Adding RefTagger to a Blogger Blog

A few days ago someone asked if we would make it possible to use RefTagger on a Blogger blog. I was happy to let him know that RefTagger works very well with Blogger, and I explained to him two ways to get it up and running on his blog in just a couple of minutes.

It occurred to me that not everyone who has a blog is used to messing with code and editing template files, so I thought I’d do a brief tutorial here on the blog.

If you use Google’s Blogger and would like to add RefTagger to your site, here are two methods for setting it up.

Method 1: Adding a Page Element

Perhaps the simplest way for beginners to get RefTagger up and running is to add a page element. From your Blogger dashboard, click “Layout.” You’ll be taken by default to the “Page Elements” tab. Click “Add a Page Element” at the bottom of the page (not the one in the sidebar), and choose “HTML/JavaScript.” Leave the title blank, and paste in the customizable code that you get from the RefTagger page. Then click “Save.” Blogger should add the new page element to the bottom of your layout page automatically. If it appears in your sidebar, simply drag it to the very bottom of the footer. If you make any changes, make sure to save it before leaving the page.

When you’re done, your page should look something like this:

Method 2: Modifying Your Template File

The alternate method is to manually add the code before the closing body tag in your template file. From your Blogger dashboard, click “Layout.” Then click “Edit HTML.” Scroll all the way to the bottom of the code and paste in the customizable code that you get from the RefTagger page right before the closing body tag (i.e., right before </body>). Then click “Save Template.”

That’s it. RefTagger should now be up and running on your Blogger blog.

If you have any trouble or would like to see a tutorial for another blogging platform, leave a comment on this post or send an email to reftagger@logos.com.

Ibid., Footnotes, and the Auto-Lookup Feature

A comment on a recent blog post asked,

Concerning footnote text, when I am in a resource and move my cursor over a footnote, if it is a previously cited work, then the text shows up as "ibid." Is there any way to list the footnotes, so that I don’t have to go through the text to find the author of the citation?

Yes, in fact, there is a way to show all of the footnotes in a list. The Auto-Lookup feature should do the trick.

Sometimes you can just look at the previous footnote to find the source you’re looking for, but many times the previous footnote is a couple of pages earlier, and often you have to trace a trail of ibids before you finally find what it’s pointing to.

If you click a footnote only to see the infamous Ibid., there is an easier way to find the source behind it than looking at the previous footnotes. Simply right click anywhere on the page and select “Auto-Lookup.” The Auto-Lookup report will instantly show you a list of the text from the surrounding pop-ups like footnotes and Bible references.

So next time you run into ibids, look no further than the Auto-Lookup feature.

Linking Between Note Files and Other Documents

A question I get occasionally is how to link from note files to Word docs, PDFs, etc. Here’s a recent email from a friend:

My dad uses Logos in his personal Bible study, and he keeps his notes in the Logos notes files. He recently asked me if it was possible to link from Logos notes to Word or Excel files (and vice versa). Based on my playing around, I don’t see that capability, but though I’d shoot you an e-mail just in case you knew differently.

Since its not obvious how to do this, I thought I’d give a quick tutorial.

But before we get there, allow me to mention briefly how to link to Bibles and other resources in Libronix from your notes.

Linking to Bible Verses

Creating links to Bible verses in Logos note files is simple. Just type or paste in one or more Bible references and click the “Tag References As Hyperlinks” button (highlighted in the below image). Logos will automatically link them. Single clicking on any reference will open the passage in your default Bible.

Linking to Other Libronix Resources

You can easily create links to other Libronix resources as well. Type some text like “See the article in the NDT on Eschatology.” Open the resource to the location you’d like to link to. Next, select the portion of text that you’d like to be the hyperlink, and click the “Insert Reference” button (highlighted in the below image). Choose the appropriate location from the drop-down box, and check the box “Specific to this resource” if you’d like the link to open to the article on eschatology in the NDT rather than some other dictionary or encyclopedia. Finally, click “Insert.” You’re all set.

Linking to External Documents or Web Pages

There are two ways to link to external documents or web pages from a note file.

Option 1: Paste in the Location

The first way is to paste the file location or web address directly into the note file. Libronix will automatically turn it into a hyperlink. Clicking on the link will launch the page or file in your web browser.

Pasting in web addresses if straightforward. An example would be http://www.ccel.org/ccel/anselm/devotions.iii.iii.i.html. Pasting in the location to a local file may be less familiar to many of you. There are two things you need to remember: (1) you have to add the file protocol (i.e., file:///) in front of the location, and (2) you have to replace spaces with their HTML equivalent %20.

So if your file is located here: C:\Documents and Settings\pgons\My Documents\Sermons\Romans 8.28.pdf. You would want to past in file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/pgons/My%20Documents/Sermons/Romans%208.28.pdf. (You’ll notice that I changed the backwards slashes into forward slashes, but Libronix will recognize either way.)

Option 2: Create the Links in Word or Another Program

If you don’t want to have long, messy-looking links showing in your note files (like you see in the above image) and don’t want to remember how to create a link to a local file, this option might be the better solution for you. Simply create your note file in Word or a similar program (or paste it there from your note file), add your links to web pages and/or local files, and then paste your text back into your note file. While this does require an extra step or two, it allows you to hide your links behind text and more simply link to your local files.

Linking to Note Files

You can also link to Logos note files from Word docs, PDFs, and even from other note files. With your note file opened to the location you’d like to link to and the window selected, simply click “Copy Location to Clipboard.” You’ll find this under the “Favorites” menu. (You can also use the shortcut Alt+Ctrl+C.)

Then simply paste that link into Word or another program to create the hyperlink. Follow the steps in Option 2 above to link from one note file to another.

To learn more about linking and your Libronix library, see External Linking to Libronix Resources and Reports.

Understanding Data Types: Reference Data Types

Well, it’s about time to bring this series on data types to a close. It’s been a while since we talked about data types, so you might want to review by looking at some of the previous posts.

In this final post, we are going to look at reference data types and what they mean for more advanced studying and searching.

What Is a Reference Data Type?

To review, a reference data type is a scheme for referring to a location or range in a book (e.g., the Westminster Confession of Faith) or series of books (e.g., Barth’s Church Dogmatics).

The most common reference data type is the Bible (e.g, John 3:16). Others include Josephus (e.g, Antiquities 16.253), Philo (e.g., Hypothetica 11.18), the Apostolic Fathers (e.g., Ign Eph 2.2), Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion (e.g., IV, xvi, 3), the Book of Concord (e.g., Formula of Concord: Epitome, art. viii, par. 39), the Westminster Confession of Faith (e.g., Chapter XIX, 6), BDF (e.g., BDF §272), Louw and Nida (e.g., LN 58.73), the Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (e.g., no. 1768b), the Context of Scripture (e.g., COS 1.56), and Barth’s Kirchliche Dogmatic (e.g., KD I.1 p.352).

Since these and many other resources are data types, you (1) have greater control over what resources open when executing keylinks and (2) can perform very advanced searches in other books in your digital library that cite a particular data type.

Setting Up Keylink Targets for Reference Data Types

For each of these reference data types there may be more than one suitable keylink destination. For example, if you own the Apostolic Fathers in Greek and English (3 Editions, with Morphology), you can tell Libronix which version of the Apostolic Fathers to use when executing an Apostolic Fathers keylink (i.e., when looking up a reference in the Apostolic Fathers). You can even specify whether you’d like to see Greek or English by default.

To set up your preferred resources for various reference data types, go to Tools > Options > Keylink and select the appropriate data type from the drop-down menu.

Promote and prioritize the resources however you’d like.

Searching for Reference Data Types

There are several ways that you can perform advanced searches for reference data types.

1. Use the Right-Click Menu.

One way to search for a specific data type reference in another resource is to start in the resource that contains the reference that you want to search for and use the right-click menu. For example, if I’m at Calvin’s “Exposition of the Moral Law” in Book Two of his Institutes (i.e., II, viii), I can right click anywhere in that article and select “Search for References to II, viii.”

This will launch a library-wide search for other books in your library that cite this reference in Calvin’s Institutes. If you have a lot of books or know you want to search only a limited range of your resources, this is probably not the best way to do a search like this. What it does do for you, though, is provide you with the syntax for that search, which you can then use in a basic search. The syntax for this particular search is "cicr" in "II, viii".

2. Use the Basic Search.

To search a particular book or collection for a data type reference or range of references, you can use the basic search. The syntax is "data type" in "data type reference" (e.g., "Bible" in "John 3:16"). By using “in” your search will turn up ranges that include your reference. If you want to find the exact reference, use "data type" = "data type reference" (e.g., "Bible" = "John 3:16").

If you want to find all the places where a book or collection cites another resource, simple use the entire range of references in your search. Here are some examples:

  • "KD" in "Die Kirchliche Dogmatik I-IV"
  • "confess" in "The Confessions of St. Augustine, Book 1-13"
  • "cicr" in "I-IV"
  • "bible" in "Gen-Rev"

A search like "cicr" in "I-IV" in the Works of Van Til would allow you to use Van Til as a commentary of sorts on Calvin’s Institutes.

3. Use the Reference Browser.

If you don’t want to mess with hard-to-remember syntax, the Reference Browser makes performing searches like this even easier. Select (1) the book or collection you’d like to search, (2) the data type, (3) the reference or range to search for, and (4) whether to find the reference exactly or broader ranges that include that reference. If you are new to reference data type searching, the Reference Browser is definitely the best place to start.

Sometimes it can be difficult to know exactly what to enter into the Find box. Using the right-click menu as mentioned above or simply displaying the data type in the Active Index for the resource well help you figure this out.

4. Use the Passage Guide.

Finally, you can also use the Passage Guide to search one or more collections for Bible references. In the Passage Guide, select Properties and check the boxes next to any collections that you would like to have included in your Passage Guide search.

For more on searching for data types, see the article Exploring Logos Searching.

Other posts in this series:

Searching As a Kind of Visual Filter

The visual filters in Logos are very helpful. If you haven’t used them much, take a couple of minutes to check them out by going to View > Visual Filters. Notice that you can select to see the visual filters available for All Resources or a particular resource chosen from the drop-down box.

My favorite visual filters are the Morphology Filter (cf. here and here) and the Active Bible Reference (cf. here). Other filters include Page Numbers and Bible Reading Plans. The Andersen-Forbes Analyzed Text of the Hebrew Bible has special genre and source visual filters that are pretty cool.

The morphology filter allows you to markup certain words based on criteria that you define. For example, in the Greek NT you can mark up all indicative verbs or plural nouns. It works the same way in the Hebrew OT. You can create as many of these filters as you’d like, save them, and toggle them off and on as appropriate.

One of the benefits of the morphology filter is that it calls your attention to certain words as you work your way through the text. This is great for resources that contain morphological tagging, but what if you want certain English words to stand out as you read or skim through a portion of Scripture, a chapter in a book, or a journal article? While you can use the morphology filter to mark up up English words in the reverse interlinears, there isn’t a visual filter for marking up certain words or phrases in your average English books. You could do this manually with the visual markup tools, but this might not always be the most efficient way to accomplish what you want.

What I like to do when I want my eyes to catch certain words as I work through a text is to use searching as a sort of visual filter.

Let’s say I’m studying the doctrine of the Trinity and working through portions of Gunton’s The Promise of Trinitarian Theology. I want to note especially where Gunton mentions language of subordination. I’m not so much just looking for all the occurrences of the term as I am reading a chapter and wanting certain terms to stand out. So I run a search on subordin* and get an instant visual filter applied as I work through the text.

If I want several terms to stand out, I would simply run multiple searches or add all the search terms in the same search (e.g., subordin* OR trinit*). Logos conveniently highlights each search term with a different color.

Perhaps you’ll find this helpful in your own reading and research.

Field Searching: Searching by Author in the Theological Journals

So far in our field searching series we’ve covered searching OT quotes in the Greek NT, the words of Christ, and footnotes and surface text. Today I’d like to look at the author field in the Theological Journal Library.

The Theological Journal Library is a massive collection of 500 journals, each containing numerous articles. I was curious exactly how many articles, so I did some calculations. I came up with 8,421 articles containing an author field, which should be most of the articles. But this number doesn’t include book reviews and a few other things. Imagine trying to sort through 8,421 articles in 500 print journals to find a specific article by a specific author! Thanks to Libronix, that’s an easy task. Thanks to the author field, it’s even easier.

When you know who the author of the article is and perhaps not much else, you can easily locate all of the articles by that author and find the exact one you’re looking for in no time. Simple use author: followed by the name of the author.

Let’s say you’re looking for all of the articles written by Dan Wallace, author of the popular Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics. There are a couple of ways you can go about this. It’s often sufficient to use just the author’s last name. So you could search for author:Wallace to find all the articles with the word Wallace in the author field. That search yields 23 hits. In this case, though, last name isn’t enough to give you only articles written by Daniel B. Wallace. You’ll also get some hits for articles written by Paul W. Wallace, Peter J. Wallace, and Wallace Benn.

You could try author:"Daniel B. Wallace", but that wouldn’t return any hits for "Daniel Wallace" without the middle initial or "Dan Wallace." In this case, it’s not an issue, since his name appears the same way in every article, but that’s not the case with many authors. Walt Russell is a perfect example of this. Sometimes his name appears "Walt Russell," sometimes "Walter B. Russell," sometimes "Walter B. Russell III," and still other times "Walter Bo Russell, III."

To get the best results, you will usually not want to do a quote search. I’d recommend using the individual’s last name and the shortest form of his first name followed by an asterisk. So I’d search for all Walter Russell articles with author:russell author:walt* in the same search. A search for all Daniel Wallace articles (author:wallace author:dan*) would look like this:

Not only is this a handy way to find a specific article you’re looking for when you don’t have a precise title, but it’s also a great way to explore the writings and theology of a particular individual or build a bibliography for a biographical paper you’re writing.

For more on field searching, see these previous posts:

Diagramming Galatians

Terry Cook, one of our users and a regular in our newsgroups, just completed a project that he’s been working on for the last 23 months: diagramming the Greek text of the entire letter of Paul to the Galatians.

He’s annotated his diagrams with grammatical notes, including insights from some of the major Greek grammars available in Libronix. He has grouped his diagrams into these six sections following the major paragraph breaks of the NA27:

  • Galatians 1
  • Galatians 2
  • Galatians 3:1-4:7
  • Galatians 4:8-5:1
  • Galatians 5:2-26
  • Galatians 6

I asked Terry if he’d mind if we made his work available to you, our blog readers, and he said that he would be very happy to share it.

To view these diagrams in Libronix, you’ll need to download this zip file, extract the six files, and put them in your \My Documents\Libronix DLS\SentenceDiagrams folder. If the SentenceDiagrams folder does not exist, simply create it from the File menu or right-click menu.

Then, with Libronix opened, go to File > Open (or Ctrl + O), select Sentence Diagrams from the Types column and one of the diagrams from the Documents column.

Here’s an example of his diagram of Galatians 5:17.

Download them, and give them a look. Perhaps Terry’s work will inspire you to start doing some diagramming of your own!

Field Searching: Searching Footnotes and Surface Text

Since we’ve been looking at some of the various fields that you can search in Libronix resources, like OTQuote, DisputedPassage, and LaterAddition in the Greek New Testament and WordsOfChrist (or WOC) in most English Bibles that include the New Testament, I figured I’d continue this little series and mention some of the other fields that you can search.

A field that most books have that you may find helpful in your searching is the footnotes field. You can search footnote text in isolation from the rest of the text of the book by using Footnote: prior to the word or phrase you are searching for (e.g., Footnote:Packer).

Footnotes usually contain more detailed information with bibliographic citations and additional sources for further study. You might find it helpful to search the footnotes of a book to find more books and articles about a topic you’re studying. Not all books include a bibliography at the end, so searching the footnotes with certain key words might give you some great leads to dig deeper.

Another place this might be helpful is in the ESV English-Greek Reverse Interlinear New Testament. The search Footnote:NA27 turns up 151 mentions of the NA27 in the footnotes showing the places where the underlying Greek of the ESV differs from the NA27 text. If you wanted to find all the places where that variation involves θεος, for example, you could search for Footnote:θεος, which turns up 4 places where the ESV Greek text follows a different reading from the NA27 either adding or omitting θεος.

Alternatively, if you ever wanted to exclude footnotes from your searches, many of our books support a Surface field. So a search for Surface:Barth, for example, would ignore any hits in the footnotes.

To see what fields are supported for a given resources, look in "About This Resource," which you can access from the right-click menu in My Library.

You can also access "About This Resource" by clicking click Help > About This Resource with a resource opened and selected.

Here’s an example of the supported fields for The Theology of the Christian Life in J. I. Packer’s Thought.

More field search examples coming soon.

Field Searching: Searching the Words of Christ

I mentioned in yesterday’s blog post that you can search specific fields like OTQuote, DisputedPassage, and LaterAddition in the NA27 and UBS4 editions of the Greek New Testament. Another field that you might find helpful in your English Bible searches is WordsOfChrist (or WOC for short). You can use WOC searches in most versions of the Bible that cover the New Testament.

A search for WOC:Father in the ESV yields 236 hits. If we want to see only the places that refer to God the Father (i.e., Father vs. father), we would use WOC:case(Father). We could also use WOC:exact(Father) to omit any potential references to the plural "Fathers" (perhaps at the beginning of a sentence), but in this case there aren’t any so the results are the same either way. (To learn more about search modifiers like case() and exact(), see the Searching section of the Libronix Help Manual and this article on searching.)

We can then graph the results and see that by far the majority of Jesus’ references to His Father occur in John.

This is certainly an important aspect of John’s theology of Jesus as the Son of God. Another search of the words of Christ (woc:nostem("son of god")) shows that the only gospel that records Jesus referring to Himself as the Son of God is John.

If we search for all of the words of Christ in the ESV (WOC:*), we get 40,411 hits in 2,042 verses. If we graph the results, we get this.

This information is sure to come in handy for any serious study on the teachings of Jesus.

Field Searching: Searching OT Quotes in the Greek NT

Did you know that you can limit your searches in the Greek New Testament to the portions that are considered by the editors to be quotations from the Old Testament? In the Logos editions of the NA27 and UBS4, we’ve added special tagging for all the text that appears in the print editions as quotations from the OT. In the NA27, these quotations are designated by italics, in UBS4 by bold.

Simply put the search term OTQuote: in front of the word or phrase you want to search for (e.g., OTQuote:κυριος). Libronix will limit the search to just the OT quotation text. A search in the NA27 for OTQuote:θεος, for example, yields 69 occurrences (compared to 1317 in the entire NT).

Another interesting thing you can do is find all of the OT quotations. Just run the search OTQuote:*. It yields 4662 hits in the NA27. Keep in mind that this is the number of Greek words, not the number of quotations. If we graph these results by number of hits per book, we get this.

So Acts, Matthew, Hebrews, and Romans are the top four. If we graph the results by percentage, we get these results.

The top four by percentage are Hebrews, 1 Peter, Romans, and Galatians.

By the way, there are two other fields that you can search within: DisputedPassage and LaterAddition (e.g., DisputedPassage:κυριος or LaterAddition:κυριος). Disputed passages are indicated by [single square brackets] (e.g., Gal 1:6). Portions of text that the editors consider to be later additions are wrapped in [[double square brackets]] (e.g., John 7:53-8:11).