Last Chance! Get a Massive Library for 89% Off

pre-summer-pack-300x300The Pre-Summer Pack is a superb deal: you get 60 volumes of classic theology and commentary for 89% off, which works out to less than $3 per book.

But summer’s nearly here. On Monday, June 23, at 5 p.m. (Pacific), the Pre-Summer Pack is disappearing forever.

Don’t get left out: pick up the Pre-Summer Pack for under $3 per book!

Why choose the Pre-Summer Pack?

1. It’s a remarkable value

The raw stats: the Pre-Summer Pack gives you 60 volumes, or 17,506 pages. Because it’s so large, it normally costs $1,382.56, but for just a few more days, you can get it for just $149.95. That’s 89% off, or more than $1,232.00 in savings!

Even better: if you own any of these volumes, you’ll get an additional Dynamic Pricing discount—you won’t pay for the same book twice. This makes the Pre-Summer Pack an amazing way to round out your library.

Not sure if you qualify for Dynamic Pricing? See your price right now!

2. It gives you resources you can trust

The Pre-Summer Pack focuses on writers active in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The more classic titles include Spurgeon’s Messages to the Multitude, Franz Delitzsch’s A Day in Capernaum, H.B. Swete’s The Parables of the Kingdom, and Albert Schweitzer’s Paul and His Interpreters—gems that repay modern study in spades. Newer titles include Craig Evans’ and Stanley Porter’s New Testament Interpretation and Methods, Martin Hengel’s Studies in Early Christology, James D.G. Dunn’s volume on Galatians from Black’s New Testament Commentary, Joel R. Beeke’s What Is Evangelicalism?, John Polkinghorne’s Encountering Scripture: A Scientist Explores the Bible, and much more.

All told, you’re getting some of the most interesting new scholarship and some of the most trusted classic wisdom.

Decide for yourself: see everything that’s included.

3. It makes your whole library better

Sixty volumes is a lot of content—what if you’re not sure you want that much extra reading?

With Logos, you benefit from new books whether or not you read them cover to cover:

  • A bigger library makes for richer, more contextualized searches: adding the Pre-Summer Pack populates your search results with some of the most interesting thought from the last 200 years. What pastor or scholar wouldn’t want that chance to learn?
  • The Pre-Summer Pack adds content to the Passage Guide, too. You’ll get new perspectives, both classic and modern, on almost any passage in Scripture.
  • Adding classic titles gives you access to the citations in newer resources. With the Pre-Summer Pack, you’re not just getting new scholarship—you’re getting many more live cross-references in the books you already know and love, so you can understand how they engage the ideas that came before.

Metcalfe’s Law states that the value of a network is exponentially proportional to its size—that’s why a large library is such a treasure, and why the Pre-Summer Pack is such a superb value.

See everything the Pre-Summer Pack adds to your library.

Don’t miss out on this one-time-only deal!

On Monday, June 23, at 5 p.m. (Pacific), the Pre-Summer Pack is vanishing forever.

It’s not just the deal that’s going away—it’s the product itself. You’re never going to see it again.

If you’re still on the fence, don’t forget that you can lock in your savings with an interest-free payment plan: that way, you get to 1.) take advantage of your 89% off and 2.) handle payments on your own schedule.

Don’t miss out! Pick up the Pre-Summer Pack right now, before it’s gone forever.

Get 43% Off Some of the West’s Most Important Works

the-harvard-classics-and-fiction-collectionAugustine, Plato, Homer, Dostoyevsky—for a limited time, you can get the 71-volume Harvard Classics and Fiction Collection for 43% off!

The elements of an education

Around 100 years ago, Charles Eliot, the president of Harvard, made a bold two-part claim:

  1. That one could obtain all the elements of an education in the humanities by reading a collection of books that would fit on a five-foot shelf;
  2. That one could do it with a mere 15 minutes of reading a day.

Intrigued, the publisher P.F. Collier and Son challenged him to prove it, and Dr. Eliot started compiling the West’s most important works. The resulting library is the renowned Harvard Classics and Fiction Collection.

Eliot knew his stuff: his five-foot shelf is packed with fascinating, influential titles. Here are just a few:

And here’s the full list. Poetry, prose, philosophy, drama, economics, historically important works in science and medicine—there’s no way you could read these books, even for just 15 minutes a day, and not learn.

A snapshot of the culture

Agree or disagree with their arguments, these books have been active agents in shaping the West’s worldview—we’re talking about Adam Smith and Charles Darwin and Augustine. That makes them a singularly useful resource for anyone interested in understanding our times (1 Chron. 12:32). The collection’s works of Greek philosophy help you understand the intellectual climate leading up to early Christianity. Its works of modern philosophy help you get to know some of the best-known arguments both for and against God. Its many, many intersections with theology help you separate the sophistical and the orthodox. While the collection overall isn’t Christian, it’s a great resource for cultural study.

A superb value (and a limited-time sale)

A traditional education in the humanities costs a lot—just ask any Harvard student! Right now, though, the Harvard Classics and Fiction Collection is selling for just $142.95: that’s less than one semester’s textbook budget. (Of course, tuition also pays for things like professors and classrooms; Eliot certainly understood the difference.)

If you’re an ambitious learner, the Harvard Classics and Fiction Collection is a terrific way to take charge of your ongoing education.

Start learning for 43% off: get the Harvard Classics and Fiction Collection today!

Infographic: Everything You Need to Know about John MacArthur

More than 50 years in ministry, 3,000 sermons preached, 120 books written—John MacArthur is one of the most influential theologians of our time.

Today, MacArthur turns 75. Celebrate his big day by taking 50% off more than 3,000 of his sermons and enjoying a powerful infographic that shows his life and impact!

Get 50% off 3,000+ sermons by John MacArthur

Originally $399.95get it for $199.95

MacArthur Sermon ArchiveFor a very limited time, you can pre-order the 3,127-sermon John MacArthur Sermon Archive for 50% off! The archive offers spiritual insight, biblical wisdom, and fully searchable, interlinked sermons. Covering nearly five decades’ worth of MacArthur’s ministry, it features expository preaching that illuminates the meaning of the Bible and the message of the gospel.

Plus, with the new Sermon Finder tool, building on insights from your favorite sermons is simple. The Sermon Finder lets you quickly connect any Bible verse or passage to relevant sermons from MacArthur. You’ll discover how MacArthur tackled some of the toughest verses, and you’ll enrich your study and sermons with his biblical wisdom. Pre-order the John MacArthur Sermon Archive for 50% off today!

See MacArthur’s life and impact

Thanks to Tim Challies of Challies.com, here’s a gorgeous infographic that shows you MacArthur’s life and impact.

Celebrate John MacArthur’s 75th birthday: enjoy this infographic, and then share it with friends and family!

John_MacArthur_Infographic

Image courtesy of Challies.com

Get $100 Off Spurgeon’s Works for His 180th Birthday

spurgeonCharles Spurgeon was born on June 19, 1834—180 years ago today. Learn from his legacy: use coupon code SPURGEON180 to take 20% off the Charles Spurgeon Collection. If you don’t already own any volumes in the collection, that’s $100 in savings!

Spurgeon’s road to the pulpit

When Spurgeon was 15, a snowstorm forced him to take refuge in a Primitive Methodist chapel. There he heard the passage that began his walk with God: Isaiah 45:22.

He was baptized soon after, and started teaching Sunday school. In the winter of 1850–51, he preached his first sermon. When Spurgeon was only 19, he was invited to preach at London’s famous New Park Street Chapel—at the time, the largest Baptist congregation in London. He quickly became a household name, and people traveled to hear him preach.

Persisting through trials

Along with fame came criticism. His preaching was plain-spoken and direct; not everyone appreciated his style. But, despite negative remarks, Spurgeon kept on preaching and impacting thousands.

By the end of 1856, though, tragedy stuck: while Spurgeon was preaching, someone in the crowd yelled “Fire!” The ensuing panic and stampede left several dead, and Spurgeon was devastated. The event had a deep influence on the rest of his life: he struggled with depression for many years, and even spoke of being brought to tears for no apparent reason.

But still his preaching ministry continued.

In 1861, Spurgeon’s congregation moved to the newly constructed Metropolitan Tabernacle, which seated 5,000 people and offered standing room for another 1,000. In addition to his preaching, Spurgeon founded the Stockwell Orphanage, which continued in London until it was bombed in the Second World War. (The orphanage became Spurgeon’s Child Care, which still exists today.)

Spurgeon continued to suffer from depression, in addition to a combination of rheumatism, gout, and Bright’s disease. Yet he kept preaching through June 7, 1891, less than eight months before his death.

Charles Spurgeon left a lasting impact not only on the people around him, but also on all of us who—years later—have learned from his insight.

Learn from his legacy: get $100 off his works

The Charles Spurgeon Collection gives you 86 volumes of Spurgeon’s commentaries and lectures, his autobiography, The Sword and the Trowel, and much more. It’s a terrific way to learn from his many years of teaching and pass his wisdom on to generations to come.

Learn from Spurgeon’s legacy: use coupon code SPURGEON180 and get $100 off the Charles Spurgeon Collection today!

 
P.S. Want more Spurgeon? For a limited time, you can pre-order the nine-volume Spurgeon Commentary Collection: New Testament Letters for over 40% off!

How to Unveil Obscure (and Surprising) Bible Characters in Just 5 Minutes

Do you know who Ehud is?

Me neither, before I started writing this post.

In fact, when I sat down to research him, I wouldn’t have had a clue where to start—or which resources to trust—without Logos 5. (Well, that or the Bible Study Magazine blog!) With Logos 5, though, it took only a single click to track down all the information I needed.

Five minutes later, I understood Ehud’s family tree, knew his biblical role and significance, and even had a list of clickable, relevant resources to go deeper in my research—all thanks to Logos 5’s Bible Facts tool.

Bible Facts empowers you to know biblical events, people, and places. It only draws from trusted resources, so you can be confident in your insights and your teaching. Don’t know the name of the person you’re researching? Bible Facts covers important unnamed characters, too, like the spies Joshua sent into Jericho and the Samaritan woman at the well.

Ehud

Click image to enlarge

The most exciting story you’ve never heard

Thanks to Bible Facts, I understood Ehud’s character—he was an Israeli judge whose name meant “where is the glory?” But I wanted more of his story, which turned out to be better suited for an action movie than for an obscure biblical figure.

After jumping straight to the Bible verse he’s mentioned in and reading it side-by-side with the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (just one of 24 Bible-dictionary links provided), I discovered that Ehud was a lefty whose claim to fame was plunging a fatal message from God into the belly of a king.

The story goes that while escorting Eglon, the Moabite king, to Jericho, Ehud tricked Eglon by promising a confidential revelation. Eglon foolishly dismissed his court attendants, giving Ehud (and the double-edged sword he had secretly bound to his right thigh) a private audience. As Ehud slowly ascended Eglon’s throne, he said, “I have a secret message for you, O king.” The message, it turned out, was plunging his sword all the way to the hilt into the portly king’s stomach.

Ehud snuck out of the palace and sounded his trumpet in the hills of Ephraim, calling the Israelites down to encircle the Moabite troops west of the Jordan. Under Ehud’s leadership, they killed 10,000 Moabites, freeing them from 18 years of oppression and ushering in 80 years of peace in Israel.

Not bad for an “obscure” character.

Even more insights await . . .

Finding this information was simple. Going even deeper into the story and connecting it to other resources was a breeze. Why? Because Logos 5 lifts the curtain on stories and people considered “obscure” and “mysterious” and lets you enjoy an unparalleled look at Scripture.

What’s more, Bible Facts is just one tool included in Logos 5—here are all the other tools you get.

Learn how Logos 5 equips you to be an even better student of the Word: for a limited time, get a new base package for 15% off!

Already have Logos? Take advantage of your custom upgrade discount on Logos 5 and get a deeper look at Scripture.

Get a Free Book through Community Pricing!

If you want to get amazing prices on classic resources, you can’t go wrong with Community Pricing. It’s one of the best ways to get a great deal—we’ve seen some savings of over 90%!

Check out this quick video to see how easy it is:

The cool part: your Community Pricing bid helps get more resources into Logos, and therefore helps more people discover the books they (and you) love. What’s more, there’s no risk—you can cancel your bid at any time, and your card isn’t charged until the resources ships. (We’ll even send you a reminder first.)

Try it out and get a book for free!

paul-a-servant-of-jesus-christTo help spread the word about Community Pricing, we’re giving away F.B. Meyer’s Paul: A Servant of Jesus Christ!

Here’s how to get it: simply place your bid, and—if your bid is at or above the closing price—you’ll get the book for free when it becomes available for download.

Why give away a book? Simple: because we want you to give Community Pricing a try. It’s a risk-free way to get amazing deals—check it out, get your free book, and decide for yourself!

Spread the word

Community Pricing relies on community. The more people who bid on a book or collection, the lower the price can go. So tell your friends about it, and show them how easy it is to save! Share this post on Facebook, Google+, Twitter—even on your personal blog.

Not sure what to say? You can tweet this or post this on Facebook!

Save on even more resources

Never miss another Community Pricing deal! Join the Community Pricing email list to hear about brand-new books and collections:






Get 60% Off the Classic Sermon Library Builder: That’s 7 Cents a Sermon!

Classic Sermon Builder LibraryFor a limited time, you can take 60% off the 100-volume Classic Sermon Library Builder!

It normally costs $499.95, but for a limited time, you can get it for just $199.95—that’s $300 off, or 7 cents a sermon.

This enormous collection brings together the wisdom of some of history’s greatest, most beloved pastors. It helps you create compelling sermons fast—you’ll be able to pull insights from preachers like D.L. Moody, John Wesley, George Whitefield, and others. The archive covers classic sermons from the fourth century through the twentieth, and addresses doctrinal issues, practical topics, and some of the Bible’s most difficult passages.

Plus, with Logos 5’s new Sermon Finder tool, it’s never been easier to learn from your favorite pastors. Just search for any Bible verse or passage—the Sermon Finder sweeps through your sermon archives and returns a list of all the sermons that address that verse. With the Sermon Finder and the Classic Sermon Builder Library, you can access some of the most profound pastoral insights in history.

This deal disappears on June 30, so don’t wait: get 60% off the 100-volume Classic Sermon Builder Library today!

Save big on sermon Pre-PubsD.A. Carson Sermon Library

Right now, you can get introductory savings on sermon archives from some of your favorite pastors. Here are a few sermon archives available for pre-order:

Craft powerful sermons in less time: get 60% off the Classic Sermon Library Builder, and then save on sermon-archive Pre-Pubs!

Save Time with Resources from Lexham Press

Lexham PressFor the last few years, Lexham Press has been creating resources with one goal in mind: to provide biblical content that advances scholarship and equips the church.

By helping lead the move to digital-first content, we’re offering products that are more useful than ever before. (Their value will only increase as you add more resources to your digital library.) Our aim is to create an interconnected collection of resources that, together, allow you to save time and energy.

Let’s take a look at how Lexham products can equip a pastor for better sermon preparation—or simply better study. We’ll be using three resources:

We’ll start with Philippians 2:5–11.

The origins of Philippians 2:5–11

This passage is one of the most important statements regarding Christ’s model of servanthood. A good starting point would be the discussion on the origins and different interpretations of this section. The Lexham Bible Guides are specifically designed to support this type of research. By curating all the most important interpretations and critical analyses of the text, the guide sets you up to get an overview and then choose the direction of your study.

LBG_Phil_Screenshot

What’s in a word?

Once you have your exegetical background, you’ll want to find an application that’s appropriate for your congregation. Study, Apply, Share: Philippians helps you jump-start your sermon planning with application suggestions and slides for sharing. Let’s say you decide to focus your sermon or study on obedience and submission, homing in on Jesus’ emptying of himself (Phil. 2:7).

SAS_Phil_Screenshot

The Greek verb for “to empty” will be of particular interest:

SAS_Phil_Word

A case study in submission

Now you have most of the framework for your sermon, but you want something memorable to drive your point home. The High Definition Commentary: Philippians provides this punch with professionally designed graphics.

HDC_Phil_Slide

With your application in mind—to empty ourselves means to humble ourselves in obedience to Godyou review the commentary and find just what you need for emphasis:

“It’s what Jesus does with all His power and authority: He chooses to humble Himself instead of using His divine power to assert Himself. Paul elaborates on this in 2:8. He tells us that Jesus was obedient to death. We joke about doing things ‘to death,’ but this is the real deal!”

This example shows you how Lexham Press helps you create outstanding material and free up time to pursue God’s other priorities for your life.

Save 10% this week

Start saving time today.

This week only, use the coupon code LPPHIL2014 and get 10% off the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection, Study, Apply, Share: Philippians, and the High Definition Commentary: Philippians!

New Collections from Piper, Bonhoeffer, Packer, and Others!

crossway-john-piper-collectionWe’ve recently built (or expanded) collections featuring some of your favorite authors. Thanks to Dynamic Pricing, you can add these collections and only pay for the volumes that are new to you!

Here are five of our most recently configured collections:

1. Crossway John Piper Collection

Featuring Piper’s theological works on justification and his pastoral wisdom on suffering, prayer, and perseverance, this collection from Crossway (now 39 volumes) helps pastors meet the church’s theological and doctrinal needs. Complete your collection with a special introductory discount: use coupon code PIPERCRSWAY to get 15% off until June 25!

2. Works of Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the pastor, professor, and martyr, proved to be one of the twentieth century’s leading theologians: his teachings on discipleship and ecumenism still dominate theological discussion today. This collection—now complete with volume 14—provides a comprehensive translation of his life’s writings, from his personal letters to his doctrinal dissertation to extensive coverage of his defiance of Nazi doctrine. No other work covers so much: you’ll get over 8,000 pages, most of them written by Bonhoeffer himself.

crossways-ji-packer-collection3. Crossway J.I. Packer Collection

This recently expanded collection gives you both timeless theology and practical wisdom for everyday life and ministry. For just $10 per book, you’ll get some of Packer’s most recent works—Keeping the Ten Commandments, Weakness Is the Way: Life with Christ Our Strength, Affirming the Apostles’ Creed, and more.

4. William Mitchell Ramsay Collection

W.M. Ramsay, an atheist, set out to Asia Minor to demonstrate the implausibility of the New Testament. He ended up affirming its historical integrity. This expanded 24-volume collection gives you a fascinating window into the Holy Land, unearths valuable proofs of the testimonies of Luke and Paul, and follows Ramsay’s journey from atheism to faith.

5. Baker Millard J. Erickson Collection

A leader in contemporary theology, Millard J. Erickson provides tightly argued theological teachings. Along with the latest edition of Christian Theology, this collection (now expanded to eight volumes) contains his contemporary theological books on the Godhead, eschatology, and postmodernism. You’ll see how theology is shifting during the present generation, and you’ll get a solid backdrop of core Christian teaching with which to analyze current theological trends.

 
Interested in more products like these? Leave us a comment and suggest an author!

A Behind-the-Scenes Look at William Varner’s Commentary on James

WilliamVarnerToday’s guest post is from Willam Varner, author of the volume on James in the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary. For the last 18 years, Varner has been a professor at The Master’s College and a pastor at Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, CA.

The origins of the volume

In 2008, I was invited by Stanley Porter to write a commentary on James from the perspective of discourse analysis. The project fell through, but when I finished writing, a small publisher named Kress Publications picked it up. It was a 200-page linguistic commentary that identified the peak of the book (3:13–18) and used the bipolar description of wisdom (as either from above or from below) as the book’s metatheme, conveyed by each individual paragraph.

Building on my work in that smaller commentary, I wrote the much larger EEC commentary along traditional exegetical lines.

James: passage by passage

james-evangelical-exegetical-commentaryWhat’s unique about the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary is how each commentary is structured. In my own commentary, the analysis of each pericope follows the same steps. First I present the Greek text from the NA28, taking careful note of every textual variant. Next, I offer a translation and observe how 12 different English versions, from Tyndale through the NIV11, handle the translations. Then I interpret each verse phrase by phrase, trying to interact with what other commentators have said. After that, I offer a sentence-flow analysis of the pericope, something that many commentators omit in their effort to only discuss individual words.

Having analyzed the passage from the inside out, I look at the larger biblical-theological issues in the passage and, in a separate section, draw out the practical life issues and suggest one or two homiletical outlines as sermon ideas. The final section is a bibliography of journal articles for interested readers—they go deeper into some of the passage’s most interesting issues.

As you can see, I try to leave no leaf unturned—that’s probably why the commentary is nearly 650 pages long! I think the greatest compliment I’ve received on the book was when Scot McKnight wrote that “if you have Varner’s commentary you probably won’t need another one.” Even recognizing his overstatement, I think he was saying that I have tried to offer all that can be said about each pericope of James.

I would be profoundly grateful if the commentary could be useful to scholars, students, and pastors.

* * *

Check out the new print edition of Willam Varner’s James: Evangelical Exegetical Commentary today, and—for the best deal—pick up the entire Evangelical Exegetical Commentary series!

[UPDATE 9/19/16: An announcement from Lexham Press regarding EEC James]