Logos Pro Training: Mastering the Factbook

Logos 6’s Factbook gives you instant information on biblical topics. This tool functions like an encyclopedia, pulling together all the datasets and resources from your library, then presenting powerful overviews of each topic. For example, search “Tabernacle” in the Factbook and get a list of media, key verses, lemmas, senses, dictionary links, and topic suggestions for deeper study.

I break it all down for you in the video below.

Power the Factbook with these resources

As you can see, the Factbook is pretty awesome, but to get the most out of it, you need some resources that capitalize on its functionality. That’s why we put together the Factbook Collection—22 volumes that will transform your Factbook into a biblical and theological powerhouse. To get the best possible value, pick up the entire Factbook collection. It includes:

Start using the Factbook today

The Factbook is included in Logos 6 Starter and above, but to get the most out of this robust tool, I recommend Logos 6 Bronze or higher. Get started with Logos 6 and the Factbook now.

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Logos 6: Copy Highlighted Text to a Word Document

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A very common question I get is exemplified in this recent email inquiry from a Logos user:

Is there a way to copy and paste the biblical text into a Word document and maintain the highlights I’ve added?

The short answer is this: some highlights easily copy and paste, while others do not.

For example:

  • Open any Bible to any location
  • Choose Tools | Highlighting
  • Select some text in the Bible (A)
  • Expand the Solid Colors palette (B)
  • Select the Green Foreground style (C)

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  • Notice the selected text in the Bible turns green (D)

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  • Copy and paste the green highlighted text into a Word document
  • Notice the green highlighted text is maintained in the Word document (E)

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  • Select some additional text in the Bible (F)
  • Expand the Highlighter Pens palette (G)
  • Select the Green Highlighter style (H)

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  • Notice the selected text in the Bible is highlighted in green (I)

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  • Copy and paste the green highlighted text into a Word document
  • Notice the green highlighted text is NOT maintained in the Word document (J)

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What’s the difference in the above two scenarios?

Simply put, in the first example, we changed the character formatting on the text itself (turned it green). In the second, we basically added an image (green natural highlighter) to the text. Character formatting carries over in the copy–paste process; images do not.

So if you need Logos highlights in a Word document, use the Logos-provided styles that emphasize character formatting.

When you create your own styles, focus on the Font Styling (K) and Insert Text (L) sections that emphasize character formatting, including:

  • Font
  • Font size
  • Text color
  • Bold
  • Italics
  • Small caps
  • Large caps
  • Superscript
  • Subscript
  • Inserted text before or after the resource text

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All of the above characteristics are maintained as you copy and paste highlighted resource text from Logos to a Word document.

For more detailed instructions on creating your own highlighting styles, check out the Logos 6 Training Manual: Volume 2, which is part of the Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2 bundle.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Free Training Webinar: Basic Logos Navigation

Webinar_FB_AD_1200x628Every couple weeks, we host a free training webinar to help you harness the full potential and draw the greatest value out of your investment in Logos Bible Software.

So far, we’ve plumbed the depths of Logos search, explored how Logos can aid you in counseling prep, and pulled back the curtain on the High Definition Commentary series.

Most recently, we went back to the basics—reviewing the fundamentals of Logos navigation. Along the way, we also offered a great deal: 30% off the products we used in the demonstrations.

Want in on those deals? Watch the recording to get the coupon code:

We’re planning the next round of training webinars to help you master the world’s most powerful Bible study software. Be the first to about them: sign up for email updates below!





 
In the meantime, you can watch all of our previous training events: head to Logos.com/Webinar-Archive for the full lineup.

Logos 6: See All the Places an Event Is Mentioned in Scripture

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Oftentimes a biblical event is not only mentioned in its original context, but also elsewhere in Scripture. For example, the Israelites being fed with manna is recorded in Exodus 16, but John 6:31 also alludes to it. The fall of Jericho occurs in Joshua 6, but it’s also referenced in Hebrews 11:30.

To thoroughly study an event, we can investigate every reference to it in the Bible. Logos makes that investigation easier with a Factbook report.

Try this as an example:

  • Choose Tools | Factbook
  • Type red sea in the reference box (A)
  • Select The Israelites cross the Red Sea from the drop-down list (B)

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  • Notice a Factbook report is generated for that event (C)
  • Navigate to the Passages section in the report (D)
  • Observe the Key Verses subsection, which displays Exodus 14:15–31 in which the event originally took place (E)
  • Notice the See Also subsection which lists other verses in which the event is referenced (F)

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  • Click Open 20 passages in preferred Bible to display only the above verses in your preferred Bible (G)

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With the above steps, you can easily see and study all passages related to a biblical event in one location!

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Camp Logos 1.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Free Desktop Training: Learn from the Logos Pros!

LogosPro_blogI’m Todd, one of the Logos Pros at Faithlife. I’m part of a team of expert Logos trainers whose goal it is to educate and empower you with Logos Bible Software so that you can do better Bible study.

I’m excited to announce that Logos is offering free training for the desktop app. Each week, we’ll walk you through a new video tutorial from one of the Logos Pros teaching you how to master Logos’ tools and resources. You’ll learn to navigate lexicons in Logos, use the Passage Guide for in-depth research, consult cross-references in ancient literature, and much more.

Check back here every week for a new video! Or, get these videos delivered straight to your inbox—sign up for weekly email updates with free training:





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We want to learn from you, too! Share your favorite Logos tips or any questions you might have by shooting us an email at logospro@faithlife.com or leaving them in the comments below.

Logos 6: Quickly Mark Up Similar Words in a Passage

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A good friend recently emailed me explaining that while studying Philippians in the ESV, he noticed the words persecutor in Philippians 3:6 and press in Philippians 3:12 and Philippians 3:14 were all the same Greek lemma. He then asked if there was an easy way to automatically obtain a lemma count as well as highlight the same lemmas in a passage.

The answer? Yes.

The word list document type provides a lemma count, while a visual filter automatically highlights the text. In this post, however, I want to show you how to utilize a search to quickly highlight the same or similar lemmas in a passage.

  • Open the ESV to Philippians 3:1, where Paul cautions against legalism (A)
  • Right click on the word persecutor in Philippians 3:6 (B)
  • Select the lemma dioko from the context menu (C)
  • Select Search this resource (D)

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  • Make sure the verse range is set to an option, such as the New Testament, which includes Philippians (E)

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  • Notice that Logos highlights the active search results in a peachy color, which shows (as my friend pointed out) that persecutor in Philippian 3:6 and press in Philippians 3:12 and Philippians 3:14 are all highlighted because they’re all the same Greek lemma (F)

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You can, of course, execute additional right-click searches for other lemmas.

As you generate new searches, Logos opens new search panels and highlights those active results in the same peachy color. The result is that you may end up with 10 search panels open (G) and a lot of peachy words in the biblical text (H).

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To prevent new search panels from opening:

  • Choose the panel menu on the original search panel (I)
  • Select Send searches here (J)
  • Notice that Logos places a target on the search-panel menu (K)—now when you execute new right-click searches, the new results replace the existing results in the same search panel

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The lemma or dictionary form of a word is the same Hebrew or Greek word, regardless of its specific construction. In other words, the lemma may be a verb and searching for that lemma finds all occurrences of the verb whether its tense is present, aorist, subjunctive, etc.

Let’s say, however, that a word has both a noun and verb form. Searching for the lemma will not locate both. A lemma search is restricted to one part of speech.

To locate lemmas that are similar, but not the same, search for the root:

  • Right click the word perfect in Philippians 3:12 (L)
  • Select the root telos from the context menu (M)
  • Select Search this resource (N)

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  • Notice that the words perfect (verb in Philippians 3:12), mature (adjective in Philippians 3:15), and end (noun in Philippians 3:19) are all highlighted because they are similar lemmas sharing the same root (O)

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Try this root search with joy in Philippians 1:4, and notice how many peachy words appear!

This quick way of searching and temporarily highlighting words in a passage can be very useful in the observation phase of Bible study. Sometimes it reveals themes or repeated subjects such as joygospel, and service in Philippians.

However, please note a couple observations:

  • The same lemma in different contexts may have different meanings.
  • Just because lemmas may share the same root does not automatically imply those lemmas share similar meanings.

Use this post to help with observation, but always move into the interpretation phase of Bible study to answer the questions raised during observation.

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Camp Logos 1.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Louisville, Kentucky and Dallas, Texas.

Logos 6: Attach the Same Note to Different Places

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

As you well know, the same biblical events are often mentioned in multiple places in the Bible. For example, Jesus’ prayer in Gethsemane is recorded in Matthew, Mark, and Luke.

Let’s imagine we’re working our way through Mark when we come to the phrase “this cup” in Mark 14:36. We want to record our insights, so we create a note for Mark 14:36. During our research, however, we discover this same phrase also appears in Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42. Rather than creating two more separate notes, we can actually attach the same original note to the other two verses with a feature known as an attachment point.

Here’s how to get started with this power-user trick:

First, create the original note:

  • Choose Documents | Notes
  • Name the file something like “Notes on the Gospels” (A)
  • Make sure the view is set to Full (B)

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  • Open a Bible to Mark 14:36
  • Right click any word in Mark 14:36 (C)
  • Select Mark 14:36 from the context menu (D)
  • Select Add a note to “Notes on the Gospels” (E)

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  • Notice Logos creates, in the file, an individual note named “Mark 14:36” (F) with a Content box underneath it (G)

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  • Type your research in the Content box—for example, The demonstrative pronoun “this” implies nearness or being close at hand. (H)

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  • Notice Logos places a note indicator in the Bible next to Mark 14:36 (I)

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  • Rest the cursor on the indicator to see a pop-up preview of the note content (J)

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Next, add the attachment points:

  • Rest the cursor on the name of the note, “Mark 14:36” (K)

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  • Click the arrow link that appears to the far right of the note (L)
  • Select Edit attachment points (M)

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  • Type Matthew 26:39 in the reference box (N)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (O)

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  • Type Luke 22:42 in the reference box (P)
  • Select the biblical reference from the drop-down list (Q)

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  • Click Done to close the attachment-points box (R)

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  • Navigate to Matthew 26:39 and Luke 22:42 in the Bible and notice a note indicator next to each verse (S)

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Now regardless of which account of Jesus’ prayer you’re reading, you’ll have your insights about “this cup” right there with you!

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.

Logos 6: Find Verses in Which a Biblical Person Spoke

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Recently, I’ve been studying the life of Hagar in Genesis 16. In verses 7–8, the angel of the Lord found her and asked her two questions:

  • Where have you come from?
  • Where are you going?

These are two very profound questions regarding our direction in life, but we’ll save that discussion for another day. In this post, I simply want to focus on the fact that Logos identifies the angel of the Lord as the speaker of the questions by showing a megaphone icon. I was curious as to where else in Scripture the angel of the Lord spoke, so here’s what I did:

  • Open a Bible, like the ESV or NKJV, to Genesis 16:7 (A)
  • Find the megaphone icon in verse 8 identifying the angel of the Lord as the speaker (B)

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  • If the icons are not present:
    • Click the visual filters icon on the Bible’s toolbar (C)
    • Select Speaker labels (D)

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  • Right click any word in the questions from the angel of the Lord (E)
  • Select Angel of the Lord SPEAKER (F)
  • Select Search this resource (G)

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  • Notice that the search results display all the verses in which the angel of the Lord is identified as the speaker (H)

morris-proctor-find-verses-in-which-a-biblical-person-spoke-4 This simple search makes for rewarding research. Try it with:

  • Isaiah in Matthew 1:23
  • Sadducees in Matthew 22:24
  • Gabriel in Luke 1:28

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.

Bible Study with Logos 6

BSM_Blog_MarAprEach issue of Bible Study Magazine features a “Bible Study with Logos 6″ section, which shows you how Logos 6 can help you gain insight and understanding by tackling a complex Bible passage.

Here’s an example from the current issue of Bible Study Magazine—see the power of Logos 6 in action:

Let Your Yes Be Yes

By Elliot Ritzema

I remember reading a description of a political meeting from the 18th century. In it, one speech was described as “pathetic.” That was jarring to me, since calling something or someone “pathetic” is an insult today. But back then, it merely meant that the speech was intended to move the listeners to compassion.

If word meanings change over time, even in the same language, imagine translating an ancient concept from one language to another! We often have to do this when we study the Bible, so it is always worthwhile to research the words’ ancient meanings. One example is the concept of oaths in James 5:12:

But above all, my brothers, do not swear, either by heaven or by earth or by any other oath, but let your ‘yes’ be yes and your ‘no’ be no, so that you may not fall under condemnation.

Step 1: The Passage Guide

I often begin a study using the Passage Guide in Logos, which points me to commentaries, journals, cross-references, and ancient literature. Here I notice that Jesus’ statement about oaths in Matthew 5:33–37 is listed prominently among the cross-references. But for now, I want to use a feature that is new in Logos 6: the Cultural Concepts tool. I’m interested in how the concept of oaths was understood in the New Testament world.

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Step 2: Survey Oaths in the Bible

Clicking on “Oath” tab opens a Factbook entry on the concept of oaths: passages throughout the Bible, key verses, dictionary entries, different senses, and a list of ancient works all related to the concept of oaths.

The Bible list under the Cultural Concepts tab gives me 128 passages, only some of which specifically use the word “oath.” This is one benefit of exploring a topic with the Cultural Concepts tool rather than doing a word study. Here I find that oaths were used frequently by people including Abraham, Jacob, David, and God himself. How then did James get the idea that it was bad to swear an oath?

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Step 3: The New Testament Background of Swearing Oaths

To find an answer, it may be helpful to explore the concept in a dictionary or two. The Lexham Theological Wordbook says that “the perspectives on oaths and vows shift in the NT period. Jesus cuts through the cluttered and misguided practices of the religious leaders of his day in their swearing (ὀμνύω, omnyō) of oaths (ὅρκος, horkos) while at the same time pointing his followers to a higher standard than that of ot law (especially Matt 5:33–37).”1 This shift makes sense, especially since this passage from Matthew is from the Sermon on the Mount, in which Jesus explains how he fulfills the Law and the Prophets in unexpected ways.

Our exploration reveals that, although swearing oaths was a common occurrence in the Old Testament and in the cultural milieu of the New Testament, Jesus changed the attitude toward the practice. James continues that teaching, exhorting Christians to be honest at all times—not only when they have sworn an oath to do so.

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To get more articles about using Logos for Bible study, subscribe to Bible Study Magazine today! Plus, subscribers get special discounts inside each issue.

  1. Daniel DeWitt Lowery, “Oaths and Vows,” ed. Douglas Mangum et al., Lexham Theological Wordbook, Lexham Bible Reference Series (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2014). []

Logos 6: Opening Multiple Bibles on a Second Monitor

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I was recently emailed this question:

I study with a secondary monitor. I’d like to open on that screen a window containing several Bibles all linked together. How do I accomplish that?

This is an excellent question, with the answer utilizing several helpful Logos features. If you use multiple monitors with Logos, give the following steps a try.

First, open multiple Bibles in the same tile in the main Logos window:

  • Type ESV in the command box (A)

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  • Press the Enter key, which opens that Bible
  • Type NASB in the command box (B)

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  • Press the Enter key
  • Notice that the Bibles are probably in two separate tiles (C)

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  • Drag one Bible’s tab next to the other so they are both in the same tile (D)

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  • Open any additional Bibles you’d like
  • Makes sure all of your Bibles are in the same tile by dragging their tabs and placing them next to other Bible tabs (E)

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Next, place all Bibles in a floating window on the second monitor:

  • Right click any Bible tab (F)
  • Select Open all in a floating window (G)

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  • Notice all of the Bibles are now in a window separate from the main Logos window (H)

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  • Drag the floating window onto the second monitor

Now, place the Bibles in separate tiles in the floating window:

  • Click and hold a Bible tab in the floating window
  • Drag in and around the window noticing a blue highlighted area (I)

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  • Let go of the mouse, and the Bible will be placed in a tile where the blue highlight appeared (J)

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  • Repeat the above steps for the remaining Bible tabs so that all the Bibles are in separate tiles (K)

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Finally, link the Bible panels:

  • Chose the panel menu on a Bible (L)
  • Select Link set: A (M)

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  • Repeat the above steps for the other Bibles so they are all linked to set A (N)

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  • Type a reference like Matthew 6:33 in one of the reference boxes (O)

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  • Press the Enter key and notice that all of the Bibles move to that verse (P)

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As you can probably tell, using a second monitor enlarges your desktop for Bible study. Having your Bibles on another monitor allows you to use the main Logos window for guides, tools, searches, and other resources. You can also link the Bibles to a guide in the main window and the Bibles will follow that guide (or vice versa).

For added power, make sure to save this arrangement as a layout so you don’t have to recreate it in the future.

For more Logos training, be sure to check out the new Logos 6 Training Manual: Volumes 1 and 2.

And for live, hands-on training, be sure to register for an upcoming Camp Logos live training seminar, including events in Columbus, Georgia and Louisville, Kentucky.