Black Friday 2011: Don’t Miss This Sale!

Are you looking for some Black Friday bargains? Look no further! We have sales on bundles, collections, and base packages running through Monday, November 28!

But that’s not all! We are also giving away $250 in Logos cash to 5 winners! Keep reading for details on how to enter.

Black Friday Bundles

We have created 4 amazing Black Friday bundles for you:

The Black Friday Master Bundle (160 vols.)

This is the largest bundle and the best deal we’re offering for Black Friday. But this deal is only available during this sale—after Monday, the price goes up.

The Black Friday Master Bundle is packed with new releases, standard reference sets, bestsellers, top commentaries, and more. We pulled together some of the best content we have and are offering them at one incredible price.

You’ll get books by today’s top scholars:

These are only a few of the names available in the Black Friday Master Bundle’s 160 volumes. With the Black Friday Master Bundle, you get an entire bookshelf full of top-quality resources for you digital library!

Incredible Savings!

If you were to buy all these books in print, you would spend over $6,400. Even if you bought these books on Logos.com any other week of the year, you would have to pay more than $4,000. Now you can get the Black Friday bundle for only $999.95. That’s saving over 85%! But this sale is only good through Monday, November 28.

3 More Black Friday Bundles!

We broke the Black Friday Master Bundle into 3 smaller bundles:

  • The Black Friday New Testament Bundle (50 vols.): $329.95—80% off
  • The Black Friday Reference Bundle (38 vols.): $399.95—81% off
  • The Black Friday Old Testament Bundle (72 vols.):  $499.95—82% off

If you’ve been considering getting only a few of the books in the collection, you can spring for one of the smaller Black Friday bundles instead. For example:

  • The JPS Tanakh Commentary Collection is $379.95 by itself, or for $120 more, you can get the The Black Friday Old Testament Bundle which features the JPS Tanakh Commentary Collection—and 63 additional books.
  • The 5-volume Encyclopedia of Christianity is $349.95 by itself, or for only $50 more, you can get the The Black Friday Reference Bundle, which includes the Encyclopedia of Christianityplus 32 additional reference works!

These bundles feature incredible savings, but remember the Black Friday Master Bundle is going to get you the most material at the best possible price. With the Black Friday Master Bundle, you will save over $200 off the price of all the other bundles together.

Enormous Deals on Popular Picks!

As if that wasn’t enough, we are offering rock-bottom pricing on some of our most popular collections. This weekend you can save big on collections like:

15% Off of Base Packages

Last, but certainly not least, buy any of our base packages at 15% off using the coupon code SAVE15. Logos base packages are still the best deals. With a base package, you get the most resources at the greatest possible value already—and that’s before you take another 15% off the price!

Enter to Win a $250 Logos Cash!

Yes, you read that right. We are going to give a $250 Logos cash to 5 winners! 

You don’t have to spend a thing to get your name in the drawing! Simply head over to Logos.com/BlackFriday to enter.

Take a look at the great deals we are offering at Logos.com/BlackFriday. We’re pretty sure you’ll be as excited as we are. And remember to enter our huge giveaway while you’re there. You could be one of the 5 people with $250 Logos cash!

Logos Teams Up with Zondervan for a #DailyDeal

This Daily Deal Has Expired! Keep Following Us on Twitter for More Daily Deals!

Those of you that follow us on Twitter know that our #DailyDeal program features a special 50% off deal every day of the week.

Today we are partnering with Zondervan to feature 1001 Illustrations that Connect, a powerful resource for preachers, teachers, and writers. Now you can add this collection of powerful illustrations—culled from Christianity Today‘s popular website Preaching Today.com—to your Logos 4 resources for 50% off using the coupon code DD5423 !

Make Sure You Don’t Miss Out on Future #DailyDeals!

After you pick up 1001 Illustrations that Connect,  make sure you get all of the great deals we have coming your way!

Here’s how:

  1. You’ll want to follow us on Twitter. You’ll need a Twitter account, or you can import our Twitter feed into a reader via RSS.
  2. Watch our Twitter feed each weekday, and keep an eye out for the “#DailyDeals” hashtag. This marks a 50% off, one-day-only sale!
  3. In order to take advantage of the #DailyDeal, you’ll need to click on the link to the order screen.
  4. Once you’ve clicked on the link, enter the coupon code. In this case, the code is “DD5423”, as show below.
  5. Proceed through the purchase.  Now you’re on your way to enjoying great reading and studying material!

Share #DailyDeals with Your Friends!

Sharing these great deals with your friends and followers is really easy! Simply click ‘retweet’ so all of your friends on Twitter can get in on the deal, too!

So pick up your copy of 1001 Illustrations that Connect  at 50% off, and  make sure you check out tomorrow’s #DailyDeal!

A Case for Theological Journals

If you have spent any amount of time doing serious Bible study or research you have inevitably run into references to articles contained in theological journals. These journals are on the cutting edge of biblical scholarship, containing fresh research, insight into key theological topics, and exegesis of the Biblical text.

But too often when you want to take your studies further, you find that these journals are housed in some far-off Bible college or university. And if you wanted to order a subscription to a specific journal you’ll soon find that you may have to put off eating for a month–some of these journals can cost well over a hundred dollars for just four issues! But do not despair! With the Theological Journal Library, vol. 14 now on Pre-Pub, Logos has brought those distant libraries filled with theological journals right into the comfort of your own home.

The Need for Theological Journals

Where a Bible commentary may take up to 10 years or more to be published, journal articles tend to be published more quickly. Also, with commentaries there is often a set page limit that constrains the author to stick to the big picture while theological journals step in and go deeper into textual issues.

This freedom keeps theological journals on the cutting edge of scholarship. Often this scholarship is more specialized, focusing on issues of grammar, cultural background, or theology of a particular passage or passages of Scripture. Having access to theological journals in your Logos library is like bringing a research library into your personal place of study and allowing you to study the Bible in a more enriching manner.

Theological Journals in Logos 4

If you are a Logos user, then you know how incredible it is to have a software program that searches your entire library in a matter of seconds. In the same way you search the Bible for a particular word, phrase, or verse, you can also just as quickly search through your theological journals for any reference or verse. And when you click on a Scripture reference in your journal, Logos quickly navigates to that Bible verse. This speeds up your study and gives you more time to research—and who doesn’t want that?

Considering the amount of scholarship contained in theological journals and the speed and power of Logos 4, Theological Journal Library, vol. 14 is an invaluable addition to your library. And with the incredible Pre-Pub price of $49.95, now is the time to add it to your library and take your Bible study to an even deeper level.  And while you’re at it, check out some of these other journals that Logos has to offer!

Apostolic Fathers: Clement’s Use of the Bible

More Information on the Apostolic Fathers InterlinearOne reason I wanted to make the Apostolic Fathers Interlinear was because the writers of these documents used the Old Testament, New Testament, and even some portions of apocryphal/deuterocanonical books. These guys knew Scripture, and they used Scripture (and some related writings) in their writings.

Clement of Rome (First Clement is attributed to him, Second Clement is traditionally attributed to him though most today do not view Clement as its author) is exceptional in his use of the OT and NT. He uses large portions of Scripture to the point where they can even be useful for text-critical purposes. Did you know that 1Clem 18 is a quotation of Psalm 51, and that it largely reflects the text of the Septuagint as we have it today? And that there is a large chunk of Isaiah 53 in 1Clem 16? And that Clement also quotes from Proverbs and even Job? And that some portions sound like they’re coming straight from Hebrews (e.g. 1Clem 36) and that he probably has familiarity with some of Paul’s epistles—especially First Corinthians?

Further, there is a simply incredible prayer in 1Clem 59–61. You have to read it. Really. And trust me, it reads even better if you read it aloud!

And let’s not forget Second Clement (also known as “An Early Christian Homily”) which is essentially a sermon that uses portions of Isaiah 54 as its primary text. This is the earliest Christian sermon available outside of the New Testament, and  you can read it. Really! And it is awesome from its very start.

New Testament in the Apostolic FathersThis is all well and good, but why an interlinear and not a translation if I’m interested in folks really using this stuff? Well, I wanted to make something that folks who had some Greek and who find themselves using lexicons like BDAG could use to help them into the Greek text of this secondary material. Something people could search for Greek words and phrases, and see how they were used outside of the New Testament. Working on the Apostolic Fathers Interlinear was a lot of work, but it was also incredibly rewarding. I hope you’ll find it similarly helpful in your studies.

Here’s an extra bonus tip: If you’re interested in the Apostolic Fathers’ use of the New Testament, Logos has a neat book published in the early 1900′s called The New Testament in the Apostolic Fathers.  This book lists possible quotations and allusions to the New Testament in most of the works of the Apostolic Fathers (Barnabas, Didache, I Clement, Ignatius, Polycarp, Hermas, and II Clement). It is very helpful for looking into possible use of the NT in the Apostolic Fathers.

Get Influential Classics by Herman Witsius

At the age of 15, Herman Witsius began attending the University of Utrecht and at age 21, Witsius was ordained in the ministry. Soon after, Witsius served at several churches as the pastor and at several Universities as professor of divinity.

And now, several of Witsius’ titles are available in the Herman Witsius Collection (11 vols.) for just $89.95 on Pre-Pub.

Included in the Herman Witsius Collection is his most popular work, The Economy of the Covenants between God and Man, a systematic exploration of Old Testament law, New Testament grace, the grace of God in both covenants, and how Christ fulfills each covenant. The Economy of the Covenants between God and Man is considered one of the core writings that helped develop covenant theology. Other important works in this collection include his 2-volume commentary on the Apostles’ Creed, Sacred Dissertations on the Lord’s Prayer, and other essays on a variety of topics.

Author and theologian J. I. Packer said Witsius was a “master Dutch Reformed theologian, learned, wise, mighty in the Scriptures, practical . . . on paper he was calm, judicious, systematic.”

Biblical scholar John Gill stated that Witsius was a “writer not only eminent for his great talents and particularly solid judgments, rich imagination, and elegance of composition, but for a deep, powerful, and evangelism spirituality, and savor of godliness.”

Be sure to pick up the Herman Witsius Collection (11 vols.) while it’s on Pre-Pub for just $89.95!

Discover How to Read the Bible Wisely

“Blessed is the one who finds wisdom, and the one who gets understanding, for the gain from her is better than gain from silver and her profit better than gold.”—Proverbs 3:13-14

What does wisdom say about reading the Bible?

In Reading the Bible Wisely, Richard Briggs answers this question by providing an approach to biblical interpretation that takes both wisdom and the Scriptures seriously. You will explore the reasons why we read the Bible in the first place, methods of interpretation that consider its historical, literary, and theological dimensions, and what role the Bible should have in our lives as the people of God.

Reading the Bible Wisely also explores how Scripture and the transformed mind of the believer interact to illuminate the process of interpretation. With the Logos Bible Software edition, every scripture reference is linked to your preferred Bible translation, allowing you to put the interpretive principles into practice right away—without losing your place in either book!

Learn how to wisely study the Word by picking up Reading the Bible Wisely on Pre-Pub now for only $13.95!

What do you think are some of the most important things to remember when reading the Bible? Leave us a comment below!

Recommended Commentaries: Joshua

Logos Talk’s Recommended Commentary Series highlights some favorite commentaries by Logos academics and the user community.

We Want to Hear from You!

Each week we will post a forum thread asking which commentaries, available from Logos, are your favorites for a specific book in the Bible. This is a great opportunity to let other Logos users know which commentaries you have found valuable in your studies.

Joshua Commentaries

We asked Hebrew Language Specialist Josh Westbury to give us his favorite commentaries on Joshua. Here are a few of his choices in no particular order:

Logos Community Favorites

Here are a few commentaries suggested by Logos users:

Do you have a favorite Logos resource on Joshua which isn’t listed here? Leave us a comment. Then jump over to the forum and share your favorite commentaries on Judges!

Don’t miss other posts in the Recommended Commentary Series!

Community Pricing Alert: Classic Commentaries and Studies Series

In less than a week, Classic Commentaries and Studies on Genesis (22 vols.) is set to ship. It’s the first in our Classic Commentaries and Studies series to ship, and you don’t want to miss out on the others coming down the Community Pricing pipeline:

These collections contain some the best authors of classic scholarship, including John Skinner, Moses Stuart, S. R. Driver, S. P. Tregelles, Philip Schaff, William Kelly, Morris Jastrow, and more! These collections offer a great way to bulk up your library with solid content without breaking the bank.

And remember, you can change your bid at any time. Raise it, lower it, or cancel it—you’re in control. So why not place a bid right now? Make sure you’re in on these incredible savings before they leave Community Pricing.

Happy Birthday, Martin Luther

November 10, 2011 marks 528 years since the birth of Martin Luther, an iconic figure in the Protestant Reformation. You can add the entire 55-volume collection of Luther’s works to your library at a special introductory price. But act soon—this introductory price ends on November 14.

Regarding Luther

Many people know that Luther was a catalyst for the Protestant Reformation and how he nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the Castle Church of Wittenberg. Here are some facts you might not know:

  • The Legend of Luther’s Conversion

    There are many legends surrounding how Luther went from being a promising law student to a monk in 1502. The most popular story involves being caught in a terrible thunderstorm and how, after many close calls with lightning strikes, Luther vowed to become a monk in exchange for his life.

    Another story has Luther falling on a dagger, severing an artery, and making his vow of conversion under the fear of death. There is even a story about how Luther was sent to a monastery after killing a fellow student in a duel.

    We may never know the truth, but we do know that his decision to leave the practice of law and embrace religion was a drastic and swift change in direction.

  • The Pivotal Point in Luther’s Life

    Luther did not consider the nailing of his theses to the Castle Church door the most critical event in his life. In his Table Talks, Luther points to the illumination he felt when understanding Romans 1:17: “For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith for faith, as it is written, “The righteous shall live by faith.”

    Luther often speaks of this—his “Tower Experience”—as his true moment of conversion.

  • Luther’s Actual Words at the Imperial Diet of Worms

    Luther was invited to an Imperial Diet (general assembly of the Imperial Estates) in Worms, Germany. The intention was to encourage Luther to repent and recant of his heresies. Luther, refusing to recant, is often credited as saying, “Here I stand. I cannot do otherwise.”

    Luther’s actual statement to the assembly was much more articulate:

    “Unless I am convinced by Scripture and plain reason—I do not accept the authority of the popes and councils, for they have contradicted each other—my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and I will not recant anything for to go against conscience is neither right nor safe. God help me. Amen.”

Purchase Luther’s Works today!

Luther is one of the most significant figures in Western history, and now you can add this massive 55-volume collection to your Logos resources. That’s more than 22,000 pages of exposition and commentary on Scripture, theological writings, and other materials readily accessible with your other resources—perfect for personal or academic study.

But don’t wait, this special introductory price ends on November 14, 2011. Order yours today!

The Great Texts of the Bible Is Shipping Soon

The thirteen-volume Great Texts of the Bible will be shipping soon. It isn’t too late to get these commentaries, essays, and sermons while they are still 40% off of the retail price!

James Hastings, compiler of the Great Texts of the Bible, was a Presbyterian minister, theologian, and editor of many large volumes of Biblical works, including the Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics (13 vols.). Hastings’ conducted most of his exhaustive editing work while he pastored. He retired in 1911.

Take a peek under the hood of the The Great Texts of the Bible (20 vols.), to see the incredible content in this collection!

“Is there any reason why we should be afraid of saying that the universal love of Jesus Christ, which gathers into His bosom all mankind, does fall with special tenderness and sweetness upon those who have made Him theirs and have surrendered themselves to be His? Surely it must be that He has special nearness to those that love Him; surely it is reasonable that He should have special delight in those who try to resemble Him; surely it is only what one might expect of Him that He should in a special manner honor the drafts, so to speak, of those who have confidence in Him, and are building their whole lives upon Him.”—St. John 13–21, The Love of Jesus for His Own

“Now we here have the great truth of a suffering Messiah, a suffering Redeemer, brought out in all its fullness as we have it nowhere else in the Old Testament. The details are so striking that we cannot wonder that again and again this passage is quoted in the New Testament, as having its fulfillment in Christ.”—Isaiah, Vicarious Healing

“For what is enthusiasm? It is a Greek word which means the fullness of Divine inspiration. It implies absorbing and passionate devotion for some good cause. It means the state of those whom St. Paul has described as “fervent (literally ‘boiling’) in spirit.” It describes the soul of a man no longer mean and earthly, but transfigured, uplifted, dilated by the Spirit of God.”—Romans 9–16, Outward, Inward, Christward

The Great Texts of the Bible is full of soul-stirring reflections and teaching which stretch across the entire canon of Scripture. You will find lifetime of encouragement within The Great Texts’ 9,700 pages.

Order your copy today, and take advantage of the low Pre-Pub pricing!

Then head over and bid on Hastings’ Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics (13 vols.). It is currently trending at about $30, but with enough orders this thirteen-volume collection can go even lower!