The C.S. Lewis Sale Is Soon Returning to the Wardrobe

Dear reader,

You’ll forgive me for a rather silly, on-the-nose way of telling you my sale is ending soon.

And it’s not my sale, of course (by the way, isn’t ‘sale’ a ho-hum word? How about ‘party’ or ‘rollick’?) but rather one on things I wrote long ago.

It doesn’t contain all I’ve ever written, but a good deal of works people seem to quite enjoy, such as:

  • Mere Christianity
  • The Screwtape Letters
  • A Grief Observed

It also has some works people know little about but that I spent quite a lot of time on, such as:

  • Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (I was a professor, after all)
  • My Collected Letters
  • Christian Reflections

(Isn’t it funny how many hours of one’s life can go unnoticed, especially when those hours were given to the things and people they cared most about? I’m speaking here of my letters, mostly.)

All that to say, these are my offerings, and Logos is currently offering my offerings for 30% off—until midnight Monday, they tell me.

They also tell me these works all interconnect somehow, and that you can read them without really reading them yourself. You just look up a Bible passage or topic in the “computer,” and if I ever wrote anything helpful on it, my words will suddenly appear. Sounds like something from the White Witch, but they assure me it’s deeper magic.

Yours,

Jack

***

Thank you for joining us for the C.S. Lewis week. You can get the 30-vol. C.S. Lewis Collection 30% off until midnight on Monday, Sept. 24.

 

For more posts about Lewis, see below:

9 Shareable C.S. Lewis Quotes

4 Ways C.S. Lewis Can Shape Your Faith: Insights from a Scholar

3 Simple Reasons You Can’t Dismiss Miracles in the Bible

The Only Three Kinds of Things Anyone Need Ever Do

C.S. Lewis: A Lutheran Appreciation

Why We Do What We Do: C.S. Lewis on Motivation

On Misquoting C.S. Lewis (and Knowing an Author’s Voice)

Our 12 Favorite C.S. Lewis Quotes: Faithlife Staff Picks

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This repost from Faithlife staff member Mark Ward previously appeared in March 2018. It reflects on what it means to know C.S. Lewis’ voice—or any other, such as God’s—well enough to discern it by instinct. [Read more…]

Not All Harps and Halos: Learn What the Bible Really Says about Angels

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That may sound harsh, but most of us get our perspective of angels from movies, myths, and Valentine’s Day cards—not as much from the Bible.

In his new book, Angels, Dr. Michael Heiser carefully reviews what the Bible says—and what it doesn’t say—about the heavenly host. [Read more…]

Men Without Chests: Lewis, Relativism, and the Soul of Christianity

 

It’s C.S. Lewis week here at Faithlife! We’re celebrating the scholar’s life and writings, and with that, discounting the 30-volume C.S. Lewis Collection for one week only. This is a post from Faithlife staff member Daniel Motley reflecting on Lewis’ warnings against relativism. [Read more…]

Christianity Is the Poem Itself: C.S. Lewis on the Grand Miracle

“In science we have been reading only the notes to a poem; in Christianity we find the poem itself.”       — C.S. Lewis

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Enjoy this excerpt as part our week-long celebration of C.S. Lewis’ life and writings, and get Miracles and 29 other works in the C.S. Lewis Collection—30% off for just a few more days. [Read more…]

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C.S. Lewis’ Ingenious Apologetic of Longing

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For C.S. Lewis, the acclaimed Christian apologist and author, a permanent sense of longing characterized his deepest held beliefs about Christianity. He identified this feeling with the idea of sehnsucht, a German word meaning “longing” or “desire.” Sehnsucht appeared in many of Lewis’ favorite works of literature, including Norse mythology, the poems of Wordsworth, and the children’s stories of George Macdonald. It was “that unnameable something, desire for which pierces us like a rapier at the smell of a bonfire, the sound of wild ducks flying overhead, the title of The Well at the World’s End, the opening lines of Kubla Khan, the morning cobwebs in late summer, or the noise of falling waves.”
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