Is Camp Logos Worth It?

For over 17 years, I’ve had the privilege of training users to better use Logos Bible Software through live seminars called Camp Logos. I’m often asked if it’s worth the investment of time and money to attend. As objectively as possible, I’d like to answer that question.

An investment that pays dividends

Yes, Camp Logos is worth the investment for several reasons. The training is:

  • Systematic: Rather than discovering unrelated features here or there on your own, you’ll see the big picture of the software as I guide you through Logos tools in a logical sequence.
  • Concentrated: Usually at the office or home we’re juggling meetings, emails, phone calls, and more. But at Camp, you can come away and focus on Logos. With fewer distractions, you can learn in a few days what would take weeks, months, or even years to discover on your own.
  • Interactive: The question-and-answer aspect of the live seminar adds to the learning experience. You’ll get your questions answered—whether during the main sessions or breaks.
  • Inspiring: Learning with fellow believers who are committed to Bible study, teaching, preaching, and Logos is contagious. You’ll leave Camp with your head full and your heart stirred.
  • Practical: As a Logos user and Bible teacher myself, I’ll not only show you how to use Logos features, but also how to implement them into your personal study and sermon or lesson preparation.

So yes, Camp Logos is a wise investment of time and resources that will pay immediate dividends.

Get ready for Camp

During April–May, Camp Logos is coming to:

  • Dallas, TX: May 5–7
  • St Louis, MO area: May 12–14
  • New Orleans, LA: May 18–20

Or, join us on June 24-26 for National Camp Logos at Logos headquarters in Bellingham, WA.

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If you can’t attend a live seminar or live outside the United States, you can purchase Camp Logos Video Training as a downloadable Logos resource. Get a great price on Pre-Pub right now!

Logos Pro—How to Cut Down Your Prep Time with Inline Search

When I was in full-time ministry, I had to preach or teach as many as three times a week. I was committed to making every single sermon and lesson based on careful exegesis of God’s Word. That meant paying careful attention to the original languages.

But when you’re preparing that much material in a given week, switching between all those resources can really drain away the time you could be using to get to the meat of a biblical text. Being really thorough means scouring mammoth volumes for every occurrence of a word or phrase in the original language.

I love studying the Bible, but with so many responsibilities, I’m always looking for ways to cut down on my prep time and get to the meaning of a passage, faster.

Inline Search makes it easier

Recently I sat down with Todd Bishop, one of our Logos Pros. He showed me that with Logos 6, I can search the underlying Greek or Hebrew without ever leaving my English Bible. Watch Todd show you how it’s done:


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Power your search with these resources

To get the most out of Logos 6 and Inline Search, you need a library full of top-notch resources. I asked Todd what he recommends. Here are his top choices:

    • Biblia Hebraica—the definitive edition of the Hebrew Bible.
    • Nestle-Aland 28—If Biblia Hebraica is the definitive Hebrew Bible, Nestle-Aland is the go-to Greek New Testament. Chances are, you already have both of these resources on your shelf, but if you want to search them the way Todd’s shown you, add them to your Logos library.
    • Lexham Hebrew-English Interlinear Bible—If you want the kind of rich mark-up you saw in the video above, you need something like the Lexham Hebrew-English Interlinear Bible in your library. This resource reveals the original languages hidden beneath the English translation.
    • Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (BECNT)—Todd says you can even perform an Inline Search in your commentaries. One of my personal favorites is BECNT—one of the most respected scholarly, evangelical commentaries out there.

Get started with Inline Search today!

Inline Search is included in the Logos 6 Core Engine. But to get the most out of this tool, I recommend Logos 6 Bronze or higher. Get started with Logos 6 and the Factbook now.

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Logos 6: How to Use and Hide Auto Bookmarks

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A fellow Logos user recently sent me this inquiry:

As I’m navigating through resources, I notice hash marks in the scroll bar area. What are they? Can I hide them?

Officially they’re called Auto Bookmarks and, yes, they may be hidden.

Think of the Auto Bookmarks as the “dog ears” we make on pages in print editions. We dog ear a page so we can easily return to it. Logos automatically dog ears locations for us in our resources. These dog ears or Auto Bookmarks are basically the recent history in a resource.

For Example:

  • Open your preferred Bible
  • Notice the hash marks in the scroll bar area (A)

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  • Rest the cursor on a hash mark to preview a previous location you’ve visited in the Bible (B)

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  • Click the hash mark to jump to the location (C)

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To hide Auto Bookmarks:

  • Chose Tools | Program Settings (D)
  • Set Show Auto and Favorite Bookmarks in the General section to No (E)

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Please note, selecting No does not erase the Auto Bookmarks, but merely hides them(F). In the future, if you select Yes, all of the previous Auto Bookmarks will return.

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For more Logos training check out our video resource Camp Logos 1. And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Logos Pro Training: Mastering the Factbook

Logos 6’s Factbook gives you instant information on biblical topics. This tool functions like an encyclopedia, pulling together all the datasets and resources from your library, then presenting powerful overviews of each topic. For example, search “Tabernacle” in the Factbook and get a list of media, key verses, lemmas, senses, dictionary links, and topic suggestions for deeper study.

I break it all down for you in the video below.

Power the Factbook with these resources

As you can see, the Factbook is pretty awesome, but to get the most out of it, you need some resources that capitalize on its functionality. That’s why we put together the Factbook Collection—22 volumes that will transform your Factbook into a biblical and theological powerhouse. To get the best possible value, pick up the entire Factbook collection. It includes:

Start using the Factbook today

The Factbook is included in Logos 6 Starter and above, but to get the most out of this robust tool, I recommend Logos 6 Bronze or higher. Get started with Logos 6 and the Factbook now.

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Logos 6: Copy Highlighted Text to a Word Document

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A very common question I get is exemplified in this recent email inquiry from a Logos user:

Is there a way to copy and paste the biblical text into a Word document and maintain the highlights I’ve added?

The short answer is this: some highlights easily copy and paste, while others do not.

For example:

  • Open any Bible to any location
  • Choose Tools | Highlighting
  • Select some text in the Bible (A)
  • Expand the Solid Colors palette (B)
  • Select the Green Foreground style (C)

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  • Notice the selected text in the Bible turns green (D)

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  • Copy and paste the green highlighted text into a Word document
  • Notice the green highlighted text is maintained in the Word document (E)

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  • Select some additional text in the Bible (F)
  • Expand the Highlighter Pens palette (G)
  • Select the Green Highlighter style (H)

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  • Notice the selected text in the Bible is highlighted in green (I)

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  • Copy and paste the green highlighted text into a Word document
  • Notice the green highlighted text is NOT maintained in the Word document (J)

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What’s the difference in the above two scenarios?

Simply put, in the first example, we changed the character formatting on the text itself (turned it green). In the second, we basically added an image (green natural highlighter) to the text. Character formatting carries over in the copy–paste process; images do not.

So if you need Logos highlights in a Word document, use the Logos-provided styles that emphasize character formatting.

When you create your own styles, focus on the Font Styling (K) and Insert Text (L) sections that emphasize character formatting, including:

  • Font
  • Font size
  • Text color
  • Bold
  • Italics
  • Small caps
  • Large caps
  • Superscript
  • Subscript
  • Inserted text before or after the resource text

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All of the above characteristics are maintained as you copy and paste highlighted resource text from Logos to a Word document.

For more detailed instructions on creating your own highlighting styles, check out the Logos 6 Training Manual: Volume 2, which is part of the Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2 bundle.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Free Training Webinar: Basic Logos Navigation

Webinar_FB_AD_1200x628Every couple weeks, we host a free training webinar to help you harness the full potential and draw the greatest value out of your investment in Logos Bible Software.

So far, we’ve plumbed the depths of Logos search, explored how Logos can aid you in counseling prep, and pulled back the curtain on the High Definition Commentary series.

Most recently, we went back to the basics—reviewing the fundamentals of Logos navigation. Along the way, we also offered a great deal: 30% off the products we used in the demonstrations.

Want in on those deals? Watch the recording to get the coupon code:

We’re planning the next round of training webinars to help you master the world’s most powerful Bible study software. Be the first to about them: sign up for email updates below!





 
In the meantime, you can watch all of our previous training events: head to Logos.com/Webinar-Archive for the full lineup.

Logos 6: See All the Places an Event Is Mentioned in Scripture

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Oftentimes a biblical event is not only mentioned in its original context, but also elsewhere in Scripture. For example, the Israelites being fed with manna is recorded in Exodus 16, but John 6:31 also alludes to it. The fall of Jericho occurs in Joshua 6, but it’s also referenced in Hebrews 11:30.

To thoroughly study an event, we can investigate every reference to it in the Bible. Logos makes that investigation easier with a Factbook report.

Try this as an example:

  • Choose Tools | Factbook
  • Type red sea in the reference box (A)
  • Select The Israelites cross the Red Sea from the drop-down list (B)

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  • Notice a Factbook report is generated for that event (C)
  • Navigate to the Passages section in the report (D)
  • Observe the Key Verses subsection, which displays Exodus 14:15–31 in which the event originally took place (E)
  • Notice the See Also subsection which lists other verses in which the event is referenced (F)

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  • Click Open 20 passages in preferred Bible to display only the above verses in your preferred Bible (G)

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With the above steps, you can easily see and study all passages related to a biblical event in one location!

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Camp Logos 1.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Free Desktop Training: Learn from the Logos Pros!

LogosPro_blogI’m Todd, one of the Logos Pros at Faithlife. I’m part of a team of expert Logos trainers whose goal it is to educate and empower you with Logos Bible Software so that you can do better Bible study.

I’m excited to announce that Logos is offering free training for the desktop app. Each week, we’ll walk you through a new video tutorial from one of the Logos Pros teaching you how to master Logos’ tools and resources. You’ll learn to navigate lexicons in Logos, use the Passage Guide for in-depth research, consult cross-references in ancient literature, and much more.

Check back here every week for a new video! Or, get these videos delivered straight to your inbox—sign up for weekly email updates with free training:





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We want to learn from you, too! Share your favorite Logos tips or any questions you might have by shooting us an email at logospro@faithlife.com or leaving them in the comments below.

Logos 6: Quickly Mark Up Similar Words in a Passage

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A good friend recently emailed me explaining that while studying Philippians in the ESV, he noticed the words persecutor in Philippians 3:6 and press in Philippians 3:12 and Philippians 3:14 were all the same Greek lemma. He then asked if there was an easy way to automatically obtain a lemma count as well as highlight the same lemmas in a passage.

The answer? Yes.

The word list document type provides a lemma count, while a visual filter automatically highlights the text. In this post, however, I want to show you how to utilize a search to quickly highlight the same or similar lemmas in a passage.

  • Open the ESV to Philippians 3:1, where Paul cautions against legalism (A)
  • Right click on the word persecutor in Philippians 3:6 (B)
  • Select the lemma dioko from the context menu (C)
  • Select Search this resource (D)

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  • Make sure the verse range is set to an option, such as the New Testament, which includes Philippians (E)

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  • Notice that Logos highlights the active search results in a peachy color, which shows (as my friend pointed out) that persecutor in Philippian 3:6 and press in Philippians 3:12 and Philippians 3:14 are all highlighted because they’re all the same Greek lemma (F)

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You can, of course, execute additional right-click searches for other lemmas.

As you generate new searches, Logos opens new search panels and highlights those active results in the same peachy color. The result is that you may end up with 10 search panels open (G) and a lot of peachy words in the biblical text (H).

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To prevent new search panels from opening:

  • Choose the panel menu on the original search panel (I)
  • Select Send searches here (J)
  • Notice that Logos places a target on the search-panel menu (K)—now when you execute new right-click searches, the new results replace the existing results in the same search panel

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The lemma or dictionary form of a word is the same Hebrew or Greek word, regardless of its specific construction. In other words, the lemma may be a verb and searching for that lemma finds all occurrences of the verb whether its tense is present, aorist, subjunctive, etc.

Let’s say, however, that a word has both a noun and verb form. Searching for the lemma will not locate both. A lemma search is restricted to one part of speech.

To locate lemmas that are similar, but not the same, search for the root:

  • Right click the word perfect in Philippians 3:12 (L)
  • Select the root telos from the context menu (M)
  • Select Search this resource (N)

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  • Notice that the words perfect (verb in Philippians 3:12), mature (adjective in Philippians 3:15), and end (noun in Philippians 3:19) are all highlighted because they are similar lemmas sharing the same root (O)

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Try this root search with joy in Philippians 1:4, and notice how many peachy words appear!

This quick way of searching and temporarily highlighting words in a passage can be very useful in the observation phase of Bible study. Sometimes it reveals themes or repeated subjects such as joygospel, and service in Philippians.

However, please note a couple observations:

  • The same lemma in different contexts may have different meanings.
  • Just because lemmas may share the same root does not automatically imply those lemmas share similar meanings.

Use this post to help with observation, but always move into the interpretation phase of Bible study to answer the questions raised during observation.

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Camp Logos 1.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Logos 6: Attach the Same Note to Different Places

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

As you well know, the same biblical events are often mentioned in multiple places in the Bible. For example, Jesus’ prayer in Gethsemane is recorded in Matthew, Mark, and Luke.

Let’s imagine we’re working our way through Mark when we come to the phrase “this cup” in Mark 14:36. We want to record our insights, so we create a note for Mark 14:36. During our research, however, we discover this same phrase also appears in Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42. Rather than creating two more separate notes, we can actually attach the same original note to the other two verses with a feature known as an attachment point.

Here’s how to get started with this power-user trick:

First, create the original note:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the file something like “Notes on the Gospels” (A)
  • Make sure the view is set to Full (B)

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  • Open a Bible to Mark 14:36
  • Right click any word in Mark 14:36 (C)
  • Select Mark 14:36 from the context menu (D)
  • Select Add a note to “Notes on the Gospels” (E)

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  • Notice Logos creates, in the file, an individual note named “Mark 14:36” (F) with a Content box underneath it (G)

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  • Type your research in the Content box—for example, The demonstrative pronoun “this” implies nearness or being close at hand. (H)

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  • Notice Logos places a note indicator in the Bible next to Mark 14:36 (I)

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  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to see a pop-up preview of the note content (J)

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Next, add the attachment points:

  • Rest the cursor on the name of the note, “Mark 14:36” (K)

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  • Click the arrow link that appears to the far right of the note (L)
  • Select Edit attachment points (M)

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  • Type Matthew 26:39 in the reference box (N)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (O)

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  • Type Luke 22:42 in the reference box (P)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (Q)

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  • Click Done to close the attachment-points box (R)

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  • Navigate to Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42 in the Bible and notice a note indicator next to each verse (S)

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Now regardless of which account of Jesus’ prayer you’re reading, you’ll have your insights about “this cup” right there with you!

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.