Great Greek Resources in Community Pricing

More and more Logos users are discovering the astronomical savings that can be found in the Community Pricing program. Just a couple of weeks ago, hundreds of users jumped in to bid on The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges (57 vols.) and ended up getting the massive collection for $50—less than a buck a book! Now that users pushed that collection over the line, its “twin” collection, the Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges is steadily creeping up in bids—and down in price.

This collection features twenty-one classic commentaries on the New Testament in Greek followed by detailed and insightful outlines, verse-by-verse interpretation, historical facts, doctrinal discussions, word studies, and more. For anyone learning Greek, these commentaries are a great place to start utilizing those new skills. For those already comfortable with the language, these classic commentaries offer solid exegesis from trusted scholars such as Alfred Plummer, H. C. G. Moule, F. W. Farrar, George Findlay, and more.

New to Community Pricing this week is the Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (21 vols.), otherwise known as “Meyer’s Commentary.” Also focused on the Greek language of the New Testament, Meyer’s commentaries were praised as “marvels of patient, laborious research,” “simply unrivalled,” “invaluable,” and “something like exegetical genius.” These commentaries are over 100 years old, but still referenced by contemporary scholars. Plugging Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer’s name into my search bar of Logos 4 brought up over a thousand hits!

If you know Greek, are learning Greek, or one day plan on studying Greek, these are resources that you’ll want to bid on today—you just can’t beat the prices found in Community Pricing.

We are constantly adding new titles in Community Pricing, and as more users discover these great deals, the faster these titles will cross the 100% mark. Using the sorting menu on top of the main Community Pricing page, be sure to select “Progress” to see which titles are gearing up to cross-over next.

Still have questions about Community Pricing? Check out this FAQ page, ask your question in the always helpful Logos forums, or leave them in the comments section!

Have you been the recipient of a great Community Pricing deal? Tell us about it!

Providing Context with the IVP New Testament Studies Collection

We often find ourselves reading through the New Testament paying little heed to context. Many times we are so focused on Scriptural application, we trudge through the Bible without fully grasping the import of contextual information. Sound exegesis and application, however, rely on having a working understanding of the cultural framework of key biblical events.

The second verse in First Corinthians begins with the words, “To the church of God that is in Corinth.” So much of the context of First Corinthians is summed up in those nine simple words. How much more enlightening would it be if we were able to approach this epistle with a greater understanding of the background and social life of Corinth?

What can we learn about the first century church by understanding the society from which it emerged? What social, cultural, or religious practices caused conflict in the early church? What were Corinth’s ethical and theological perspectives? What was life like for a first century Christian living at the crossroad where orthodox Judaism,  Hellenistic Judaism, and Greco-Roman society met?

These are precisely the kinds of questions that The IVP New Testament Studies Collection (15 vols.) answers. The IVP New Testament Study Collection brings you various socio-rhetorical analyses of the New Testament. Presented by some of the finest contemporary evangelical New Testament scholars, this collection is sure to give you an educated perspective on the lives of the first Christian believers.

The fifteen volume IVP New Testament Studies Collection not only goes far and beyond the basic information given to you within the New Testament, but also relies on historical documents and ancient texts to bring you the most clarity in understanding the context of each book.

Aside from knowledge on the lives of the early believers, you will discover the historical evidence and contemporary relevance of the New Testament. Books like Is the New Testament Reliable?  and The Making of the New Testament: Origin, Collection, Text, and Canon provide insight into how the New Testament Scriptures were written, compiled, and passed down to us and why they are infinitely trustworthy. You also get Dean Fleming’s Contextualization in the New Testament which looks deeply at how the early church contextualized the gospel for cultures they were ministering to. This knowledge greatly improves our ability to communicate the gospel message to a postmodern culture.

InterVarsity Press is known for providing engaging and thoughtful scholarship which is academic while still being accessible. Theological students, pastors, teachers, and thoughtful laypeople will all benefit from the perspective of these helpful resources.

Having these studies at your fingertips will provide the context and framework needed to take your New Testament Bible study deeper.

This collection will be shipping Friday, July 15th! Make sure to grab the IVP New Testament Studies Collection (15 vols.) while it’s still at its Pre-Pub price!

Leave us a comment and tell us which of these 15 volumes you are most excited about!

Camp Logos: The Origin of an Institution

To speak of Camp Logos is to speak of Morris “Moe” Proctor. About thirteen years ago Moe called the office to speak to me. He said, “You don’t know me, but I feel like I know you. I received a gift of Logos from a close friend. Since I have learned the program, I have been training other pastors to use Logos. I have made many sales for you of which you are unaware. I would like to speak with you about an official training relationship with Logos.”

It was the last call in the world that I expected that day.

Two years earlier I had conceived of a summer training course in the Pacific Northwest as an opportunity for us to meet and train some of our most enthusiastic users. The class would be conducted by programmers, sales people, and key users who volunteered to run workshops.

When the training course was held, it ended up being stressful but fun. We had a great time together, but there were mixed results for the various sessions. When Moe called I was still in the process of organizing the next summer event. Moe made an unexpected proposition. He suggested that he would come on his own and take over the entire teaching role for that summer’s Camp Logos. This would give us the opportunity to audition him, see him teach, and—if we were satisfied—endorse him as the official authorized Logos trainer.

You can guess how much confidence we had in our own presentation skills to instantly back down in favor of an absolute stranger who spoke with confidence on the phone. He sounded like he had it all worked out—and was ready to go. I figured he couldn’t be any worse than we were at teaching, and we would all be there anyway to provide technical correction for any misstatements he might make. To be honest, it was a relief not to be the teachers and there was always the possibility he really could teach well and advance the cause. It ended up being a huge educational experience for us.

Moe taught us our own software in a way we had never experienced before. He was amazing! He showed us the product through the eyes of a user, a preacher, and a teacher studying the biblical text. When he was done at the end of the second day, the entire room spontaneously gave him a standing ovation. This is something I had never witnessed before through college or seminary.

Moe has been the authorized Logos trainer for more than a dozen years. He has taught thousands around the world to get more out of their Bible study. I still attend Camp Logos two or three times a year and never fail to learn something new myself. He is a gifted teacher, but he is still just one person.

A while back I said to Moe, “You are doing an outstanding job, yet as a percentage, you are training less and less of our users every year. As the Logos user base continues to grow, it is getting impossible to keep up with the demand for training.” That was when we decided it was time to offer Camp Logos as a video course. I know it is not the same as a live class with live discussion, but it is the next best thing and you can go over each section at your own pace—as often as you want.

Camp Logos Live is a DVD-ROM that plays on your Mac or PC. Grab your laptop, put on Camp Logos Live, meet Moe, and enjoy learning how to get the most from Logos Bible Software.

Want to see Morris in action? Check out this video:

Have you attended a Camp Logos event? We would love to hear about it!

Honoring Stephen H. Levinsohn

Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation: A Festschrift in Honor of Stephen H. LevinsohnThis past week, Steven Runge has been at the SBL international meeting in London. Among the scholars he’s been interacting with is Stephen H. Levinsohn, a linguist affiliated with the Summer Institute of Linguistics who has done important work to advance scholarship on the Greek New Testament. Steve’s work in discourse studies has been directly influenced and enriched by Levinsohn, so he was delighted to be able to interact in person with Levinsohn at SBL in London.

At the session on Levinsohn’s work, Steve surprised Levinsohn with a book written in his honor, Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation: A Festschrift in Honor of Stephen H. Levinsohn.

This Festschrift has been in the works for awhile. We’ve been keeping it a secret for over a year, so we’re thrilled not only to present it to Levinsohn for the first time, but to also make it available to all Logos users.

In addition to Steve’s introduction, the Festschrift contains contributions from Iver Larsen, Stanley E. Porter, Robert A. Dooley, Regina Blass, R. J. Sim, Constantine R. Campbell, Buist Fanning, Steven E. Runge, Margaret G. Sim, Lindsay J. Whaley, Rick Brannan, Nicholas A. Bailey, Randall Buth, and Jenny Read-Heimerdinger.

Why are all these scholars honoring Levinsohn? Each of these scholars has had their work challenged or influenced by Levinsohn’s work, including Steve Runge’s own Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament and Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament. Levinsohn has done more than perhaps anyone else to apply the principles of discourse grammar to New Testament scholarship. He’s meticulously examined how languages operate and the rules they follow—and the implications for reading, studying, and translating the text of the New Testament.

Right now you can pre-order Discourse Studies and Biblical Interpretation at a discount for a limited time. Get it now!

Want to share how your study of the Greek New Testament been affected by Levinsohn’s work? Want to thank Levinsohn yourself? Leave a note in the comments!

Designing Women

How can I love as Jesus loved?

Does being a woman of faith mean I can’t ever have doubts?

How can I have freedom when I’m constantly busy?

Chances are most of us have thought about questions similar to these. The 13-volume Cynthia Heald Collection, now on Pre-Pub, addresses these types of questions with Bible studies that are full of Scripture and discussion questions that guide you to discovering God’s perspective on who women are designed to be.

Of the thirteen titles in this collection, nine are part of the Becoming a Woman of . . . series. These nine titles discuss several characteristics of a godly woman including prayer, grace, simplicity, and purpose.

In each of these Bible studies, you can explore biblical references, ponder quotes from authors like C. S. Lewis and Charles Spurgeon, find verses for Scripture memory that pertain to the topic, and read about real-life trials on the characteristic of the study. Discussion questions found throughout the study will prompt you to dig deeper into the Scripture and personally reflect on your own life.

Great for individual or group study! Each book has eleven chapters that can easily be used for eleven sessions for group or individual study.

Also included in this great collection are two devotionals and two Bible study books addressing marriage and the purpose and role of a godly wife. All thirteen titles will equip readers to personally apply and strengthen the characteristics discussed in each book.

With the Cynthia Heald Collection (13 vols.) on Pre-Pub, you get each title for under $6, so be sure to check it out now!

Have you read any of Cynthia Heald’s Bible studies? Let us know what you thought!

Word Biblical Commentary—Get Way More for Way Less!

The Word Biblical Commentary (WBC) is one of our bestselling commentaries. If you’ve been thinking of adding it to your library, there are two ways you could get it:

  1. Get the WBC by itself for $699.95.
  2. Get the WBC plus 141 additional books in the Nelson Bible Reference Bundle for $589.95.

The second option is a much better deal, but it’s available for just a few more days. Here’s how to get it:

Nelson Bible Reference Bundle (200 vols.)

Introducing the Nelson Bible Reference Bundle (200 vols.)

The Nelson Bible Reference Bundle is a massive collection of commentaries, Bibles, dictionaries, devotionals, popular titles, and lots more. This is what’s included:

  • 59 volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary Series (worth around $3,000.00!)
  • 35 volumes of The Preacher’s Commentary Series (worth $700.00!)
  • 12 volumes of A Treasury of Great Preaching (worth $300.00!)
  • 8 volumes of Nelson’s Annual Preacher’s Sourcebook (worth $240.00!)
  • 86 additional books and commentaries (worth $1,760.00)

The Word Biblical Commentary—and Lots More!

Right now, you could get the Word Biblical Commentary by itself on sale for $699.95. Instead, imagine getting the WBC, plus the Preacher’s Commentary Series, plus the 12-volume Treasury of Great Preaching, plus the Nelson Annual Preacher’s Sourcebook, and on top of that—almost one hundred additional books—all for $589.95. That’s 200 books—including the WBC—at a lower price than just getting the WBC by itself.

As you can see, if you’ve been thinking of getting the WBC, it makes more sense to get the 200-volume Nelson Bible Reference Bundle instead. Not only will you get the WBC, but you’ll get tons of other books, all for less than what you would pay for the WBC if you had gotten the WBC by itself.

You won’t see the discount on the product page, though. The only way to get the special price is to enter coupon code NELSONBIBLE at checkout.

Expires in Just a Few Days!

It’s hard to overstate just how good of a deal this really is. This collection contains around $6,000.00 worth of content. Right now you can get all of these books bundled together on sale, and you’ll pay only $2.95 per book. That’s 200 books, commentaries, study Bibles, dictionaries, language tools, pastor’s helps, apologetics resources, and lots more—all for only $2.95 each.

The main thing to remember is that this deal lasts until June 30, 2011. Don’t miss out on your chance to add more than 200 books to your library at around $2.95 a book! Use coupon code NELSONBIBLE to get this special price. Get it now!

How will you use the WBC in your study? Leave us a comment and let us know.

Tackling Tough Topics

Looking for information and guidance on some of today’s toughest issues?

One hundred different topics, and some of today’s most prevalent issues, are discussed in the Hope for the Heart Biblical Counseling Library. This in-depth counseling library provides practical strategies to address topics like the blended family, suicide prevention, cults, stress management, and many others.

Whether you are a regular counselor, a pastor, or just have a friend dealing with an issue, this collection will help answer your questions and give you biblically-based guidance on these subjects.

Each book discusses one topic, presented in a simple, outline format. Beginning with several definitions, you’ll gain a deeper understanding of the issue. Next, you’ll find characteristics of those dealing with the issue and then possible causes of the problem. Finally, steps to a solution that will lead to freedom in Christ are outlined. Biblical illustrations and real-life examples are given throughout each book.

And don’t forget—you can test drive the Hope for the Heart Biblical Counseling Library by purchasing the individual titles of the collection. If you want counseling tools on a specific issue, then start off by checking out that individual title. Then you may decide that the entire collection would be a great addition to your library, so we’ll deduct your recent purchase from the cost of the collection.

Here are a few individual titles to get you started:

Have you read or used any individual titles from the Hope for the Heart Biblical Counseling Library? Leave us a comment and let us know!

4 Qualities That Set the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary Series Apart

Because no one person could possibly explore the full depth of a passage of God’s Word, we here at Logos often encourage people to purchase and read multiple commentaries on a book they’re studying. Each commentary series offered for Logos’ library interprets the Bible from a different perspective. And most commentary series are intentional about what aspect of biblical interpretation they want to focus on: exegetical, pastoral, theological, application, or others. So what does the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary series (EEC) focus on?

The Ezra & Nehemiah: EEC volume by Israel Loken—which is now available—well illustrates four things that make the EEC different.

  1. The EEC is meant for a large audience
    The EEC editors—H. Wayne House, William D. Barrick, and Hall Harris—decided that the EEC audience would include the scholar, the pastor, the Sunday school teacher, and the person unfamiliar with the Bible. The EEC would address problems we all face. Ezra & Nehemiah by Loken considers problems and makes connections that are relevant no matter how deep someone’s relationship with Christ is.
  2. The EEC covers nearly all types of biblical interpretation
    Once the editors decided that the EEC would have a very wide audience, they asked: “What will make this commentary as helpful as possible?” Answering this question meant interpreting the Bible phrase by phrase from an evangelical perspective. The EEC would also incorporate the latest in biblical scholarship—combining historical, literary, and theological explanations with ideas for applying the Bible to everyday life. In Ezra & Nehemiah, Loken often discusses how the problems faced by God’s people after their exile in Babylon are not that different from the problems churches face today. He first makes this point through some biblical theology connections before connecting it to his thoughts about applying the Bible.
  3. The EEC is created for a digital world
    Digital books do not have page constraints. There is room for additional notes, excursuses on important issues, and anything else worth addressing. Loken included in Ezra & Nehemiah tables illustrating the historical events surrounding the book and interesting discussions like the literary connections between Ezra and Nehemiah.
  4. The EEC focuses on the biblical story
    Ezra & Nehemiah helps interpret the biblical story’s meaning for us. By analyzing the elements of narrative and the historical background of Ezra and Nehemiah, Loken explains how and why God’s people rebuilt Jerusalem and changed their way of worship. He continually emphasizes what we can learn about God’s story today from observing God’s story back then.

We’re not the only ones excited about Ezra & Nehemiah. In case you missed it, we published a blog post in April highlighting new endorsements for the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary by four leading biblical professors.

If you purchase the collection today you will receive the Ezra & Nehemiah volume immediately. Then, each time a new commentary is released, it will automatically download into your library at no additional cost.

Also, you can order the 44 volume, Evangelical Exegetical Commentary using a payment plan and spread those payments out for up to a year!

Do you already have the Ezra & Nehemiah volume in your collection? Leave us a comment and let us know what you think!

Reflecting on Three Years of Bible Study Magazine

God’s Word has the power to do more in someone’s life than we could ever hope to do on our own. For that reason—before Bible Study Magazine was announced about three years ago—the decision was made that it would be all about the Word.

Using the print medium for this purpose was indeed a simple technology solution. We came to the conclusion that print would serve this purpose well: it was a great medium for presenting fresh ideas about Bible study.

Bible Study Magazine is still all about getting people into the Word. We are grateful for the opportunity to publish the words of people who share our passion, like Priscilla Shirer. In the current issue, Shirer says: “The exact same Holy Spirit that lives in the people we admire, who teach us the Bible, is the exact same Holy Spirit that lives inside of us. … [We can’t] only hear the voice of God when somebody else is spoon feeding it to us. We have to know that we can go to the Scriptures ourselves.”

This idea is embodied by Dr. Yohanna Katanacho. As a Palestinian by birth who now lives in Israel, he shares the gospel with those struggling with ethnic and national boundaries. Through relationships, he often has the ability to demonstrate that Christ can overcome all things. He has been a missionary in the conflict of hatred for most of his life, yet he doesn’t seem discouraged by it—the Word of God helps him with the disappointments and enables him to experience victories. Katacacho’s story is both empowering and convicting. He prompts us to be anything but passive in our faith: He tells the story of how the Bible has transformed his life and continually been his guide. “For me, the Bible is the source of my strength,” says Katacacho, “without it I would be lost, not only because of the cognitive part, but because it is a holy ground for me. There I meet God, and through that meeting, I am refreshed.”

But as Sheila Walsh says in our current issue: “Sometimes we have a hard time resting in God’s promises because so many earthly promises are broken. But while we disappoint others and they disappoint us, God is not like us: ‘God is not human that he should lie, not a human being that he should change his mind. Does he speak and then not act? Does he promise and not fulfill?’ (Numbers 23:19).”

God is here for us. He has provided the “holy ground” of His Word so that we can rest peacefully in Him. When we look to His Word, we see His promises. Bible Study Magazine is about how God is manifest in His Word and wants to manifest His Word in our lives.

I hope you decide to subscribe now to Bible Study Magazine for yourself, a family-member, or a friend. (To gift a subscription, just enter a different shipping address at check out.) We would be grateful for the opportunity to help you or someone you know get deeper into the Word.

Have you subscribed to Bible Study Magazine? We would love for you to tell us about it!

5 Interesting Facts About John Wesley

John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, turns 308 today. Like any looming figure in Christian history, Wesley has his share of both theological supporters and detractors. But there are very few that will question the fervency and urgency Wesley felt when it came to evangelism and church work. As Prime Minister, Lord Baldwin, said of Wesley, “I am supposed to be a busy man, but by the side of Wesley, I join the ranks of the unemployed.”

To celebrate Wesley’s birthday, I wanted to take a few moments and look at five little known facts about his life.

    1. John Wesley came from a huge family.
      The child mortality rate in eighteenth century England was unbelievably high. Statistics suggest that 70% of all deaths were children under ten. So it is not surprising that many families had an abundance of children. John Wesley’s mother—Susanna Wesley—was the 25th of 25 children and she went on to bear a number of children as well. John was the 15th of 19 children. Susanna lost nine of her children in infancy. When Susanna died in 1742, she was only survived by eight of her children.
    2. John Wesley was a victim of bullying as a child.
      John, a short and intelligent boy, was bullied relentlessly as a child. This abuse affected him for the rest of his life. Accounts tell of how, as an adult, Wesley would tremble when discussing the barbaric treatment he received from his peers.
    3. John Wesley vehemently opposed slavery.
      Wesley was inspired to join the anti-slavery movement when he read a pamphlet by Quaker abolitionist Anthony Benezet. He was so moved that he frequently preached against the slave trade and authored Thoughts upon Slavery—a pamphlet publicly decrying the practice. Wesley’s last letter was written to convert and fellow abolitionist William Wilberforce. In it he wrote:

      “O be not weary of well doing! Go on, in the name of God and in the power of his might, till even American slavery (the vilest that ever saw the sun) shall vanish away before it.”

      This letter was written in 1791, and sixteen years later Parliament finally outlawed England’s participation in the slave trade.

    4. John Wesley is one of history’s most traveled men.

Biographer Edward T. Oakes states that Wesley traveled over 250,000 miles by horseback in his lifetime—that’s ten times the circumference of the earth.

    1. John Wesley is credited for coining the phrase “agree to disagree.”

Wesley often found himself at odds with George Whitefield. Whitefield, who shared Wesley’s enthusiasm for evangelism, clashed openly with Wesley on issues of soteriology. Eventually, the rivalry between Wesley and Whitefield’s theologies introduced an impassioned partisanship among their followers.

In a memorial sermon delivered after Whitefield’s passing, Wesley minimized the schism saying:

There are many doctrines of a less essential nature . . . In these we may think and let think; we may agree to disagree. But, meantime, let us hold fast the essentials . . .

This sermon is widely recognized as the first time “agree to disagree” appeared in print.

Get the Faithlife Study Bible—for free!

More insights like this are waiting for you in the Faithlife Study Bible—the world’s largest study Bible. And it’s totally free—get it now!

FSB_facebook_centered