  • Save time and frustration trying to recall later what you did
  • Instantly get back to that key resource or note file
  • Keep a commonly-used text or search at your fingertips
  • Defer your bunny trails and keep focused on the task at hand


Next in series: Favorites vs. Workspaces
If you have other ways you’re using Favorites, leave a comment here or drop me a line at daniel@logos.com…I’d love to hear about it and, who knows, it might make for an interesting follow-up blog post!

You Can’t Save Searches…or Can You?

Morris Proctor says he gets the question a lot: “Does Logos let me save my searches?”

The answer to that is…”it depends.”

Before you start throwing things, like accusations of being a weaselly marketer, let me explain. It depends on what question you’re really asking:

Can I pull up a previous search to tweak it and try it again?
Yes, absolutely! (Lob me another softball, c’mon.) When you bring up a search dialog, it automatically displays the last search you ran. But maybe you want the search you ran last week. No problem, open the search dialog and click the button labelled “Previous” to see the last 50 searches you ran from that dialog. Select one and click “OK” to load it into the search dialog.

If you’re working with graphical queries, you can use File | New, Save, Open to create and recall searches. For syntax searches, there are Load, Save and Previous buttons right in the search dialog.

What about the search results, can I save those?
Yes, but not as a search results window. Results of a Bible Search can be exported to a Verse List, where you can do cool manipulations like sort the verses, show them in a few different styles, or add more verses either manually or from a web page, file, clipboard, or Word document.


You can also use File | Export to save search results as HTML or plain text. Or just copy and paste the results into a document of your choosing. And of course you can also click the Graph Bible Search Results link in the results window and export the data to Excel.

Neato, but what I really want to do is save all my favorite searches, give them names, talk to them when I’m lonely, er, I mean organize them into groups, that kind of thing.

Great news! In Logos 3 you can do precisely that using the new “Favorites” feature. Here’s how…
After running a search, with the Search Results window as the active window, just click Favorites | Add to Favorites. Sound familiar? It should…it works just like Favorites in your web browser.


You can give your search any name you choose. You can use Greek characters in the name. You can create an unlimited number of folders and subfolders to hold all your favorites.

When you want to launch one of your saved searches, just click Favorites and click your saved search. Then click the Continue Search button to run the search. The button looks like the Play button on your VCR remote.

Voila! Your search results are there, just like you remember them.


Next in series: Get Organized with Research Folders

Hints on Reading the Logos Help Manual

In Logos Bible Software, context-sensitive help is available from dialogs or reports just by pressing the help button.
But sometimes you might just want to read the manual. And you can do that too, because the manual is a book in the system.
That’s right. Just go to My Library. Type in “help manual”. Hit enter or click on the title.
This is what is known as a non-scrolling book. It is a series of articles, each article is a separate “scrolling” region of text. Sort of like a series of web pages.
On books like this, it is handy to open up the Table of Contents Pane in the book window. Like below.

Just click the button, and the TOC Pane opens up. You can navigate the book this way. Or search it with the LDLS search engine. Set bookmarks so you can remember where you left off. It’s your choice.
Another Hint: Try the Locator Pane by clicking the button next to the TOC Pane button.

New Transliteration Keyboard

While transliteration (the process of using the Roman alphabet – or another modern alphabet – to represent the sounds of a different language written in a non-Roman script) is useful as a pronunciation aid in Greek and Hebrew books, it plays an even more important role in many non-Hebrew Semitic language reference works. It is not uncommon, for example, to see entire books on Akkadian or Ugaritic that are entirely transliterated, with no characters in the original scripts.

We at Logos are increasing our support for many of these Semitic languages, and we needed to create a keyboard for easy entry of common transliteration marks. We’ve created a keyboard that can safely replace the English (US) keyboard provided by Microsoft in Windows XP and Windows 2000, since it duplicates that keyboard completely, but adds support for common transliteration marks on keys that would be intuitive to people who use the Logos keyboards for Greek and Hebrew. Those who don’t use the English (US) keyboard as their default can, of course, install the Logos Transliteration Keyboard alongside their default keyboard, instead of replacing it. To download the Logos Transliteration Keyboard and its documentation, follow the new link on the Windows Keyboards for Ancient Languages page.

Syntax Search Example: Fronted Complements

Awhile back, I blogged on Sleepy Disciples. That blog post looked at the predicator (verb) προσεύχομαι and the different adjuncts that modified each of its occurrences in Matthew 26.
Looking at that passage again, I noticed the following embedded clause in the last adjunct in Mt 26.44:

In this embedded clause, the complement is the first thing in the clause. Some would say this is an instance of fronting, where there is non-standard (for narrative, anyway) component order.

It occurred to me that this sort of thing is now searchable, given a syntactic analysis of the text. So I created the below video which explains things a bit more and walks through setting up a syntax search that will locate fronted complements with a headword of λόγος — much like what occurs here in Mt 26.44.

Syntax Search Example: Two Words in the Same Word Group

A user commented on a recent post:

On the OpenText site, http://divinity.mcmaster.ca/OpenText/resources/articles/a8, Matthew Brook O’Donnell mentions the ability to find THEOS and AGAPE within the same word group. I have not been able to do that yet, probably because I can’t yet figure out the nesting structure I need in my search.
I wonder if you might demonstrate that or point me to one of your earlier tutorials where you have done something similar.

Since I haven’t blogged about syntax searches like this, and since there is a very cool technique using the Agreement dialogue that makes this sort of search (find two words in any order) fairly simple, I figured I’d do a screen recording video to show y’all how it works.

There are two searches detailed in the video. One answers the question with a very general search, the other searches a bit more specifically.