Master the 15 Document Types: Part 2

Logos 5’s documents menu gives you 11 different document types (and Documents.Logos.com reveals four more). Each one works a little differently, so you’ll always have the right tool for the job.

Last week we explored the first five; this week we’ll tackle the remaining ten.

To see examples of all 15 document types, join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife group.

6. Reading plan

Logos scores top marks as a research tool. Tagging powers some of the most useful searching available anywhere. Tools like Clause Search and the Bible Word Study eliminate thousands of hours spent flipping pages and scanning book indexes.

But if you’d like to read a book from cover to cover, Logos performs just as admirably, thanks to the reading-plan document type. Construct a reading plan for any book in your library on a schedule that fits your lifestyle. Reading plans are especially helpful on devotionals, like the one below that I built for Lent based on 40 Days to the Cross: Reflections from Great Thinkers.

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7. Sentence diagram

If, like many, you learned sentence diagramming on the first day of your hermeneutics class, you’ll love this document type. Import a passage in either an English translation or its original language, and use a huge set of tools to chart your way through the text. I particularly love the pencil tool, which interprets my squiggles into perfectly straight lines.

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8. Word-find puzzle

It’s not all hard work in the documents menu—the word-find puzzle turns a Scripture passage into an brain-expanding mental exercise that’s more a game than a study tool. It’s easy to use, and it’s great for the moments when you need to look up from your study and catch your breath. And if you teach a children’s Sunday school class, these puzzles will be a big hit!

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Note: These next two types—syntax search & visual filters—represent the overlap between the documents menu and your search tools. Both are search types that can be saved for later use or shared with others on Documents.Logos.com.

9. Syntax search

Find Syntax Search—a powerful language tool that empowers you to find particular sentence structures in Scripture—under the search menu. But since these searches are complex and take longer than usual to construct, you can also save your search parameters as a document.

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10. Visual filter

Perform a real-time search in the text of your Bible using a visual filter. You can create visual filters, then turn them on or off using the display menu (which looks like a Venn diagram) whenever you have a Bible open.

In the example below, I’ve created a visual filter that highlights all the imperative verbs, drawing attention to the call to action at the end of Peter’s sermon in Acts 2. I started with a new filter (created from the documents menu), switched over to “morph” search and typed an “@” in the search box. Logos suggested various parts of speech for me to choose from. I chose verb, and Logos suggested various tenses, voices, moods, and so on. I chose the imperative mood. In the final step, I chose the “On Fire” style for Logos to mark imperative verbs.

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11. Word list

Good Bible scholars spend hours tabulating the number of times a word is used in a particular passage. But a word-list document will do that for you in three clicks.

With a Bible and new word list open side by side, just highlight the passage you’re studying, and choose to “add from selected text.” From there, you can drag the various columns up to group the entire list according to that criteria.

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NOTE: These last four types do not appear in the documents menu, but you may see them on Documents.Logos.com.

12. Presentation

Your Proclaim presentations are stored and can be shared through Documents.Logos.com. If you haven’t used Proclaim, you can try it free for 30 days!

13. Resource collection

Create custom resource collections to quickly search subsections of your library. These subsections are then stored as resource collections on Documents.Logos.com, so you can share them with others.

A team from the Logos forums has created resource collections for virtually every denomination and belief tradition and made them available through their Faithlife group. You can benefit from their hard work right now!

And if you like that, you may also enjoy the Logos Author Collections group.

14. Guide template

Logos comes with five powerful done-for-you guides that search sections of your library with the right tools for the type of study you’re doing.

In addition to these five, you can create your own guides, mixing and matching tools suit your study needs. For example, I have a guide that searches all of my collections grouped by author, so I can quickly get an overview of what particular scholars have to say about a subject or passage. I have another guide that searches my collections grouped by denomination, so I can get an overview of how different faith traditions handle a subject or passage.

15. Highlighting palette

Logos comes loaded with several highlighting palettes, but you may prefer to create your own—perhaps matching the colors you’ve used for years in your favorite paper Bible. Your custom highlighting palette becomes a document that you can share with others on Documents.Logos.com.

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Get a Logos 5 base package today and get access to thousands of Bible study resources, plus powerful study tools like these 15 document types.

To see examples of each document type, join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife group.

Webinar Recap: Streamline Your Sermon Preparation

logos-5-webinar-free-trainingLast week, in a webinar hosted by Logos expert Todd Bishop, we outlined some key steps in assisting you with your sermon preparation using Logos 5.

Todd shared ways to create custom layouts that are easy to use and navigate. He also demonstrated how to manage your workspace to match your work preferences and explained how to save your shortcuts to your most-used workspaces so you can easily access them later.

If you missed the webinar, don’t worry! You can still watch the recording anytime you want and learn about streamlining your sermon preparation from this training session:

During this webinar, we featured the Tim Keller Sermon Archive, which includes 1,233 sermons covering Keller’s preaching from 1989 to 2011.  When integrated into your digital library, these transcripts are enhanced by amazing functionality.

We’re planning additional virtual training events like this. Let us know via Facebook or Twitter what type of training you’d like to see!

Logos 5: Exploring Lemmas with the Same Root

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently presented this question to me:

I’ve noticed Logos includes the root words for Greek lemmas in English Bibles with the reverse interlinear. How might these root words be used in actual Bible study?

Excellent question! While this blog post will certainly not exhaust all that could be said, hopefully a few insights may get you started using this tool.

First, let’s begin with a few definitions

  • The manuscript form of a word refers to the actual word the biblical author used.
  • The lemma or lexical form of a word refers to how the word is “looked up” or referenced in a traditional dictionary of lexicon.
  • The root is the word from which the lemma is derived.

In very simple terms, manuscript forms are derived from lemmas, which are derived from roots.

Let’s explore this more with a specific biblical example found in Galatians 6:1, in which Paul instructs: 

. . . if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness . . .

  • Open the ESV to Galatians 6:1 (A)
  • Right click the word restore (B)
  • Select Root | Search this resource (C)

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  • Click Aligned in the search panel (D) to see in a center column the various ways different lemmas with the same root are translated in English (E)

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  • Click Analysis to display a spreadsheet of the results (F)
  • Right click on a column header (G)
  • Select at least these categories: Reference, Lemma (Greek), Result, and Sense (please note that Sense does not appear in all Logos base packages) (H)

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  • Drag one at a time Lemma (Greek) and Sense to the top of the spreadsheet (I) in order to group the results according to these categories (J)

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Here’s what you’re viewing in the spreadsheet:

  • The various NT Greek lemmas derived from the same root (K)
  • The various ways the lemmas are translated in the ESV (L)
  • The sense or contextual meaning of each lemma (M)
  • Different senses or meanings for the same lemma (N)

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As you work with these results please keep these cautions in mind:

  • Don’t automatically assume a lemma has the exact same meaning as its root
  • Don’t automatically assume lemmas derived from the same root share the same meaning
  • Don’t automatically assume a lemma has the exact same meaning in every place it occurs in Scripture

With these cautions firmly in mind, it’s interesting to observe that running throughout the related lemmas are the ideas of repaircorrectprepareequip, and mature. Perhaps these lemmas and meanings provide further insights into the concept of restoring in Galatians 6:1.

By combining a search for the root and the Analysis view of the results, you can explore in detail the various facets of a word!

If this was helpful to you, check out our other training materials to help you master your Logos software.

Master the 15 Document Types: Part 1

Note-taking remains central to both personal Bible study and sermon preparation. Whether you’re journaling through the New Testament in your daily devotions, preparing to lead a small group, or doing research for your dissertation, Logos offers powerful, intuitive note-taking tools to improve every facet of your Bible study.

The documents menu in Logos 5 gives you 11 different document types (and Documents.Logos.com reveals four more). Each one works a little differently, so you’ll always have the right tool for the job.

To demonstrate the power of these documents, we created a Faithlife Group with samples of each document type—join right now to see them all!

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There are also four other document types that don’t appear in this menu, but may appear at Documents.Logos.com. Over the next two weeks, we’ll explore the capabilities of each—starting today with the first six types listed in the documents menu.

1. Bibliography

Logos 5 makes it easy to create, edit, sort, and print (or export) bibliographies for publication or personal reference. You can add citations from seven source types (I use “history” most often).

Students, rejoice—if you build a bibliography in MLA only to learn that your professor expects Turabian, don’t worry—you can switch between styles with a click.

Exporting or printing a bibliography is easy, too: just click the panel menu or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl/Command + P.

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2. Clippings

When you come across an insight you want to remember, turn to clippings—the fastest way to store definitions, ideas, observations, and other fragments of text.

It’s easy: create a new clippings document, then right click text to set it aside for later. The clippings document will remember exactly where you found everything, so you can cite all your sources. You can even add tags (to make clippings searchable) and notes.

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3. Notes

Logos’ notes make it easy to mark up your books. Just like writing in the margins, you can add your own thoughts and observations to personalize every book in your library—except in Logos notes, you’ll never run out of writing room.

Notes and clippings are very similar. Personally, I use clippings to gather insights from my library into one place while I study or prepare to preach. I use notes to store a searchable copy for a final product—like a sermon manuscript, a completed article, or a position paper.

Notes attached to Scripture references will place an inline icon across all your devices. Hover over it to preview the note, and click to open it.

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4. Passage list

This is the most helpful document when you’re studying systematically through a single topic or theme. Use search to find all the references of a specific word or phrase, and store the results for analysis.

The passage list really shines when you toggle over to memorization mode—you can use it to memorize a list of verses by progressively hiding more words as you become more familiar with the text.

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5. Prayer list

Prayer lists help you keep your promises to pray for friends or family. You can add requests, set the frequency, and share your lists in a Faithlife Group or at Documents.Logos.com. You can even record answers, so you’ll always have a record of God’s faithfulness in your life.

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Join the Logos Sample Documents Faithlife Group to see more examples of all 15 document types.

We’ll cover the remaining document types next week—stay tuned for part 2!

Logos 5: Reorder Books in a Collection

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In a recent blog post about displaying a verse from all Bibles, I suggested creating a collection of English Bibles. This suggestion in turn generated some discussion about the order of books in a collection. If you’ve created a collection from the Tools menu, you’ve noticed that Logos alphabetizes the resources in a collection.

To illustrate, in a theology-books collection, Baker’s Dictionary of Practical Theology appears before Concise Theology because B is of course before C (A).

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When using this collection, therefore, in a search, the Baker results appear before the Concise hits (B).

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The question then is, how can we move the Concise ahead of the Baker yet leave them both in the collection? The answer is: rename Concise. This method is a little tedious, but it does accomplish the goal.

  • Click the Library icon
  • Click the Resource information icon on the library’s toolbar (C)
  • Type title:theology in the library’s Find box to display resources with theology in the title (D)
  • Click something other than the title of Concise Theology in the viewing area (E) to display the book in the Resource information pane (F)
  • Click the Edit (pencil) icon next to the title in the Resource information pane (G)
  • Type the numeral 1 in front of the title in the Edit box so the name of the book is now 1 Concise Theology (H)

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  • Press the Enter key to save the name
  • Repeat this process with other theology books using the numerals 2, 3, 4 etc. (I)

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  • Close the Library
  • Choose Tools | Collections
  • Name the collection Theology Books (J)
  • In the Rule box, type title:theology to list resources with theology in the title (K)
    (Please note: this is not a complete rule to locate all theology books, but used just for illustration purposes.)
  • Notice that the resources with numbers in their names are now at the top of the list (L)

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To see this newly ordered collection in action, generate a basic search in Theology Books and notice which books appear at the top of the list! (M)

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Of course, you can use this same method to reorder books in any collection, such as History Books, Ethics Books, or others. This method ensures that your favorite books always appear at the top of your search results.

Logos 5: Locate Words and Phrases in Proximity to One Another

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In addition to coaching people in the use of Logos Bible Software, one of my greatest joys is encouraging biblical communicators toward true expository preaching. Exposing the original intent of a scriptural passage along with contemporary application is a powerful combination!

Toward that end, a Logos user recently asked me how he could search his library for various definitions of expository preaching.

This is an excellent question that can be answered with a proximity search combining words and phrases:

  • Open the Search panel (A)
  • Select Basic as the search type (B)
  • Select Entire Library from the resources drop-down list (C)
  • Type this text in the Find box: (definition,define) WITHIN 3 words “expository preaching” (D)

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  • Choose the search panel menu (E)
  • Select Match all word forms (F)

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  • Press the Enter key to generate the search results (G)

The search query instructs Logos to locate all the occurrences of the words define, defines, defined, defining, definition, or definitions within three words of the phrase expository preaching!

Clicking a hyperlinked search result opens the resource right to an author’s definition of expository preaching. (H)

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Here are some details regarding the search query:

  • The parentheses group terms together
  • The comma within the parentheses represents an OR search, meaning any of the terms present constitutes a hit
  • Match all word forms locates the various forms of define, saving us from having to type them individually
  • The double quotes around the words expository preaching indicate an exact phrase
  • The command WITHIN means the words can appear before or after the phrase
  • The term words designates the context in which the words and phrases must appear
  • The number 3 defines the specific contextual range in which the words and phrases must appear

Please experiment with this query, because joining the proximity search with words and phrases enables us to locate information with precision.

If this was helpful to you, check out our Logos 5 Training Manual Set, which contains greatly expanded explanations of Logos searching.

Logos 5: Cross‑References for Topics

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

One of the most popular types of Bible study enjoyed by many Christians is cross-reference work. Toward that end, most English Bibles provide some cross-references inline with the biblical text.

If you enjoy this method of Bible investigation, you may find that those embedded cross-references are limited. So if you’d like to look up more biblical references for a given topic, try this setup that incorporates several Logos features:

  • Click the Library icon to open your electronic bookshelf (A)
  • Click Prioritize in the upper right corner of the library (B)

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  • Type nave in the Library’s Find box (C)
  • Drag New Nave’s Topical Bible to the Prefer these resources list (make sure this resource is in the top five of your topical prioritized books, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias) (D)

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  • Open an English Bible, such as The Lexham English Bible (E)
  • Navigate in the Bible to a passage containing a topic of interest, such as Colossians 2:14 (F)

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  • Right click on a word in the verse, such as cross (G)
  • Click Selection: cross on the right side of the context menu (H)
  • Select New Nave’s Topical Bible on the left side of the context menu (I)

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  • Notice this resource opens to an article containing numerous cross-references for the topic cross (J)
  • Rest the cursor on a blue Bible cross-reference to see a popup of that verse from your preferred Bible (K)

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  • Click a blue Bible cross-reference to open your preferred Bible to that verse

To see multiple cross-references at once, add this to your study:

  • Choose Tools | Power Lookup
  • Select some text containing cross-references in Nave’s (L)
  • Notice that Power Lookup displays the biblical text for all of those selected cross-references (M)

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If you find yourself using this setup frequently, make sure to save it as layout.

For more helpful instruction about Logos tools, please check out the two-volume Logos 5 Training Manual Set.

Logos 5: Display a Verse from All Bibles

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Recently I was reading Revelation 3:20 in the ESV, where Jesus says:

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me.”

I noticed in to being used as the phrase, rather than the word into. To refresh my English grammar, I quickly looked up the difference between in to and into.

I then wanted to see how this verse is worded in all of my English Bibles. There are several ways to accomplish this task in Logos, but I’ll show you what I did that evening in my personal study.

First, I created a collection of English Bibles, then I used Text Comparison to display Revelation 3:20 from that collection:

  • Choose Tools | Collections
  • Name the collection “English Bibles” (A)
  • Type this text in the Rule box: type:bible AND lang:english, which encompasses resources categorized in the library as Bibles published in the English language (B)
  • Close the Collections panel (C)

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  • Choose the Tools menu
  • Right click Text Comparison (D)
  • Select Open in a floating window (E)

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  • Type Revelation 3:20 in the Reference box (F)
  • Select English Bibles from the Resources drop-down list (G)

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  • Choose the Text Comparison panel menu (H)
  • Select Vertical layout (I)

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Notice that Logos displays a list of that one verse from all the English Bibles you own!

If you’d like to continue this study, use the Search tool to locate all the occurrences of both the phrase in to and the word into in your Bible.

If you enjoy these weekly tips, please check out the two-volume Logos 5 Training Manual Set, which teaches you how to get the most out of your software.

Logos 5: Record Your Answers in Logos Resources

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Have you noticed that much of our learning takes places through a question and answer model? When I became a Christian disciple in college, my pastor began mentoring me with the Design for Discipleship series from The Navigators. Using study guides filled with questions, I would read the Scripture and then record my answers in the space provided in the guides.

Logos tries to replicate this question and answer experience with text entry boxes scattered throughout numerous Logos resources.

Allow me to give you a specific example:

  • Click the title of the book in the list underneath the Command box to open it (B)

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  • Type 150 in the resource’s reference box (C)

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  • Press the Enter key to jump to page 150 (D)
  • Scroll until you see the section called Questions for Reflection (E)
  • Notice the text entry boxes underneath the questions (F)

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  • Type your desired text in the boxes just like you would record answers on lines in study guides (G)

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Currently this text is not searchable, but it does synchronize between your devices.

Be on the lookout for these text entry boxes all throughout your Logos resources, especially the ones containing questions!

If you enjoy these weekly tips, check out the Logos Bible Software Training Manual Bundle (print edition), which contains hundreds of pages on getting the most out of your software.

Logos 5: See Synonyms in Bible Word Study

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently presented me with this scenario:

As I was reading Luke 4:5 where Satan showed Jesus the kingdoms of the world, I was a little surprised to notice the Greek word for “world” was not “kosmos”, the word normally used for “world” in the New Testament. Is there a quick way to see all of the Greek words translated with the same English word?

This is an excellent question, and the answer is a resounding yes!

Using the above example, I’ll show you how to access a quick list of synonyms for world:

  • Open an English Bible with the reverse-interlinear option, such as the ESV (A)
  • Navigate to Luke 4:5 (B)
  • Right click the word world (C)
  • Select Selection world | Bible Word Study (D)

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  • Scroll in the newly generated report to the section called Greek Words (E)
  • Notice the English word world in the center of the translation ring (F) and the Greek words around the ring, which are the words translated world in the ESV New Testament (G)
  • Click a Greek word to see a list of verses in which that specific Greek word is translated world (H)

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  • Click the Greek lemma right above the list of verses (I) to generate a separate Bible Word Study report for that word (J)

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In essence, the Hebrew Words and Greek Words sections are displaying synonyms in the Old and New Testaments respectively for the word world. By studying all of these original words, you’ll gain a thorough understanding of the concept of world in the Bible.

If you enjoyed this tip, check out the Camp Logos 1 and 2 training videos for more original-language tips for English students.