Theologically Sound

Summer is quickly approaching and I couldn’t be more excited. I’m looking forward to the warm weather, the blooming flowers, and most of all, the summer concerts. Listening to live music is an energizing experience: As the music begins, you’re  immersed in sound and find yourself reflecting on the lyrics that accompany it. I often find myself trying to relate to the melody and words that accompany it.

Music has always been a powerful form of communication. Musician and theologian Jeremy Begbie examines the connection between theological reflection and musical expression in Resounding Truth: Christian Wisdom in the World of Music .

In this study, Begbie looks at Scripture, musical history, and contemporary culture to show how the reader—and listener—can discover God’s truth in the music all around them.

Here’s what others are saying about Resounding Truth:

Jeremy Begbie is a musician/theologian par excellence. Whatever music you enjoy and wherever you are on the journey of faith and understanding, he will delight, surprise, challenge, and inspire you. A wonderful book by a wonderful writer, thinker, and musician.
N. T. Wright, Bishop of Durham

Jeremy Begbie’s thinking emerges out of a fusion of the best musical thinking about theology and the best theological thinking about music. The resulting text is charged with energy and insight—and not just for musicians and theologians. This vital work is poised to energize and strengthen the entire Christian community.
—John D. Witvliet, Calvin Institute of Christian Worship

This book resounds with the thoughtful, dynamic, and always engaging voice of Jeremy Begbie. Marked by a breathtaking range, driven by a creative vision, and packed with judicious insights, it will no doubt shape conversations about theology and the arts for year to come.
—Roger Lundin, Wheaton College

Make sure you order Resounding Truth while it’s still on Pre-Pub!

What’s your favorite thing about music? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 2

SproulThis is the second half to last week’s Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1 by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Using Lectionary Resources in Logos Bible Software

Lectionary resources in Logos Bible Software are designed to make it easy to find the text for the day and to read it in the Bible translation of your choice.

The readings are arranged by calendar date and the book automatically opens at the next set of readings. For each Sunday or feast, the title, the season and the liturgical color is given. The text of the readings for the day is displayed in the translation you specify at the top of the panel, and links are provided that you can use to open your Bible or right-click to quickly open up Logos guides, tools and searches for deeper study and sermon preparation. (Click the images to see them full size.)

Lectionary Readings for the Day

For more general study, you can also find a complete listing of readings organized by liturgical event (i.e. more like a print lectionary that you can re-use year to year) in the “Index of Readings” found at the end of the lectionary.

The home page ribbon also gives you quick access to your lectionary. It displays the title and readings for the next Sunday and opens up your lectionary when you click.

To get your preferred lectionary to show up, prioritize it from Library.

In addition, the “Lectionaries” section of the Passage Guide allows you to quickly see where the passage you’re studying appears in your lectionaries. How and where a passage is used in a lectionary reveals important ways that your passage has been used in worship in connection with other passages or important feasts.

Passage Guide

To get this section to show up in your Passage Guide, click “Add” on the Passage Guide title bar and select “Lectionaries”.

Helps & Commentaries Geared Toward the Lectionary

Besides the lectionary resources mentioned in Part I, Logos also has several commentaries and sermon preparation helps that are specifically geared toward use with a lectionary:

Do you use a lectionary? Leave us a comment and let us know which one.

Great Tools for Discipleship on Pre-Pub

When I am asked about my discipleship as a young Christian, I always end up talking about Jerry Bridges.

I was in my early twenties when I made my decision to follow Jesus. David—a man in my church who took discipleship seriously—quickly took me under his wing. He gave me a dog-eared copy of Bridges’ The Pursuit of Holiness and asked me to meet him on the following morning to go over the first chapter.

We met nearly every Monday morning for the next three years. After wrapping up The Pursuit of Holiness, we went on to read The Practice of Godliness. Jerry Bridges became such a big part of those early years that when I think back, it is almost as if Bridges was with us—counseling, instructing, and convicting.

I recently read through the notes I had scrawled in the margins of those books, and I was struck by their action-oriented nature, things like: “Make this my prayer,” “Memorize  this verse,” and “Resolve this!” These weren’t just theoretical meditations on theological principles (although it was that too), they were the nuts and bolts of applied discipleship.

Ten years later I was the one discipling college students, and I was leading them through Bridges’ books.  I can honestly say, I have read every book in the 15 volume Jerry Bridges Collection with a student at one time or another.

One of my favorites in this collection—and one I have used more than a couple times—is Respectable Sins: Confronting the Sins We Tolerate. In Respectable Sins, Bridges reminds us to be mindful of our internal posture and outlook. It may be the overt sins that will trip us up, but it’s the deep-seated conditions of the heart which can poison and blind us over time. In a real and vulnerable way, Bridges reveals how he has identified sins like envy, selfishness, and pride in his own heart, and offers practical solutions to combating those conditions we tend to ignore or explain away in ourselves. In this book full of conviction and encouragement, we are reminded that, although we all fall short, there is no excuse to grow complacent in our attitude towards sin.

The strength of these books lie in their ability to be simple without being simplistic. I have found them to be powerful tools for deep, reflective discussions more times than I can count. If you do your own discipleship, have a Bible study or home group, or even want to get back to the practical aspects of your own personal faith, this collection is a must.

Six of the fifteen volumes in the Jerry Bridges Collection are study/discussion guides. By reflecting on, discussing, and responding to these guides you can compound on Bridges’ already practical content and really delve into its personal application—whether you are using them alone or in a group.

Three of the study guides are for books which have been available from Logos for some time but are not in this collection. If you already have a copy of The Pursuit of Holiness (only $6.00 on Logos.com!), The Practice of Godliness, or Trusting God: Even When Life Hurts for Logos 4 then you’ll want to add the Jerry Bridges Collection (15 vols.) to your resources. Otherwise you can get the collection while it is at its discounted Pre-Pub price, and pick up the other books at your leisure.

Have you led any one through one of Jerry Bridges books, or used it in your own spiritual formation? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

 

The Feature-Filled Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament

The Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament (ACNT), on prepub now, is truly a resource for all. It offers something for everyone: Students can explore basic messages of the New Testament books and use the commentaries as a research tool for papers; Laypeople will find the commentaries helpful for personal or group Bible study; and pastors can use the commentaries for sermon and lesson preparation.

By explaining the text of the New Testament section by section, the fifteen volume Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament aims to bring the best of biblical scholarship on some of the most vital issues in the New Testament.

Each volume in the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament is loaded with these great features:

  • Introduction and topical overview of the New Testament book
  • Analysis of the book’s influence in church history
  • Discussion of textual issues
  • Review of historical topics like authorship and dating
  • Investigation of literary conventions and exegetical and interpretive challenges
  • List of other helpful resources like books, articles, and reference works for further study

Appealing to all, the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament is a great addition to your Bible study library. Not only will Scripture references in the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament be linked to the Greek New Testament or your English translation, you can also link the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament to other commentaries in your library. Be sure to grab the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament while it’s on Pre-Pub!

Have you used any of the Augsburg New Testament commentaries? Leave us a comment and tell us about it.

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1

Sproul

What is a Lectionary?

A lectionary is a book or list of selections from Scripture (sometimes called “pericopes,” “lections,” or “lessons”) chosen for reading in public worship. The Christian practice of Scripture reading in public worship likely derived from the synagogue, and over time, in both Jewish and Christian traditions, the pericopes associated with the different Sabbaths or Sundays and other celebrations of the year were fixed and compiled in books and lists. For the traditions that use them, these lectionary pericopes often form the basis for preaching and provide themes for worship.

Who Uses a Lectionary?

Use of a lectionary is usually associated with the more liturgical traditions within Christianity, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism and Lutheranism. Nonetheless, in recent decades, some non-liturgical churches have also adopted optional or occasional use of a lectionary as a way of broadening the texts used for preaching or relating Sunday worship to the church year.

What are the Most Common Lectionaries in Use?

Until the 20th century, most Western Christian liturgical traditions used some derivative of the lectionary of the Roman Rite that took shape in the Middle Ages. This lectionary consists of an annual cycle of readings assigning an epistle and a Gospel pericope to each mass.

Lutherans and Anglicans reformed this lectionary in accord with Reformation understandings of Scripture and worship, while the reforms of the Council of Trent adjusted and standardized this lectionary for use in Catholic liturgy. These lectionaries are still used by some Lutheran and Anglican/Episcopalian congregations and in Catholic communities that celebrate the traditional Roman Rite.

Logos Bible Software base packages include two Lutheran Lectionaries that follow the traditional, one year, format: the Christian Worship One Year Lectionary from the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary from the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

In the 1960s, the lectionary for the Roman Rite in the Catholic Church was revised in response to the Second Vatican Council’s call for more extensive use of Scripture in the liturgy. The traditional lectionary was replaced with a three year cycle of three readings for Sundays and major feasts days and a two year cycle of two readings for daily mass. For most of the year, the Sunday cycle consists of an Old Testament reading, a non-Gospel New Testament reading and a Gospel reading. The lectionary also supplies a Responsorial Psalm that follows the first reading.

This arrangement found favor not just in the Catholic Church but among Protestants as well, and many churches began adopting versions of it. The ecumenical collaboration of the Consultation on Common Texts eventually resulted in the Revised Common Lectionary in 1992, which today is the most commonly used lectionary among English-speaking Protestants. As a consequence of this development, the same texts are proclaimed, reflected and preached upon on any given Sunday in congregations around the world and across many Christian traditions.

Logos Bible Software base packages include six of these modern three-year lectionaries:

Are the use of lectionaries important to you in your private or public worship? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Next week we will look at using lectionary resources in Logos 4.

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Dig Deeper into the Word(s)

Today’s guest post is by Elise Bryant, from the Logos Bible Software Accounting department.

I feel like I’ve grown spiritually by listening to radio ministries. Three of my favorite teachers are Beth Moore, Kay Arthur and Nancy Leigh DeMoss. I’d hear them constantly refer to Greek and Hebrew—the languages that the Bible was first written in—to unlock the depth and beauty of Scripture. By doing word studies, they seemed to uncover the meaning of so many words that get lost in translation. Can I learn how to do the same thing in Logos? How can I follow along with them to know what they are saying is accurate?

What you just read came out of an email I sent out to my co-workers at Logos a while ago. My name is Elise Bryant and I work in the Accounting department at Logos. It’s funny, but even though I work here, I wasn’t familiar with our software. I just didn’t know how to use it to understand Scripture on a deeper level. So I asked my co-workers for some help.
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The Chesterton Birthday Sale!

Gilbert Keith ChestertonSunday, May 22, marks the birthday of British writer, G. K. Chesterton, and Logos is celebrating with a huge sale on the eleven-volume G. K. Chesterton Collection. Today through June 3, 2011, you can get the G. K. Chesterton Collection for over 60% off the retail price! For more information on how to take advantage of this deal, check out the end of this post.

Who is Chesterton?

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, writer of approximately 80 books, around 200 short stories, over 4000 essays, several plays, and hundreds of poems, is often considered one of the great minds of the early twentieth century.

Involving himself in many of the important discussions of his day, Chesterton showed great aptitude and intelligence across a wide spectrum of disciplines. He was well known as a Christian apologist, poet, playwright, journalist, lecturer, debater, literary critic, biographer, philosopher, novelist, and even as a contributor to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Contemporaries of Chesterton knew him to be both a deep and profound thinker as well as incredibly witty and jovial personality. George Bernard Shaw, who was both a friend of Chesterton’s and a frequent philosophical sparring partner, called Chesterton “a man of colossal genius.”
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Now on Pre-Pub: The Eerdmans Biblical Resources Series

“We should not limit ourselves to a certain field or type of book. There are good books in all the various phases of life and human experience. We should feed our minds with a variety of thoughts, as we do our stomachs with a variety of foods. . . . Great books are like mountain tops. They take us toward the skies, a new realm, and a new vision of the world and creation . . . . The greatest of all books are those that bring us near Divine truth, with a message of righteousness to all mankind.”
—William B. Eerdmans

Since 1911, the Eerdmans Publishing Company has made it a priority to publish only the finest in religious literature, featuring works from authors like C. S. Lewis, George MacDonald, Karl Barth, N. T. Wright, Philip Yancy, and John Calvin. Eerdmans is focused on publishing books across a variety of platforms to bring perspectives and ideas to new readers. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Logos is making another collection from this publishing company available to our users.

Comprised of works by biblical scholars, the Eerdmans Biblical Resources Series (14 vols.) brings you a powerful resources to aid in your biblical study. Whether you’re interested in discovering the deeper meaning behind poetry in Scripture or are grappling with the theology of manhood and womanhood, you will be amazed by the information available. These aren’t your everyday perspective-as-facts resources backed up with limited citations—these books are chock-full of information from ancient texts, historians, and other scholars.

Let’s be honest, we read the Bible for understanding—being aware of the historical and cultural context as you study is a key to grasping the significance of the text. Though we will never be able to fully apprehend the wisdom contained in the Bible, these volumes can bring more clarity to your personal study, and hopefully, “near Divine truth.”

Don’t miss your chance to get the Eerdmans Biblical Resources Series while it’s at its amazing Pre-Pub price.

Are there resources in this collection that are favorites of yours? Do you have some favorite Eerdmans titles? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Stanley Porter’s Idioms of the Greek New Testament

Idioms of the Greek New TestamentHave you had some instruction in Greek? A year in seminary or college awhile back, or you worked through a grammar on your own or in a group? Or you’ve just picked up stuff as you’ve studied?

Maybe you feel pretty good about what you’ve learned so far and can use lexicons like BDAG and TDNT, but reference grammars (like BDF and Wallace) are still unfamiliar territory.

Maybe you’re fine with “genitive” and “dative” and even “finite verb”, but when folks start talking about instrumental datives or transitive verbs, your eyes glaze over and your thoughts go elsewhere.

Good news: Stanley Porter’s Idioms of the Greek New Testament is geared toward you. It is an excellent and readable “intermediate handbook” that can help bridge the gap. Porter explains in his introduction:

My purpose for this book is modest. This book is designed for students who have completed approximately one year of Greek, and who would like an intermediate handbook to help them make a transition to using advanced grammars such as BDF, Robertson, Moulton and Turner.
Porter, S. E. (1999). Idioms of the Greek New Testament (14). Sheffield: JSOT.

The table of contents gives the range of items found in this 340 page book. It also includes a short glossary along with reference and subject index.
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Download a Free Czech Bible!

Do you read Czech? Or do you know someone who does?

We are excited to announce that Logos has recently released the Český Studijní Překlad (Czech Study Bible). The biblical text of the Czech Study Bible is easier to understand while maintaining the rich vocabulary and style of past translations. The translators of the Czech Study Bible have worked hard to translate the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts for increased accuracy. Filled with thousands of study notes and cross references, the Czech Study Bible will help increase the depth and breadth of passages you are studying. So pick up your free Czech Study Bible today!

Then consider adding another Czech resource to your library!

Logos also has the Czech Bible: 21st Century Edition available on Pre-Pub. This resource is translated into contemporary Czech, offering clarity and understanding as you read and study the Bible. This resource is currently the best modern Czech translation of the entire Bible. Order this new translation today on Pre-Pub and get it for only $19.95.
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