Classical Spotlight: A Greek Lexicon, a Spanish Novelist, and a German Philosopher

noet-classical-foundations-bundleScholars have a name for the West’s interconnected canon of philosophy, history, and literature: the Great Conversation. It’s an enormous, fascinating body of work, and it’s reflected in an enormous, fascinating library: Noet’s 124-volume Classical Foundations Bundle.

That’s a lot of scholarship to take in, so let’s take a closer look at just three categories: ancient languages, literature, and philosophy.

1. Ancient languages: Liddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon

This famous lexicon covers Greek from the eleventh century BC to the fifth century AD. It’s extremely detailed: each entry gives not only a definition, but also examples of irregular inflections and, most importantly, numerous quotations from classical sources to demonstrate usage. Of course, the same level of detail that makes LSJ such a treasure makes the print edition cumbersome: to get the most out of it, you have to flip between the main entries and the supplement, and then between LSJ and the primary sources.

Not so with Logos:

You’ll want it if you’re studying Homer and Hesiod. You’ll want it if you’re studying Plato and Aristotle. You’ll want it if you’re studying Paul or Chrysostom or Origen. For serious scholars of ancient Greek, LSJ is simply the most useful dictionary in the world.

On its own, LSJ costs $135; considering how much it adds to every ancient-Greek resource in your library, that’s a smart investment. But the Classical Foundations Bundle gives you an even better deal: you’ll get 123 more volumes across philosophy, history, and the classics, including many more reference works for both Greek and Latin.

Pick up LSJ on its own, or get the best value: add it and many more language resources with the Classical Foundations Bundle.

2. Literature: Cervantes’ Don Quixote

You probably already know the plot of Don Quixote: the earnest Alonso Quijano, having read so many tales of knighthood and chivalry, imagines himself to be a knight named Don Quixote; the loyal Sancho Panza joins him on his adventures, stealing every scene with his unassuming wit. You know it’s a classic. What you may not know is how interesting it is.

For one thing, it was arguably the first novel: though several works compete for the title, the Quixote’s formal innovation is undeniable and tremendous. For another thing, it’s shot through with the most modern literary characteristic of them all: irony, the perceptible gap between what’s stated and what’s implied. (We all know Don Quixote isn’t the knight he thinks he is.) Quixote’s susceptibility to stories implicates all of us who find ourselves buying into shared narratives and allowing ourselves to be guided by them—in that sense, the story is subversive to the powers of epic and propaganda. It’s also just as meta as the twentieth century’s metafiction: in the sixth chapter of book 1, for example, a barber inspects Quixote’s library and comes across Cervantes’ own Galatea, which, he concludes, “has [only] some good invention in it” and “presents us with something but brings nothing to a conclusion.” In chapter 9, we learn (falsely) that the original Quixote itself was found in a heap of papers for sale, written entirely in Arabic. By the time we reach book 2 (not included in the Noet bundle), the protagonists have all read book 1.

It’s easy to read the great twentieth- and twenty-first-century novelists and conclude that only moderns could think this way. Don Quixote proves that assumption wrong, and it’s a sheer pleasure to read. Add it to your library, along with dozens of other literary monuments: pick up the Noet Classical Foundations Bundle today.

3. Philosophy: Immanuel Kant

Immanuel Kant is widely regarded as the greatest modern philosopher, so—whether or not you find merit in his conclusions—you’ll certainly want to be familiar with the broad strokes of his thought. Kant entered philosophy as a rationalist, in the mold of Descartes. Then Hume, the radical empiricist, “woke [him] from [his] dogmatic slumber,” leading him to start doubting the feasibility of working from subjective thought and perception to objective claims about the world. Truth, for Kant, conforms to the mind that thinks it: this makes him an important milestone in the postmodern turn toward the subjective.

It’s unsurprising, then, that Kant argues for God from intuition, not reason. “Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe,” he writes: “the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.” From that moral law follows the gap between how we are and how we know we should be; from reflection on that gap follows belief in God. But many of his theological conclusions are decidedly unorthodox—he’s widely thought of as advocating for self-salvation as opposed to atonement and divine grace; likewise, most Christians would object to his conclusion that truth is in the mind of the subject.

That’s one reason why he (like philosophy generally) is worth studying from a Christian perspective: if you’re going to make convincing arguments against these positions, you have to understand them. (Of course, there are lots of other good reasons to study philosophy.) The Classical Foundations Bundle gives you Kant’s most important works, along with the context within which he wrote—Descartes, Hume, and the other great works of the Western tradition.

Understand Kant’s philosophy and the larger context of Western thought: pick up Noet’s Classical Foundations Bundle.

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We’ve discussed the usefulness of LSJ, the inventiveness of Cervantes, and the influence of Kant. These attributes are important, but they’re not always obvious—sometimes we need context and commentary to see how everything fits together. What’s so great about the Classical Foundations Bundle is that it gives you the big picture: writers commenting on writers, philosophers refuting philosophers, trains of thought developing over the centuries. It gives you the context to not just read, but understand—the context to join the Great Conversation.

Know the West’s most important works of philosophy, history, and literature: start learning today with the Classical Foundations Bundle.

Get Introductory Savings on Baker’s D.A. Carson Collection!

d-a-carson-collectionLast month, the Logos community voted for D.A. Carson as the Logos March Madness champion, earning you 75% off a wide array of his works.

This year’s Logos March Madness deals have ended, but we have some exciting news. Because you’ve shown so much love for D.A. Carson, we’re working with Baker to offer all 15 of Carson’s works from Baker Academic at a discount! Just use coupon code BAKERCARSON to get your 10% discount.

But you can save even more!

If you took advantage of Logos March Madness (or any other sale, for that matter) and picked up any of Baker’s D.A. Carson books, you’ll get a Dynamic Pricing discount on this new collection—you won’t pay for the books you already own. That’s a huge opportunity to add Carson titles at a great price. For example, the collection features Carson’s Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament­ (which wasn’t part of the Logos March Madness sale); if you’ve been holding out to get it at a special price, now’s your chance!

Stack your 10% discount on top of your Dynamic Pricing discount and you’ll save even more. But hurry—the coupon is only good through Wednesday, April 30.

Use coupon code BAKERCARSON and take 10% off the Baker D.A. Carson Collection today.

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P.S. Interested in even more resources?

We recently consolidated both the Two Horizons Commentary and the Socio-Rhetorical Commentary series, allowing you to find all the volumes on each page! Just sign in and visit the product pages to see your Dynamic Pricing discount.

Why You Should Care What de Tocqueville Says about America

tocqueville-democracy-in-americaIn 1831, a French aristocrat named Alexis de Tocqueville came to America to understand its culture. The resulting portrait, Democracy in America, is one of the all-time great works of political philosophy—not to mention probably the most famous book about America ever written.

Democracy in America offers both glowing praise and withering criticism. It’s cited by both the right and the left. It’s been publicly quoted by every American president since Eisenhower.

Here are three reasons you should read de Tocqueville:

1. To get a new perspective on America

De Tocqueville was one of the greatest political philosophers ever, and his arguments about American culture are fascinating. A few tidbits:

  • He argues that the two greatest building blocks of American liberty are (unsurprisingly) a free press and (surprisingly) the absence of primogeniture—the aristocratic practice, widespread in de Tocqueville’s time, of leaving the entire family inheritance to the firstborn. “Grant me thirty years of equal division of inheritances and a free press,” he writes, “and I will provide you with a republic.”
  • Though John Adams introduced the phrase tyranny of the majority, it was de Tocqueville who popularized it. “In America,” he argues, “the majority raises formidable barriers around the liberty of opinion; within these barriers an author may write what he pleases, but woe to him if he goes beyond them.” (He elaborates, scathingly, that “the majority undertakes to supply a multitude of ready-made opinions for the use of individuals, who are thus relieved from the necessity of forming opinions of their own.”)
  • He identifies American liberty’s greatest asset as social mobility: though there exist vast class differences, those differences aren’t set in stone, as they are in an aristocracy. In de Tocqueville’s America, anyone can, through merit, ascend to any rank. (He goes on to link this social mobility with America’s reputation for materialism: because we—they, if you’re outside the US—are on a level playing field, we’re all competing; because we’re all competing, we assess things in terms of personal gain.)

Democracy in America is full of arguments like these, usually couched in memorable, highly quotable language. It’s not just a book about American history—it’s a book about how the world sees America, and how America sees itself.

2. To be an informed voice in the public discourse

When a work is cited by every American president since Eisenhower, you know it’s not only insightful, but also compelling. That’s because de Tocqueville is given to universal statements, delivered with aphoristic force. On their own, claims like these can imply all sorts of other ideological biases. But de Tocqueville, of course, was writing outside and before America’s current understanding of left and right—it’s a big mistake to interpret him as supporting the entirety of any one political platform. (The editors of the most recent translation, in 2001, almost omitted the subject index, given that “such an index may give a false sense of security” by encouraging quote-by-quote reading.) When you know Democracy in America, you’ll know the context next time you hear de Tocqueville quoted in a stump speech. You’ll be equipped to check the facts and make up your own mind.

3. To get a window into the Second Great Awakening

Many of de Tocqueville’s insights are timeless (his confident, meticulous style would have you believe that all of them are), but Democracy in America stands as a work of pure history, too. De Tocqueville, remember, was in America in the early 1800s: Andrew Jackson had recently been elected president; tensions were mounting over slavery; war with Mexico was just around the corner. Given the book’s status as a historical snapshot, one of the most interesting things about de Tocqueville’s America is how Christian it is: de Tocqueville writes that “There is no country in the world where the Christian religion retains a greater influence over the souls of men than in America, and there can be no greater proof of its utility and of its conformity to human nature than that its influence is powerfully felt over the most enlightened and free nation of the earth.” There are innumerable similar claims.

It’s no surprise, though. After all, the Second Great Awakening was in full force—Charles Finney, Lyman Beecher, and other preachers were drawing huge crowds across the country. Democracy in America isn’t just a study of America’s general identity; it’s a detailed look at American Christianity. Pair it with IVP’s Dictionary of Christianity in America and the Charles Finney Collection or Lyman Beecher Collection and you’ll be set up to understand this important chapter in American faith.

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Get the Logos edition for 68% off!

Right now, Democracy in America is on Community Pricing for just $12—that’s 68% off. You’ve seen how much context matters; Logos, with its encyclopedias and cross-references, is the best platform for contextualized reading there is.

If you’re interested in American (or American Christian) history, you’ll find Democracy in America fascinating. This is one of the world’s masterpieces of political philosophy, in the world’s leading format for serious study: at just $12, it’s a superb deal.

That means the price will be going up very soon—don’t let yourself miss this one.

Bid on Democracy in America for just $12, and then pick up more resources to study the Second Great Awakening: pair it with IVP’s Dictionary of Christianity in America, and add the Charles Finney Collection and the Lyman Beecher Collection for even more context.

Save Big during Our Canadian Spring Sale

Canadian Spring SaleRight now, you can save big on 30+ resources in our Canadian Spring Sale—individual commentaries, collections, and more! This sale only lasts through midnight on Monday—don’t miss out.

Here are some of the resources on sale:

A Handbook to Exegesis of the New Testament

Regularly $49.95—get it for $35.95

The Handbook to Exegesis of the New Testament starts off with an analysis of the various definitions of “exegesis,” a notoriously difficult term to pin down, as well as an essay covering the discipline’s basic tools. From there, it discusses the major exegetical models: textual criticism, linguistic analysis, genre criticism, source, form, and redaction criticism, discourse analysis, rhetorical and narratological criticism, literary criticism, and canonical criticism. You’ll come away with a solid understanding of what exegesis means and how to do it.

encountering-the-new-testament-a-historical-and-theological-survey-3rd-edEncountering the New Testament: A Historical and Theological Survey

Regularly $44.99—get it for $35.99

Studying the New Testament can be not only exciting, but also intimidating. This highly readable survey is designed to make the adventure less daunting and more rewarding. It includes sidebars that address ethical and theological concerns and provide primary sources, focus boxes isolating key issues, chapter outlines, learning objectives, summaries, and study questions. You’ll find this introductory text both informative and engaging.

letters-to-the-church-a-survey-of-hebrews-and-the-general-epistlesLetters to the Church: A Survey of Hebrews and the General Epistles

Regularly $40.95—get it for $32.95

In this rich commentary, respected New Testament scholar Karen Jobes explores the cultural and theological background of Hebrews and the general epistles (James through Jude). Jobes writes from an evangelical perspective, addressing not only issues of historical relevance but also how these ancient books connect with Christian faith and practice today. Pastors, professors, students, and laypeople interested in deeper biblical study will find this resource accessible and spiritually meaningful.

These aren’t all the products on sale—check out the complete list!

Save on These 3 Valuable Counseling Resources

dan-b-allender-counseling-collectionIt’s part of life: whether you’re a licensed counselor or a compassionate friend, people are going to come to you for advice. When they do, it’s important that you be ready with counseling that’s both helpful and biblical.

Why walk that road alone? Some of the world’s most respected, experienced counselors have put together resources to help you.

Right now, you can save on:

1. The Dan B. Allender Counseling Collection

In a society where masking one’s emotions is the norm, it’s difficult to come to grips with the reality of deep spiritual suffering. Here, author and psychologist Dan B. Allender gives his unique perspectives on emotions, love, and childhood sexual abuse, and presents biblical ways to address these topics.

Filled with practical helps and biblical encouragement, the three-volume Dan B. Allender Counseling Collection will equip you to grasp the hope and freedom found in Christ.

Get it today for 25% off!

bh-marriage-and-family-collection2. B&H Marriage and Family Collection

Today’s most pressing marriage and family issues require advice from Christian pastors and counselors. That’s why the 19-volume B&H Marriage and Family Collection is ideal for pastors, teachers, parents, and anyone else seeking advice for restoring and maintaining healthy relationships. It’ll help your marriage and family not merely survive, but flourish.

Get it today for 21% off!

3. Caring for People God’s Way

Caring for People God’s Way presents Christian counseling in a systematic, step-by-step manner, and then applies that process to the most common issues faced by Christian counselors. You’ll learn to address stress and anxiety, trauma, perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder, grief, loss, anger, suicide, personality disorders, gambling, sexual addictions, and more.

Get it today for 10% off!

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These aren’t all the products on sale this month—check out the rest of our April Sale resources.

Learn from the Experts with the Lexham Methods Series

lexham-methods-series (2)A few weeks ago, we dropped the price of the Lexham Methods Series to $60: that’s over 75% off, an incredible discount on such a valuable resource. Have you placed your Community Pricing bid? If not, you should bid right now—a price this low won’t last long!

Need a bit more convincing? Our team of scholars has put hours of research and writing into the resource, but to make it even better, we’ve also called on a number of expert contributors. Lexham Methods is a collaboration between professors, linguists, and our in-house research team.

Here’s what our partners have to say about their work on the Methods series:

What’s most rewarding about working on the Lexham Methods Series?

David B. Schreiner (PhD): My favorite part of working with the series is rising to the challenge. Writing on a particular interpretive method forces you to know all aspects of the method. Writing for an audience that’s not necessarily restricted to the academy forces you to be on top of your game. You have to communicate ideas in a way that ensures broad-scale understanding.

Amy Balogh (PhD candidate, Iliff School of Theology & University of Denver): The best part about working on the Lexham Methods Series is the opportunity to share my understanding of the biblical text as a skillfully crafted work of art. Knowing that all who read from this series will come away with fresh, new insights into the text makes the project one that’s worthy of the time, effort, and care going into it.

How can the Lexham Methods Series help our users make their Bible study better?

John DelHousaye (PhD, associate professor, Phoenix Seminary): The Lexham Methods Series takes many of the best insights of biblical scholarship in the last two centuries and presents them in an understandable, practical way for the serious student of God’s Word.

Douglas Estes (PhD, lead pastor, Trinity Church & adjunct professor, Phoenix Seminary): With the Logos platform, Bible students of all levels can use this series as an easy-to-understand reference running parallel to the text. As a result, it has great potential to eliminate the divide between the professional scholar and the everyday Bible student.

What sets the Lexham Methods Series apart from similar products?

Judith Odor (PhD candidate, Asbury Theological Seminary): The brevity of the chapters—of each treatment of each method—makes the LMS unique in its field. There may be other introductions to various methods that offer the same depth of material, but they’re much lengthier, they’re more involved, they’re less approachable, and they don’t offer such a wide range of methods for your perusal, refreshment, or education.

Jeffery Leonard (PhD, assistant professor, Samford University): One of the best things about the Lexham Methods Series is the way it walks the reader step by step through each individual method, giving examples and comparisons along the way. It does a great job of balancing theory on the one hand with practical examples on the other.

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Understand and interpret the Bible better than ever before. Bid now on the Lexham Methods Series!

Explore the Language of the Early Church

HarpersLatinDictionaryWe pay a lot of attention to the Bible’s original Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic, but many of the early church’s most important texts were written in another language: Latin. Luckily, Logos offers some outstanding Latin reference works and primary sources that can bring you closer to the ancient world.

Let’s start exploring:

Get the best Latin dictionary

Choosing scholarly resources can come down to preference—we all have our favorite authors, our favorite exegetical methods, our favorite reference works. But sometimes there’s no room for debate: sometimes one resource is clearly the standard in its field.

Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary is that resource. For those of us who’re fascinated by the ancient world, it’s simply the finest Latin dictionary available.

Scholars choose Lewis and Short because of its breadth. It gives you 2,019 pages’ worth of lexical data, spanning classical times through the early modern era; that makes it an important aid whether you’re working through Irenaeus or through Aquinas. If you’re studying Christian history, you’ll be working with Latin. If you’re working with Latin, you’ll want this dictionary.

Moreover, it’s in the Logos edition that Lewis and Short really shines. Those 2,019 pages can be hard to navigate in print, to say nothing of the legwork involved in cross-referencing them against the patristic hard copies (if you can even access any). With Logos,* everything is indexed for precise searches, and you can jump right from an entry to a primary source and vice versa. It’s that mixture of scholarly rigor and right-now usefulness that’s earned Lewis and Short such glowing reviews: other Logos users write that “[t]his is THE Latin dictionary,” that it’s “easily the best Latin dictionary ever made,” that it’s “stellar,” that “no hard copy can even begin to compete with what we can do with a Logos dictionary.”

Navigate the early church’s culture with the finest Latin dictionary available: pick up Lewis and Short right now.

* For now, Lewis and Short is only available for desktop, not mobile.

Then choose from these important primary sources:

early-church-fathers-protestant-edition1. Early Church Fathers

Augustine, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, Eusebius, Origen—this massive collection sets you up with English translations of the postapostolic era’s most important works. It’s a window into the origins of a great deal of Christian doctrine, which makes it a fascinating way to revisit the foundations of your faith. Pick up the Early Church Fathers collection and explore the early church’s world.

2. The Works of Prudentius

The poems of Prudentius, who was educated in religion, literature, and rhetoric, are shot through with biblical influence. His most important work is the Psychomachia, which is considered the first major Christian allegory; that means it paved the way for classics like the Divine Comedy and The Pilgrim’s Progress. You’re already studying the early church’s theologians. Now, while the four-volume Works of Prudentius is on Community Pricing, you can study its poetry for 73% off.

works-of-ovid-and-horace3. Works of Ovid and Horace

Latin literature’s three canonical poets are Virgil, Ovid, and Horace. Though they weren’t Christian writers, it’s important to know their work, which was hugely influential in the ancient world. You can get Virgil’s Aeneid in the famous Harvard Classics Collection; Ovid and Horace you can get in the incredibly rich Works of Ovid and Horace. (The standout volume is Ovid’s Metamorphoses, one of the most influential poems in literary history.) Get in on the best price—bid on Ovid’s and Horace’s collected works for 83% off!

4. Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things

In Acts 17:18, Paul addresses Epicurean and Stoic philosophers. If you’re curious about Paul’s context, you’ll want to look into Epicureanism, one of the most popular worldviews in early Christian times; the best way to do so is through the writings of Lucretius. (Epicurus’ magnum opus, On Nature, was destroyed, but Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things builds on Epicurus’ thought.) Right now, On the Nature of Things is 72% off on Community Pricing—place your bid before the price goes up.

Pick up Lewis and Short today, and then choose the primary sources that fit your study!

Torrey, UBS, and Biblical Apologetics—Newly Updated!

UBSHandbookSeries-OldTestament&Apocrypha-01We’re constantly improving to make it easier to find your favorite authors and series. We just expanded three important Logos collections—are your editions up to date? Find out: visit the product page, log in to your account, and check out your custom price!

1. UBS Handbook New and Old Testament Series (55 vols.)

The UBS Handbook Series is a highly respected scholarly series that gives pastors, students, and Bible-lovers of all kinds a valuable exegetical, historical, and cultural look at the Old and New Testaments and the OT Apocrypha. Now updated to include 1 & 2 Kings, Ezra, Nehemiah, and several deuterocanonical books, the UBS Handbook Series equips you for exegesis.

2. Works of R.A. Torrey Collection (26 vols.)

Explore more of R.A. Torrey than you ever knew. This expanded collection includes his sermons, his important four-volume Fundamentals, his works on the Christian life, the Holy Spirit, and prayer, and his highly recommended apologetic works. Already own some of these books? Visit the product page to see your personalized price—the volumes you own have already been accounted for.

Use coupon code TORREY15 to save 15% when you complete the set! Act soon—this coupon code expires next Friday!

the-journal-of-biblical-apologetics3. Journal of Biblical Apologetics (11 vols.)

The Journal of Biblical Apologetics series provides accessible approaches to apologetics from an evangelical perspective, tying theological ideas back to their biblical roots and weighing nonbiblical ideas against biblical truth. Explore Islam, natural theology, Catholicism, and more in this engaging and recently compiled collection.

If you’re on a budget, you don’t have to pay all at once—set up an interest-free payment plan and start enjoying these books today.

Update your collections right now!

Get a Better Understanding of the Ancient World for Just $7

Hediod CollectionWe tend to think of ancient Greece (and the ancient world generally) as belonging to a single period: antiquity. The closer we look, though, the less antiquity looks like one internally consistent era—in fact, ancient Greece had its own rupture between ancient and modern. Between the two are the fascinating works of Homer and Hesiod.

The Greeks’ own Greek classics

By the time Aristotle composed his first arguments against Plato, the works of Homer and Hesiod were already hundreds of years old and venerated as classics. Most modern historians place Homer between 800 and 700 BC; Hesiod was active between 750 and 650 BC. (For reference, that puts us squarely in OT times: around then, Isaiah would have been carrying out his ministry in Judah.) Homer you know from his epics the Iliad and the Odyssey; Hesiod you know from the story of Pandora’s Box, which was actually a jar. The Greeks thought of Homer and Hesiod as a pair: the former gave the culture its great shared narratives, and the latter filled in the details—Hesiod described Greek mythology, farming, economics, astronomy, time-keeping, and more. Generally, his poems are didactic: they told the ancient Greeks how to live. Between Homer’s myth-building and Hesiod’s instructional goals (not to mention his exacting detail), these poems give us a remarkable window into ancient Greece.

A vexed relationship with the past

One of the things that make Homer and Hesiod so interesting is how they negotiated their own sense of ancient and modern. Bertrand Russell writes, “The Olympian gods, who represent religion in Homer, were not the only objects of worship among the Greeks, either in his time or later. There were other darker and more savage elements in popular religion, which were kept at bay by the Greek intellect at its best.” H.J. Rose describes these elements in his Primitive Culture in Ancient Greece: there were statues of Pan, which were beaten when food was scarce; there was a cave favored by the wolf-Zeus, in which no one cast a shadow and after entering which no one survived longer than a year; there was a clan of possible werewolves. We associate ancient Greece with pure reason, but all of this was still going on in classical times.

Russell argues that “The Homeric poems, like the courtly romances of the later Middle Ages, represent the point of view of a civilized aristocracy, which ignores as plebeian various superstitions that are still rampant among the populace. . . . Guided by anthropology, modern writers have come to the conclusion that Homer, so far from being primitive, was an expurgator . . . holding up an upper-class ideal of urbane enlightenment.” That is, Homer’s works aren’t just a window into ancient Greece—they were a biased, active hand in shaping its religious customs.

We see a converse phenomenon in Hesiod, and this time the primitive customs are the Olympian myths themselves. Hesiod’s Theogony lays out Greek belief point by point, from the creation of the universe through the gods’ rise to power. The interesting part, though, isn’t what he writes—it’s how he was read. Even as the Greeks began to turn away from this mythology and seek purely rational explanations for the world, they continued to read Hesiod out of a sense of tradition: out of respect for antiquity.

It’s easy to think of the ancients as credulous, grasping at the nearest magical explanation for the phenomena around them. What we see in Homer and Hesiod, though, is a self-aware tension between past and present—one that feels very modern. Homer distances himself from ancient pagan belief to advocate for the Olympian pantheon. Hesiod fleshes out that Olympian pantheon but is, as the times change, relegated to a mere emeritus role. In many ways, the relationship of ancient Greece to its own antiquity looks like the relationship of modernity to ancient Greece. That’s what makes Homer and Hesiod so interesting: they represent not only timeless literature, but also an influential culture navigating its past and present.

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Get 61% off Hesiod, the Homeric hymns, and the Homerica

You know how important ancient Greece is—it gave us mathematics, history, philosophy, and more. (In turn, Platonism contributed to the Christianity of the early Church Fathers and, in particular, helped bring about Augustine’s conversion and some of his most interesting thought.) If you’re interested in ancient history and biblical context, ancient Greece should be part of your study.

You also know how important the Iliad and the Odyssey are: if you don’t own these masterpieces, stop reading this post, add them to your Logos library, and start enjoying them today.

But Homer’s lesser-known works—the hymns and Homerica—and Hesiod’s writings give you an especially nuanced window into ancient Greek culture. Now Noet is building these classic texts in tagged, research-friendly editions that sync with the rest of your library and give you access to Logos’ powerful study tools. Currently, Noet’s two-volume Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns and Homerica is just $7 on Community Pricing­—that’s 61% off!

Once you’ve added these important texts, you can get the big picture with one of Noet’s research libraries: the Classical Greek Bundle gives you the Iliad, Homeric GrammarLiddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon (LSJ), and more; better yet, the complete Classical Foundations Bundle gives you everything in the Classical Greek Bundle, plus essential works of philosophy, additional original-language resources, the 1,114-volume Perseus Classics Collection, and far more.

Bid on Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns and Homerica for just $7, and then pick the Noet library that’s right for you!

Get the Best Deal on a Reformed Base Package

Logos 5 Reformed

Right now, when you pick up a brand-new Reformed base package, you can save in multiple ways. Here’s how you can fit an entire library into your budget and get the best deal on the resources you love:

1. Take 15% off any Reformed base package!

Right off the bat, you can get 15% off any Reformed base package, Starter through Platinum. You’re already getting massive savings thanks to these packages’ built-in bundling discounts; for just a little while, though, you can save even more. But this special introductory price will only be available for a limited time. Use coupon code REFORMEDBP and get 15% off a brand-new Reformed base package!

2. Watch Dynamic Pricing lower your price

With Dynamic Pricing, if you already own any resources in the package you choose, they’re automatically subtracted from your final price—you get a personalized discount, and you never pay for the same resource twice. If you own even one of the resources included in the Reformed base package of your choice, your price will be lowered automatically. And the more resources you own, the lower your final price!

3. Choose the payment plan that works for you

Dynamic Pricing and your special introductory savings make Reformed base packages a spectacular deal, and interest-free payment plans make budgeting even easier. For as little as $25/month, you can bring a wealth of resources to your home, your office, and your pocket.

The larger your purchase, the more payment options you have. Depending on the package you choose, you can disperse your payments over 12 months, 18 months, or—for larger purchases—even 24 months.

Choose the Reformed base package that fits your study, and the payment plan that fits your budget.

Pick out your Reformed base package today, and take an additional 15% off!