The Logos Blog Turns 3!

Three years and 700 posts later . . .

The Logos blog officially launched on July 29, 2005. If my math is correct, that means that today is our 3rd birthday! No need to buy us any presents, but you’re welcome to buy yourself one if you want. :)

Looking Back

Over the past three years we’ve blogged just about every weekday with a few misses here and there. On an interesting note, yesterday’s blog post was our 700th.

As a quick recap, I thought you might enjoy seeing some of the most viewed posts.

According to Google Analytics, here are the 5 posts with the most pageviews:

  1. Try Out the Pre-Pub Program—and Get a Free Book!
  2. The Lifework of Dr. Jim Rosscup
  3. The Secret to Beating the Postage Increase
  4. Free Sermons in Your Bible Software
  5. New Bible Widget for Mac

According to FeedBurner, here are the 5 posts with the most RSS views:

  1. Learn Logos Bible Software
  2. Understanding Data Types: Definitions
  3. Doing Things Faster with the Keyboard, Part 1
  4. Doing Things Faster with the Keyboard, Part 2
  5. Logos in the Blogosphere

Looking Forward

We’re in the process of upgrading the blog from Movable Type 3.2 to 4.2. We hope to roll out a new look with some cool new features very soon, so stay tuned for an even better Logos blog.

We value your input as we move forward. Feel free to share your suggestions for things you’d like to see us incorporate. We’d also love to hear what kinds of posts you find most helpful. What would you like to see us do more of? What could you do without? In short, what can we do to make the blog an ever better tool to keep you informed and help you get the most out of your Bible software? Let us know by leaving a comment or sending an email to blog@logos.com.

Logos at the 60th Annual ETS Meeting

The 60th annual Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) meeting, which is on the subject of Text and Canon, is right around the corner. The event will be held in Providence, Rhode Island on November 19-21, 2008. The tentative schedule is now up at the ETSJETS website. Three people from Logos will be presenting papers.

On Wednesday November 19, Mike Heiser will be moderating the papers on the topic of Israelite Religions in Room 551 B of the Rhode Island Convention Center. At 11:00 AM-11:40 AM he will present “The Concept of a Godhead in Israelite Religion.”

On Thursday Steve Runge and Rick Brannan will present back to back, also in Room 551 B. The theme of the papers is Discourse Grammar and Biblical Exegesis. Steve presents at 10:10 AM-10:50 AM. The title of his paper is “‘I want you to know . . .’ The Exegetical Significance of Meta-comments for Identifying Key Propositions.” At the 11:00 AM-11:40 AM session, Rick will give his paper on “The Discourse Function of αλλα in Non-negative Contexts.”

If you’re planning to attend and any of these papers pique your interest, mark them on your calendar. We’ll also have a booth set up. If you’re there, swing by and say hello. We always love to meet our users.

The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity

Today’s blog post was written by Kirk Fengel, the newly appointed facilitator of the Logos Lecture Series.

Our next Logos Lecture Series event will feature Dr. Nicholas Perrin of Wheaton College, who will be speaking on “The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity.” Make a point of joining us at 7:00 PM on Friday, July 25, at The American Museum of Radio and Electricity here in Bellingham, Washington.

About the Lecture

If the fairly recent buzz over The Da Vinci Code is any indication, it appears that gnostic thought continues to hold a certain fascination in western culture. One of the most important early (so-called) gnostic texts, the Gospel of Thomas, has also attracted its own fair share of popular and scholarly attention, repeatedly prompting the question as to whether this gospel gives us undiscovered words of Jesus. This lecture will deal both with the scholarly controversy and the speaker’s original research on the significance of the Gospel of Thomas within early Christianity.

About the Speaker

Dr. Nicholas Perrin is the author of such fine books as Thomas: The Other Gospel, The Judas Gospel, and Questioning Q, among others, and has also authored many definitive papers and articles. He has extensively researched the Gospel of Thomas, historical Jesus, Paul and Jewish self-definition, and the Gospels. Dr. Perrin holds a Ph.D. from Marquette University, M.Div. from Covenant Theological Seminary, and B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and now serves as Assistant Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College.

Event Details

  • Title: “The Gospel of Thomas in Early Christianity”
  • Speaker: Dr. Nicholas Perrin of Wheaton College
  • Date: Friday, July 25
  • Time: 7:00-8:00 PM
  • Location: The American Museum of Radio and Electricity in Bellingham, Washington.

For those who are unable to attend the lecture we should have the audio available within a few days of the event. Please check the Lecture Series page for updates.

Free Downloads, Applications, and More!

We offer several free tools and applications in addition to our Libronix engine and decided that it was time to put them all together in one easy-to-access place.

If you’re relatively new to Logos, you may not know about things like NoteScraps, Shibboleth, Global Bible Reader, RefTagger, our Bible Widget, or the What the Bible Says About website.

Head over to https://www.logos.com/downloads and check them out.

Chili Cook-Off 2008!

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, who works in the marketing department here at Logos.

A few weeks ago, I started renting and watching HBO’s John Adams. It has been an interesting and exciting series to watch. I chose the optional facts-popups to display during the episodes in order to learn about the underlying facts that are relevant to the scene, and have to say that I have found a new patriotism welling within me. Not wanting to miss further facts, I went down to my local library and checked out the book John Adams by David McCullough, on which the movie was based, in order to learn more about our founding fathers and what it was like for them to gain the freedom and independence we celebrated this holiday weekend. Before shutting our doors here at Logos in order to celebrate Independence Day, we went out with a bang (of-sorts) of our own—our annual Chili Cook-Off.

Twenty chilies lined the kitchen wall by noon, each with its distinct sign, smell, taste, and toppings. It is rumored that one contestant wanted to see how well an out-of-the-can chili would fare against the homemade chilies and so he heated up canned chili.

One surprising entrant in the cook off was Sarah Knepper, a Logos employee for all of three days! She is a welcomed addition to the graphics/marketing department and is clearly not intimidated around here. Nor is our Bible Study Magazine editor, John Barry. His Mama Victoria’s Turkey Chili took home the win by a landslide. If his chili is in any way a foreshadowing of the magazine, we are in for an amazing treat come September. Bringing in the second place trophy was Jerry Godfrey, manager of customer service and organizer of this year’s event. Third place went to D&E’s Johnny Cisneros.

If recipes become available, we’ll be sure to share them.

A Bidding Strategy for Community Pricing

The Community Pricing Program has made many bidders happy by allowing them to add top-notch public domain titles to their digital libraries for just a few bucks per book. The recent St. Paul and Justification is a perfect example of how low prices can go. Hundreds of people picked it up for a mere $3—far less than the cost of a gallon of gas in most places. (Regular unleaded is about $4.50/gallon here in Bellingham.)

But not everyone gets in on deals like these. Almost as many people bid too low and miss out. The bad news comes in an email something like this:

Your community pricing bid of $4.00 for Calvin and the Reformation: Four Studies [DOWNLOAD] was not successful.

The final community price for this product is $6.00.

You can still place a Pre-Pub order for this product by visiting https://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/4205

Thank you for your interest in this product!

A customer wrote in to one of our CS reps disappointed that his bid of $4.00 for Calvin and the Reformation was not successful, wondering if it was too late for him to raise his bid to $6 rather than buying it at the Pre-Pub price of $14.95 (which, by the way, is still a good price compared to the cost of the print volume). Unfortunately, once a book leaves Community Pricing, it is no longer possible to pre-order it at that price.

If this has ever happened to you (or if you want to make sure that it doesn’t), then this post is for you. With this simple bidding strategy, you’ll never miss out on a Community Pricing title again.

What a lot of people do is bid the lowest possible price, but that’s generally a bad idea for a few reasons:

  1. No book has ever crossed the 100% mark at the lowest price.
  2. Bids that are too low don’t help move the title any closer to production.
  3. Worst of all, they put you in the prime place to miss out on the deal altogether.

Here’s the strategy that I recommend. Never bid the lowest price. Don’t even bid the highest price that you think you’d be willing to pay. Like the individual who missed out on Calvin and the Reformation, you’re probably usually willing to go up a little higher—a much better option than having to pay the higher Pre-Pub price. Here’s my recommendation: if you’re interested in a title, always bid somewhere above the midpoint.

Your first response may be that you’re not willing to pay that much money for the book. That’s okay. You won’t have to. Keep three things in mind:

  1. Every book has crossed the 100% at the midpoint or lower and usually goes even lower, and no matter how high above the crossover point you bid, you always get the lowest price that covers production costs (e.g., if you bid $20, and it crosses over at $5, you get it for $5, not $20).
  2. By bidding above rather than below the crossover point, you’ll drive the price even lower.
  3. You can always remove your bid or cancel your pre-order if you’re convinced that it’s not worth the final price.

The moral of the story is that if you bid high you’ll never miss out on a deal, but if you bid too low you won’t be able to change your bid after the title moves from Community Pricing over to Pre-Pub.

“The Importance of Creation”

The Logos Lecture Series is back already with what might be our biggest event yet! On Friday, June 27 Dr. Norm Geisler will present "The Importance of Creation" at Christ the King Church in Bellingham, Washington. The lecture is free to attend—you don’t even need a ticket to get in.

Here’s a quick description of what Dr. Geisler will be covering.

"With the explosion of the Intelligent Design movement, many Americans are once again forced to take sides in the long-standing battle between creation and evolution. Yet many feel inadequately educated on the judicial process of this battle. This lecture will discuss the biblical, Constitutional, ethical, legal, and educational importance of teaching creation. During the lecture Dr. Geisler will draw from 30 years of research and his experience as an expert witness in the "Scopes II" trial in Little Rock, AR."

Norman L. Geisler is author or coauthor of some sixty books, including The Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics and his four-volume Systematic Theology. He has taught at the university and graduate level for nearly forty years and has spoken or debated in all fifty states and in twenty-five countries. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Loyola University and now serves as president of Southern Evangelical Seminary. A few of Dr. Geisler’s works are also available for Logos Bible Software. Titles include Norman L. Geisler’s Systematic Theology (4 Volumes), The Norman L. Geisler Apologetics Library, I Don’t Have Enough Faith to be an Atheist, and A General Introduction to the Bible.

Event Details

  • "The Importance of Creation"
  • Dr. Norman L. Geisler
  • June 27, 2008 at 7:00 PM
  • Christ the King Church in Bellingham, Washington

If you are able please join us at the lecture. After all, it’s not every day one of the biggest names in apologetics rolls into Bellingham.

Please show us your work!

Do you use Logos Bible Software to prepare sermons or lessons? Do you create handouts or PowerPoint slides for your class or congregation?
If so, we’d love to see them. We want to make future versions of Logos Bible Software even more useful, and it helps us to see what you take to the lectern. We’d really appreciate it if you would email some recent samples to slides@logos.com or handouts@logos.com. We’ll keep them to ourselves, and won’t republish or distribute them. We’ll just look at them for ideas on how we can do an even better job of helping you prepare.
(Feel free to send files in whatever format you have them.)
Thank you for your help!

Genesis One As Ancient Cosmology

It’s time for another Logos Lecture Series event. This one features Dr. John Walton of Wheaton College, who will be speaking on “Genesis One As Ancient Cosmology.” If you’re in the area, join us at 7:00 PM on Monday, June 23, at the Mount Baker Theatre here in Bellingham, Washington.

About the Lecture

Dr. Walton will be discussing the controversy that rages between secular science and people of biblical faith concerning the origins of the cosmos. Whether the biblical account in Genesis 1 is being defended or questioned, it has often been treated as if it could or should be adapted to modern scientific terms as an account of material origins. In this lecture Dr. Walton will argue that reading Genesis 1 as an ancient text resolves the presumed problems that are the focus of modern controversy.

About the Speaker

Dr. John Walton is a professor of Old Testament studies at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He earned his Ph.D. in 1981 at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, Ohio. Since that time he has published numerous works through Zondervan and Baker publishing houses including the Expositor’s Bible Commentary on Jonah, NIV Application Commentary on Genesis, and Obadiah-Jonah: A Bible Study Commentary.

Event Details

  • Title: “Genesis One As Ancient Cosmology”
  • Speaker: Dr. John Walton of Wheaton College
  • Date: Monday, June 23
  • Time: 7:00-8:00 PM
  • Location: Mount Baker Theatre in Bellingham, Washington

8th Annual Logos Curry Cook-Off!

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, who works in the marketing department here at Logos.

Once again one of our quarterly cook-offs has come and gone. While there were some familiar faces in this year’s bunch, a few stepped aside so a new group of competitors could get a chance to claim the prestigious “Curry Champion” title.

The halls were quickly filled to overflowing as the inter-office email was sent out informing employees that the competition was underway.

As usual, the meal was blessed in prayer before the awaited array of curries and steamed rice was fair game. With the head-count nearing one hundred and fifty in the office, it was a mad dash to the front of the line to make sure a sample of the competing curries was available.

Once everyone had a chance to get their curry samples, side dish of rice, and a drink from the free-drink refrigerator, tasting each and deciding on a winner was in order.

After the votes were tallied, the cooks gathered in the large conference room and provided a little information about their recipe before the top three curries were revealed.

The number three spot went to Electronic Text Development’s (ETD) Anthony Apodaca and his Roasted Red Pepper Curry. Challenging for the number one spot was Paul Williams, also from ETD, who settled for second with his Number Two Vindaloo. And the winner of the 2008 Curry Cook-Off was Eli Evans from Design and Editorial, who prepared Red Pepper Beef.

The winners have graciously agreed to share their secret recipes with you. Enjoy!

See also the past Curry Cook-Off posts from 2007 and 2006.