Important Patristic Documents Now Available on Community Pricing

The Patrologia Latina, GraecaSyriaca,and Orientalis represent some of the church’s most extensive, important primary-source documents. They contain the writings of the early and medieval Fathers and Doctors of the Church in Greek, Latin, Arabic, Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopic, Georgian, Slavonic, and Syriac. These texts are invaluable for anyone interested in patristics, church history, historical and systematic theology, textual criticism, or original-language study. In fact, the Patrologia Latina and Graeca served as the translation base for Philip Schaff’s Early Church Fathers and have been the bedrock for theological and historical studies of the Church Fathers.

PatrologiaThe Patrologiae Cursus Completus: Series Latina (Patrologia Latina for short), roughly translated “Complete Course on Patrology, Latin Series,” was published by Jacques Paul Migne between 1844 and 1864. The 221 volumes and approximately 150,000 pages that compose this important collection contain the writings of the Latin Fathers from Turtullian (in AD 200) to Pope Innocent III in (AD 1216). Each volume of the Patrologia Latina contains not only Latin editions, but also lengthy dissertations, introductions, critical apparatuses, and other supplementary material written in Latin. With the Patrologia Latina, you can research valuable but difficult-to-find works, like Radbertus’ and Ratramnus’ ninth-century writings on the Eucharist, which contain the earliest debate on transubstantiation and provide a window into the doctrine’s emergence and development.

The Patrologiae Cursus Completus: Series Graeca (Patrologia Graeca for short), roughly translated “Complete Course on Patrology, Greek Series,” was published by Jacques Paul Migne between 1857 and 1866. These 167 volumes and 110,000-plus pages contain the writings of the Greek Fathers from the late first or early second century to the fifteenth century. Many editions also contain notes on textual variants found among other manuscripts, along with explanatory material written in Latin. In addition to the 161 volumes of the PG (166 print volumes), the Logos edition also includes the later published index to the PG compiled by Ferdinandus Cavallera. With it, you can find entries by author, work, date, or subject. For those wanting to read important but obscure texts in their original languages, the Patrologia Graeca is a must. For example, you can read the Cappadocian Fathers, whose works were so important for formulating the doctrine of the Trinity against Sabellianism and tritheism.

These collections are not facsimile editions of page scans; they are full-blown, full-text Logos resources. Search, for example, for every occurrence of the word “filioque” to trace the important debate surrounding the procession of the Holy Spirit from the Son—a conflict that contributed to the Great Schism of 1054 between the Eastern and Western Churches. Search for “facienti quod en se est” to look for discussions on Franciscan pactum theology, which was so important for the controversies surrounding the Reformation era. Search for “θεοτοκος” or “ομοουσιος” to trace the important debates surrounding the deity of Christ.

Whether you’re Protestant, Orthodox, or Roman Catholic, if you want to delve into Christianity’s roots, these invaluable works will yield fruitful research not possible with print editions—and for a fraction of the price. Bid now to get an unbelievably low price with Community Pricing.

Save a Bundle on The Jewish Encyclopedia

It’s easy to forget that the Bible is a profoundly Jewish book. But a quick glance through the Old Testament reveals elements of Jewish history, poetry, and ancient narrative, all of which can seem incredibly foreign.

The Jewish Encyclopedia, published by Funk & Wagnalls around 1906, has been looked to for over a century as a guide through Jewish history, culture, rituals, and rabbinical teaching. Today it’s as much a research and study aid as it was in the early twentieth century. With this massive encyclopedia in Logos, it’s more accessible and useful than ever.

And now that it’s on Community Pricing, you can bid whatever you’d be willing to pay. With the current projected price, this is your chance to save 86%!

With thousands of articles, images, and illustrations, The Jewish Encyclopedia integrates beautifully into Logos, putting comprehensive accounts of Jewish history, literature, and intellectual life right at your fingertips. Don’t miss this opportunity to save 86% on The Jewish Encyclopediaplace your bid today.

Get a Free Copy of Abraham: Following God’s Promise!

Review Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum on your blog and get your copy free.

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We want you to see for yourself why this series is an incredible resource for anyone who wants to delve deeper into Bible study. The complete church curriculum version for pastors, small group leaders, and Bible teachers makes it’s easier than ever for communities to go deeper into the Word together.

The Studies in Faithful Living series explores the lives of biblical characters who responded in faith to God’s call. Each volume in the Patriarchs Collection, as well as Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan, examines key events in these characters’ lives and offers commentary, application, and teaching insights. Each eight-week study also includes questions for reflection and links to other resources for further study.

Israel Loken, the chair of Bible and theology departments at the College of Biblical Studies in Houston, Texas, recently remarked:

“Logos has taken group Bible study to the next level with their new Studies in Faithful Living series. Deeply engaging, biblically accurate, and filled with life-changing applications, this series is destined to be the go-to resource for lay leaders for years to come.”

Ready to write a review on your blog? Submit the form and we will unlock your free copy of Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum.

Already own Abraham: Following God’s Promise, but still want to participate? We will make you the same offer for Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan Complete Church Curriculum. To get this offer, please email

Plato and Aristotle Coming to Your Logos Library!

Two must-have philosophy collections are now on Community Pricing: The Dialogues of Plato (5 vols.) and The Works of Aristotle (12 vols.).

Plato and Aristotle are more than required reading—they sit at the foundation of Western thought. And even though they lived several centuries before Christ, their writings greatly influenced the development of Christian theology.

Take Plato and Augustine, for example. Plato distinguished between the physical and spiritual realms and recognized the existence of eternal, unchangeable forms. Augustine drew from Plato in coming to terms with Christianity, describing in his Confessions that the writings of the Platonists helped him recognize the truths of Scripture (Book VII).

Aristotle’s writings provided Thomas Aquinas with the framework for his magnum opus, the Summa Theologica. He adopted Aristotle’s account of the physical world, as well as his approach to moral philosophy and ethics. Aquinas held Aristotle in such high regard that he refers to him simply as “the Philosopher” throughout his work.

The Logos editions of Plato’s and Aristotle’s works allow you to discover connections between these philosophers and the theologians that drew from them. Search key terms in Plato and Augustine and compare their thoughts side by side. When Aquinas references Aristotle, jump to that location in his corpus with a click. Enhance your Logos library and your theological study with these core texts of the Western tradition. Bid on The Works of Aristotle (12 vols.) and The Dialogues of Plato (5 vols.) today!

But why stop at Aristotle and Plato? Sign up to receive news and updates about more classic works of history, philosophy, and literature!

Exclusive: 50% Off Fortress Press Products

Save 50% with nine exclusive offers from Fortress Press!

We’ll be rolling out these deals on Twitter—a new offer every Monday through April 8.

Here’s how to make sure you don’t miss out:

  1. Follow us on Twitter.
  2. Look for #DailyDeal. (The tweets go out in the early morning and afternoon.)
  3. Click the product link, and use the tweet’s coupon code at checkout.

Here’s today’s deal:

Today you can save on Don C. Benjamin’s The Old Testament Story, which explains what the OT meant then, and what it means now.

Regular price: $40
#DailyDeal price: $20

To save 50%, use coupon code: DD15733

Get it now!

Save 50% on Resources for Lent

Lent_blog_400x147In many Christian traditions (Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, Anglican and Presbyterian), this Wednesday marks the first day of Lent. For 40 days, observers everywhere will be forsaking things like meat, chocolate, or television—all in preparation for Easter. But why 40 days? What is Lent all about?

Origins of Lent’s 40 days

The tradition echoes Jesus’ fast during his 40 days and nights in the desert (Matt. 4:1-2), where he endured temptations offered by the devil himself. In that extreme climate, Jesus went without a bite to eat for more than a month. He must have been ravenous when the devil found him. And the theme of the first temptation? Bread (Matt. 4:3). After resisting the devil three times, Jesus banished him and went on to begin his public ministry, the culmination of which was his death on cross. Lent is a time of penance, prayer, and reflection as we contemplate Jesus’ ultimate gifts: his sinless life as a sacrifice for our sins, and his triumph over death.

The Hallmarks of Lent

Lent has many themes, but the three major motifs are denial, prayer, and reflection.

In honor of Christ, denial is exercised very intentionally during Lent. Jesus’ very life on earth was an example—he denied himself his incarnate form, humbling himself to walk among us, obedient to the point of death (Php. 2:5-8). And from the pages of the Bible he asks us to deny ourselves, take up the cross, and follow him (Matt 16:24). The self-denial associated with Lent helps focus our thoughts on him.

Focusing thoughts on God can easily give way to prayer and reflection. Jesus reveals the importance of prayer through example (Luke 6:12) and beseeches us to pray using parables (Luke 18:1). Through prayer and seeking God, Lent observers prepare for Easter by reflecting on why we celebrate it:

For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you should follow in his footsteps, who did not commit sin, nor was deceit found in his mouth, who when he was reviled, did not revile in return; when suffering, he did not threaten, but entrusted himself to the one who judges justly, who himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we may die to sins and live to righteousness, by whose wounds you were healed. (1 Peter 2:21–22)

This year, to help you reflect on Christ’s sacrifice during Lent, we’re offering several resources at 50% off:

Fifty Reasons Why Jesus Came to Die by John Piper

John Piper gathers 50 New Testament answers to the most important question faced by believers: What did God achieve for us in sending his Son to die? This book will help you reflect on the true meaning of Christ’s sacrifice. Get it now for only $4.98.

Jesus and the Victory of God by N. T. Wright

N. T. Wright pens a compelling account of how Jesus himself understood his mission as the divinely ordained fulfillment of Israel’s destiny. Get this resource for only $17.49.

The Murder of Jesus by John MacArthur

John MacArthur tells the story of Christ’s sacrifice, with special attention to Jesus’ words on the cross, the miracle that attended the Crucifixion, and the true meaning of Christ’s atoning work. Get this resource for only $7.50!

We’ve also discounted these powerful titles:

All Lent discounts extend through Feb. 13, so take advantage of these prices today!

Leave us a comment and tell us how you’ll be participating in Lent this year.

What’s Baptism, and What Does the Bible Say?

base packagesNo matter your denomination, you’ve probably asked (or have been asked) what baptism is. It’s been a point of controversy for centuries. Why do we baptize? When do we baptize? How should we baptize? What is baptism anyway?

One really awesome thing about Logos 5 is its ability to connect you to every Bible verse on baptism (and thousands of other things). This way, you can dig into the Word and see what it says about important issues.

What the Bible says about baptism

Let’s say you’re listening to (or crafting) a message on Ephesians 4 and you come to verse 5: “one Lord, one faith, one baptism.”

You might wonder, “What is baptism—really?” It’s easy to start exploring what the Bible says.

Start with a Bible Word Study

This is a smart way to get the definition of the word before diving into everything the Bible says about the practice. Just right-click “baptism” and run a Bible Word Study on the lemma. (What is a lemma? Find out here.)


This will bring you definitions from all your Greek dictionaries and show you every place where your Bible mentions this Greek word. You’ll see that the word literally means “to dip” or “immerse,” but obviously there’s more to baptism than being underwater.

Next step: the Topic Guide

Now it’s time to get a better feel for the subject. You can open the Topic Guide, enter “baptism,” and immediately see key passages on baptism and a host of related topics, verses, media, events, and more!

The Topic Guide is one of the big time-saving features of Logos 5. It connects you to plenty of information on a single topic in seconds! You could stop here, but some folks may want to do even more Bible study on baptism.

If that’s you, you’ll love running a Morph Search.

Now let’s get the big picture

You have an idea of what the word “baptism” means. Now we get at the real question: what is baptism? One way you can know is by using Scripture to interpret Scripture: find every time the Bible mentions the word “baptize,” “baptism,” “Baptist,” etc. Sound extensive and complicated? Good news: it’s really easy to do: just run a Morph Search for the root!

Baptism II

This brings you every single mention of the Greek root in your Bible! Plus you can grab its uses in multiple translations. If you prefer the ESV and you want to share what you find with a NASB fan, it’s really easy to do.

Baptism III

Just by using these simple Logos 5 tools, you’ve found every time the Bible uses this word for baptism. You’re ready to study what baptism means for yourself!

Get established in the Word with Logos 5

Baptism is just one topic you can study for yourself with Logos. If you don’t already have Logos 5, get it now.

If you want to learn more about how to get established in the Word using Logos, sign up to hear about our educational resources!

Wish You Knew Paul Better? Now You Can!

Arguably, with the exceptions of Jesus and David, we have an opportunity to know Paul through the biblical text better than any other biblical character. Yet, he remains a mystery—distorted by the breadth and depth of his writings, the often confusing nature of the Acts account of Paul’s ministry, and the reams of literature written on Paul’s letters.

We need a guide through Paul’s letters.

We want to be grounded in the historicity and culture of his world, and the connection points to Acts, while being guided through the various views on his writing—the details are many. But until recently, no such guide has existed. That’s why Logos created Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection.

Lexham Bible Guides enhance your investment in Logos Bible Software, bring clarity to the vastness of literature regarding a passage, and connect you linguistically, culturally, and historically to the context of biblical books.

Derek R. Brown, PhD, specializing in Paul, is bringing clarity and connection to the print equivalent of rows upon rows, shelves upon shelves—entire sections of libraries—of literature. He has done some of this work with the accompaniment of other researchers and under the editorship of Douglas Mangum, an Old Testament specialist—Paul draws upon the Old Testament often—and contributing editor to Faithlife Study Bible. This task is arduous, and that’s why we’ve done it for you.

For years, users (perhaps even yourself) have asked us to curate the vastness of their libraries—there’s just so much information. We have received requests to have a scholar filter through all of the content and provide a hand-edited framework for passages of the Bible; specific ideas have involved the recommendation of leveraging the content users already own and telling them about other content thus providing an even clearer way to approach the Bible. We know that time is short and we all need more of it. You want an expert to help you and want that expert on call 24-7. That’s what Lexham Bible Guides are for.

Lexham Bible Guides provide the research, the guide, and the media for sharing much of the material—this leaves the part you’re best at up to you. It’s like having a professional researcher alongside you as you read the Bible. If you’re not convinced yet, you can literally email me—the publisher—and I’ll tell you more.

This is the last chance to order Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection, a 13-volume collection, while it’s on Pre-Pub for a 21% savings of $115. Tomorrow, February 8, we’ll process orders and ship you Galatians, Ephesians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, and Philemon. As Dr. Brown finishes the others, they will also be released and immediately download to your library. Pre-order Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection today.

Grow in Your Understanding of Genesis

Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 is the largest Lexham Bible Guide yet. From God’s call on Abraham to Joseph’s death in Egypt, the volume addresses more than 200 exegetical, theological, and historical issues and offers 55 word studies, giving you insight into the interpretation of these foundational chapters. For each issue, we examine the viewpoints of top scholars and biblical interpreters, allowing you to gain a quick understanding without having to read through several commentaries.

In Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50, we engage with more than 25 Genesis commentaries as well as relevant dictionaries and journal articles, providing you with a breadth of opinions on the more than 200 issues discussed in the volume. Our summaries of these commentaries’ positions save you countless hours of reading and research and give you short excerpts of the viewpoints articulated in biblical scholarship.

For example, after Joseph rose to power in Egypt, he had two sons with his Egyptian wife (see Gen 41:50–52). Scholars disagree on the relevance of Joseph’s names for his sons. Here is an excerpt from the volume:

Manasseh and Ephraim

During the seven years of plenty, Joseph has two sons (Gen 41:50). The giving of names in the Bible and in the ancient Near East carried great significance. Here, the names Joseph gives his sons speak directly to his past struggles.

Joseph names his first son Manasseh (menashsheh), which means something like “one who causes to forget.” Joseph explains this name by saying, “God has made me forget (nashshani) all my trouble and all my father’s house” (Gen 41:51). He names his second son Ephraim, explaining that “God has made me fruitful in the land of my affliction” (Gen 41:52). Ephraim (ephrayim) is derived from parah, meaning “to be fruitful.”

Both names highlight the hardship of Joseph’s life (“my trouble” and “my affliction”) and God’s role in the success he is now enjoying (“God has made me forget” and “God has made me fruitful”). However, scholars disagree on how to understand the additional note about forgetting “all my father’s house.” Some view it negatively and argue that Joseph should have been looking to reconcile with his father. Others view this as Joseph’s desire to forget his past sufferings

  • McKeown argues that Joseph’s statement about forgetting “all the house of my father” indicates that he does not plan to seek out his family. He asserts that Joseph has a new family in Egypt and does not show interest in either reconciliation or revenge.
  • Sarna believes the phrase “all my trouble and all my father’s house” should be translated as “my suffering in my parental home.” He argues that Joseph is not forgetting his father’s home but is merely not allowing the troubles of his youth to intrude on his future.
  • Waltke notes that Joseph is “strangely indifferent” toward his father. He points out, though, that the narrator does not condemn Joseph for this. Waltke also argues that Joseph’s giving his sons Hebrew names instead of Egyptian names indicates that he has not forgotten his father’s house.
  • Westermann understands the phrase “and all my father’s house” to mean “I am far from my father’s house.” He asserts that the names Joseph chooses reveal his understanding that God has been with him (Gen 39:2–6, 21–23).

Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 is available individually or as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection. The collection is on sale for a limited time—only until February 14, when Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 ships. Order now to get the lowest price on this collection, which will serve as your guide to Genesis for many years to come.

Free Book of the Month: Lewis Sperry Chafer’s Satan

“No subject was more dear to the heart of Dr. Lewis Sperry Chafer than the teaching of the Scriptures on the spiritual life.”—John F. Walvoord, president of Dallas Theological Seminary

Lewis Sperry Chafer’s Satan is February’s Free Book of the Month.

Drawing on Scripture, Chafer encourages believers to be aware of the enemy’s tactics and schemes. This volume is both a challenge and a comfort to those who are looking to better understand Satan’s history—and future!

Lewis Sperry Chafer was born in Rock Creek, Ohio, in 1871. A Presbyterian clergyman and educator, he founded the Evangelical Theological College, which we now know as Dallas Theological Seminary. He served the college as president and professor of systematic theology until his death in 1952.

You can get Chafer’s book free through the end of February, and when you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the nine-volume Lewis Sperry Chafer

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to get your free book and enter the giveaway.