A Simple Tip for Keeping Your Greek & Hebrew Skills Sharp

Even professors who teach biblical languages typically teach just one of those languages. They must put forth some effort to maintain their skills in the language they don’t teach. Pastors, too, must take practical steps to retain their knowledge of and facility with Greek and Hebrew. One practical thing I have done for 15 years now is to keep my Greek and Hebrew Bibles (including the LXX) open every time I look at the Scripture text. Doing so has helped me keep my Greek and Hebrew from growing rusty.

There’s a simple way to make sure the original languages are always visible to you in your Bible study: creating a virtual Greek/Hebrew Bible in Logos. Let me show you how and why you should do it.

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How to Use the Concordance to Discover Themes in a Biblical Book

The subject of today’s blog I owe to a pastor-teacher, seasoned Logos user, Camp Logos alumnus, and especially my friend, Dr. Robert Dean. Allow me to set it up for you.

Before doing detailed exegesis of passages in a biblical book, it’s a good idea to get a bird’s-eye view of the book. We should read the book numerous times looking for possible subjects, themes, or important topics covered in the book.

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Why We Need a New Kind of Hebrew Lexicon

Most of the time you look up a Hebrew word you probably don’t want the extreme depth and complication afforded by the top lexicons. Neither do you want to wade through a tight paragraph of tiny print full of abbreviations you don’t use often enough to remember. Paper lexicons were not designed for easy reading but for saving ink and paper.

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A Simple New Way to Search Your Bible Inside Logos

Good Bible readers have lots of questions. I wonder what other OT verses the author of Hebrews cites? Where was that other question Peter asked Jesus, the one I just read the other day? I wonder how often the NT authors refer to the fall of Adam?

And these questions lead to insights. In fact, you can’t usually get to insights unless you ask questions.

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Why Pastors Should Use a Different Greek Text

It’s the question that can derail the Sunday School class, make the pastor look poorly educated (i.e., “dumb”), and possibly even damage someone’s faith: Pastor, how come this footnote says that some manuscripts do not include the story of the woman caught in adultery?

Pastors need to know something about textual criticism.

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When Two Bible Translations Disagree, Which One Is Right?

Have you ever been listening to a preacher who is using a Bible translation different from the one in your lap? Generally, the wording is similar enough to avoid confusion; in fact those differences often provide little insights. But occasionally the differences are so striking that you get distracted.

When Bible translations differ greatly, what’s going on?

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Learn How to Pronounce Difficult Biblical Words with Logos

A short while ago I blogged about a couple of ways to hear Bible names pronounced. Then recently while working with the leadership at Fellowship Bible Church in Brentwood, TN, my good friend Dr. Michael Easley reminded me of the resource That’s Easy for You to Say which also helps with pronunciation.

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3 Tips for Discovering Biblical Connections in Logos

Your brain has already learned one of the most basic Bible study skills: finding connections. When you’re reading an ending to one of Paul’ letters, maybe you hear a faint echo. You think, “Didn’t Paul say something like this at the end of Colossians?” So you check, and lo and behold, he did. And it is frequently in drawing a connection between two such passages that you find insight in Bible study. Paul’s statements shed light on each other.

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How What You Love Shapes How You Interpret the Bible

Love of God and neighbor are the two great commandments upon which everything else in the Bible hangs—and, interestingly, the Bible happens to be the only book in the world written by both God and neighbor. So, for Christians, love drives hermeneutics.

Just like love drives all interpretation and discussion of online articles and social media in the United States.

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How to Compare the Septuagint to the Original Hebrew in Logos

This week’s post is centered on the following question I received from a Logos user:

I’m hoping you can help me with a frequent task: finding which Greek words (LXX) are used to translate a particular word in the Hebrew text. I’d like to know, for example, what Greek words the scholars chose to use in the LXX for “hesed,” which is so rich in meaning.

Even though not every Logos user will need this tip, the feature in the answer is a good trick to know if you venture into the original languages.

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