Adolf Schlatter’s “Faith in the New Testament” To Be Translated!

In a never-ending quest to provide the best in biblical scholarship, Logos announces a new project to translate Adolf Schlatter’s 1885 masterpiece Der Glaube im Neuen Testament (Faith in the New Testament) into English.

Schlatter uses Old Testament, Rabbinic, and primary source documents to communicate the early church’s view of both faith and belief. Spanning twelve chapters and totaling nearly six-hundred pages, Faith in the New Testament is a philological tour de force.

Who Is Adolf Schlatter?

Adolf Schlatter was a brilliant New Testament scholar and theologian. Educated at Tübingen University and the University of Basel, Schlatter was a prolific author and professor for more than twenty years. He authored hundreds of written works, including influential monographs on topics relating to the study of the New Testament, biblical history, New Testament Judaism, dogmatics, and a number of critical commentaries. He was frequently asked to speak at conferences and fill the pulpit of local churches.

Take It from the Experts

“Adolf Schlatter . . . was theologically the most important figure in the faculty of Protestant Theology at Tübingen in the first third of the century.”—Peter Stuhlmacher, professor of New Testament Emeritus, Eberhard Karls Universität, Tübingen

“Schlatter’s writings hold rich potential for summoning serious biblical scholarship back to its classic sources, methods, and aims.”—Robert Yarbrough, professor of New Testament, Covenant Theological Seminary

“Because of his immense, unbelievable learning and his theological insights into the heart of the New Testament message . . . [w]e can learn a lot from him today, when the theological climate is changing, because he did not go trodden ways and always give new insights into the biblical texts, which many have forgotten.”—Martin Hengel, one time Emeritus Professor of New Testament and Early Judaism, Tübingen

Pre-Order Your Copy Now!

We are placing Adolf Schlatter’s Faith in the New Testament on Pre-Pub for only $39.95! This is an unbelievable price for an important contribution to New Testament studies.

Once we have enough to cover the cost for translation and production, the work begins. Order your copy today!

On the Road with Matt Chandler’s Explicit Gospel Tour

Scott Lindsey’s job is pretty cool. Since 2001, he has presented Logos Bible Software at more than 300 conferences, and worked with ministry leaders like Dr. David Jeremiah and Kay Arthur.

Recently Scott has been on the road with Matt Chandler and the Explicit Gospel Tour.

I talked to Scott this morning and mentioned that riding from state to state in a windowless bus didn’t look that appealing. Scott replied, “Yeah, I don’t envy the rock star lifestyle at all. It’s like being shaken around in a brown paper bag.” Turns out, high-profile ministry isn’t always so glamorous.

But Scott reminded me that exciting things are happening. Conferences like this give Logos an opportunity to partner with dynamic ministries.

On the Explicit Gospel Tour, Matt Chandler attests to the need for intimacy with God’s Word, and we get to come alongside and provide people the tools to build upon that foundation.

In the end, being able to equip people to grow in their understanding of God’s Word is worth a few days in a windowless bus.

If you can make it to Anderson, SC tonight, don’t miss an opportunity to see Logos presented and spend an evening with Matt Chandler! There are still a few seats left for the Explicit Gospel Tour at NewSpring Church; tickets are $15 at the door.

There are also tickets available for Saturday night’s Orlando, FL event!

Scott would love to see you there.

Celebrate Bible Study Magazine’s 10,000 Fans with 10 Days to Save!

Bible Study Magazine, the only magazine dedicated solely to Bible study, has 10,000 Facebook fans! To celebrate this milestone, we are offering a limited-time discount on Bible Study Magazine subscriptions.

For the next 10 days, you can get a 1-, 3-, or 5-year subscription to Bible Study Magazine for only $14.95 per year. Use coupon code BSM10K to start reading Bible Study Magazine for nearly 50% off the cover price. But act quickly; this offer ends Friday, April 27.

Subscribe today, and your first issue will include:

  • The Nancy Leigh DeMoss cover article—”A Timeless Message”
  • A discussion of the Heart/Mind Balance with New Testament scholar Scot McKnight
  • An interview with Joni Eareckson Tada
  • A special section on Proverbs
  • An 8-week study on James
  • and more

It’s not hard to see why more than 10,000 people like Bible Study Magazine on Facebook.

Bible Study Magazine’s Facebook community is truly one of a kind. Fans share personal insight, study methods, and Scripture, and we often print their Bible study tips in issues of Bible Study Magazine. That’s right, your Bible study tip could be featured in an issue of Bible Study Magazine!

If you haven’t joined the growing Facebook fan page, “like” BSM now. Then tell us how we can make the BSM community even better!

Improve your Bible study today with and pick up your choice of a

to Bible Study Magazine for only $14.95 per year! Use coupon code BSM10K before Friday, April 27, and save nearly 50%!

Students Save with the Logos Academic Discount Program

Seminary and college are exciting experiences, from getting your acceptance letter to walking across the stage for your diploma. That’s terrific, but this experience is often as expensive as it is exciting. That’s why we started the Logos Academic Discount Program.

Special Discounts for Students

The Logos Academic Discount Program gives students and faculty access to thousands of resources at reduced prices. This gives students (and faculty) the freedom to pursue academic excellence with Logos’ advanced tools without worrying about the price tag.

How Do I Qualify?

Qualifying for the program is easy. You must be a student currently taking at least three credits or a full-time faculty or staff member at a Bible college, seminary, university, or a similar institution. Once your application is approved, you’ll have access to special savings through the Logos Academic Discount Program.

Spread the Word

Do you know someone who is eligible for the academic discount? Send them an email, a text, or a phone call and tell them to check it out! Here are some other ways you can help get the word out:

fb1.pngFacebook: Post this blog article to your wall by leaving a Facebook comment below, post a link to https://www.logos.com/academic/program, or post the video to your wall!

tw1.pngTwitter: Post a tweet with a link to https://www.logos.com/academic/program. Not sure what to tweet? You can tweet this!

bl1.pngBlog: If you have a blog, you can write a post letting your readers know about Logos’ academic scholarships.

 

So all you students and professors, should apply today! We look forward to partnering with you.

Save Big When You Register Now for Pastorum Live!

Logos hosts Pastorum Live, June 5–6, in Chicago, IL.  This is no ordinary conference. Pastorum features 21 evangelical scholars known for publishing academic commentaries, monographs, and Biblical language grammars.

This conference is like Disneyland for me, a seminary student and scholar-in-training. It would be impossible to do justice to each of the speakers and their topics here; therefore, let me highlight a few lectures that I am excited about.

Craig Keener: “Across Cultures, Across Centuries”

Professor of New Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary, Craig Keener is the author of The Historical Jesus of the Gospels, Miracles: The Credibility of the New Testament Accounts, and commentaries on the Gospel of Matthew, the Gospel of John, Romans, 1–2 Corinthians, and Revelation. More than any other scholar I have read, Dr. Keener illuminates the culture and text of the New Testament with his encyclopedic grasp of first-century Greco-Roman writings. I am excited to hear what he has to share with Pastorum attendees!

Nicholas Perrin: “Jesus, the Kingdom, and the Church”

Nicholas Perrin is the Franklin S. Dyrness professor of biblical studies at Wheaton. Dr. Perrin is an expert on the apocryphal Gospel of Thomas, having written a both a dissertation and a more popular work on the subject. Dr. Perrin’s latest book is entitled Jesus the Temple. I am looking forward to Dr. Perrin’s lecture, “Jesus, the Kingdom, and the Church.”

Mark Strauss: “Use and Abuse of Biblical Languages in Teaching and Preaching”

Mark Strauss is the professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary. He is the author of Four Portraits, One Jesus and The Davidic Messiah in Luke-Acts: The Promise and Its Fulfillment in Lukan Christology. Dr. Strauss has been heavily involved with the NIV, serving as the vice chair of the Committee for Bible Translations as well as associate editor for the NIV Study Bible. With over 20 years of teaching experience, Dr. Strauss is more than capable of lecturing on the best practices for using Greek and Hebrew from the pulpit and lectern.

This is just a taste of what you can expect at Pastorum. If you look at the list of Pastorum Live speakers, you’ll see a hand-picked and diverse collection of experts who will help boost your understanding of the Bible from beginning to end.

Logos is now offering special discounts for Pastorum Live! Registration costs range from $99–149, with special rates for students, faculty, and church staff. So register for Pastorum Live today!


Last Chance to Save Up to 75% on 64 Authors!

All Logos March Madness deals will end this Friday, April 13 at 11:59 pm (PST). Time is running out to grab incredible offers like selected works by N. T. Wright for 75% off or D. A. Carson for 60% off! Find your favorite authors on this list—before the buzzer sounds on these deals:

75% Off

60% Off

50% Off

45% Off

Check out the complete list of deals before they all disappear!

Liddell and Scott: The Indispensable Tool for Classical Greek Students

If you’re serious about studying Greek but don’t have a copy of Liddell and Scott Greek-English Lexicon (LSJ), it’s time to consider getting the central reference work for all scholars of ancient Greek authors and texts.

With Logos, you’ll get the most useful edition of LSJ ever assembled. It’s the only edition in which hundreds of pages and 26,000+ articles of ‘supplement’ material have been integrated into the text of the main lexicon, allowing users instant access to the 1996 revisions and additions without flipping through pages. And like all Logos reference works, the electronic edition links to all the other reference books in your library—including over 198,000 links to the free Perseus Classics Collection!

“. . . the digital LSJ is a real gain and a must for classicists. (more. . .)”—Willeon Slenders, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, Radboud University Nijmegen

Add LSJ to your library today!, and get the most valuable lexicon available for both advanced and beginning students of classical Greek!

Need $1K for School? Apply for a Scholarship before It’s Too Late!

There’s a month left to enter our current Seminary Scholarship and Bible College Scholarship giveaway rounds. We’ll select this round’s winners May 10, and each will receive a $1,000 tuition scholarship and a copy of Scholar’s Library.

Kim K. of Lancaster, PA, is the latest recipient of our Seminary Scholarship. Here’s what she had to say after receiving the scholarship package:

“Thank you so very much for the abundant blessing of the scholarship and library! Both gifts will be put to great use for my remaining seminary studies.”

Apply Now

With one month until the next winner is selected, it’s not too late for you to apply. The application process takes less than 15 minutes. You’ll watch a brief video demonstration of Logos and then answer a few questions on the application page.

You only can enter once per giveaway period,  but encouraging your friends and family members to apply is like entering multiple times! That’s right—if they win and they entered your name in the “other” section, when asked, “How did you hear about the scholarship?”, then we will award you the $1,000 and a Scholar’s Library collection as well!

Apply to SeminaryScholarship.com now! 
Apply to BibleCollegeScholarship.com now!

Spread the Word

Post a link to SeminaryScholarship.com or BibleCollegeScholarship.com on Facebook, Twitter, or your blog. You could even send your friends an email or give them a call.

fb1.pngFacebook: Leaving Post to Facebook checked, leave a Facebook comment below, and post a link to http://www.SeminaryScholarship.com or http://www.BibleCollegeScholarship.com, telling your friends to apply!

tw1.pngTwitter: Post a tweet with a link to http://www.SeminaryScholarship.com or http://www.BibleCollegeScholarship.com. Not sure what to tweet? You can just click here and tweet this for Seminary or click here and tweet this for Bible College.

bl1.pngBlog: If you have a blog, you can help out in two ways. First, you can write a post on your blog letting your readers know about the scholarships. Second, you can add one of our web banners for Seminary Scholarship or Bible College Scholarship to your site.

Not sure what to write? Try this:

Need Money for Seminary or Bible College?

Tired of searching for scholarships? In just a few days, Logos will award at least two $1,000 tuition scholarships along with copies of Scholar’s Library through their Seminary Scholarship and Bible College Scholarship programs!

The scholarships are open to all students currently enrolled in an accredited theological Seminary or Bible College located in North America, or those who plan on enrolling within the next 8 months. All you have to do is watch a demonstration of Logos Bible Software and fill out a brief application. Once your application is submitted you will be entered to win a $1,000 scholarship and a digital theological library that, in print, would cost nearly $8,000!

How the Resurrection Transformed Peter, You, and Me

Logos Talk is bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

What Happened to Peter?

Like Steve Runge, I identify with Peter. Not only am I encouraged by Peter’s missteps,  foibles, and failures, but I’m also challenged by the post-resurrection dynamo that Peter becomes. For Peter, Jesus’ return changed everything; Peter is restored, commissioned, and empowered by the Holy Spirit. This brash fisherman who would hide and disassociate himself from Jesus (Mk 14:66-72) becomes the one who stands before the crowds on Pentecost—calling 3,000 people to repentance.

Peter, who had been hit-or-miss throughout the gospels, now gives one of the most impassioned sermons in the Scriptures. His message features this powerful testimony to the resurrection:

“Israelite men, listen to these words! Jesus the Nazarene, a man attested to you by God with deeds of power and wonders and signs that God did through him in your midst, just as you yourselves know—this man, delivered up by the determined plan and foreknowledge of God, you executed by nailing to a cross through the hand of lawless men. God raised him up, having brought to an end the pains of death, because it was not possible for him to be held by it.” (Acts 2:22-24 LEB)

The imagery of death being unable to hold captive the Son of Man is beautiful. I love the way that Bertrand communicates it in the TDNT, “The abyss can no more hold the Redeemer than a pregnant woman can hold the child in her body.”

Resurrection: A Living Hope

Peter’s sermon shows that something dramatic, something supernatural, had happened inside of him. And Peter clearly communicates the origin of this change in the salutation of his first epistle:

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who according to his great mercy has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead . . . (1 Peter 1:3)

Christ’s resurrection had changed everything; because of this, Peter overflowed with life-giving hope. This resurrection transformed Peter entirely, from his status before God (1 Peter 3:21) to his responsibility to others (1 Peter 1:22-23).

Easter is a good opportunity to ask myself important questions. Do I make decisions based on short-term gain or living hope? Am I still impacted and motivated by the resurrection, or, better yet, am I living in a way that only makes sense in light of the resurrection?

Peter’s life reminds me that the resurrection isn’t part of the Christian faith; it is the Christian faith. What reason do I have not to live boldly and courageously? I live on this side of the resurrection.

What does the resurrection mean to you? Let us know in the comments, and check out our discounted Holy Week resources.

5 Allusions to Psalm 22 at Christ’s Crucifixion

Logos Talk is bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

Psalm 22 stands out among the Psalms in its depiction of the psalmist’s agony and suffering. It is no wonder that Jesus quoted the psalmist’s anguished cry of “my God, my God why have you forsaken me?” as he died on the cross. However, this is not the only reference to Psalm 22 in the gospel accounts of Christ’s death. In fact, there are five possible allusions. None of these allusions refer to Jesus’ physical suffering; instead, they focus on the rejection and contempt He experienced while paying the penalty for our sins.

  1. Psalm 22:18“they divide my garments among them, and for my clothing they cast lots.”  The psalmist says this to portray how close he is to death. His enemies are anticipating his death so much that they have already divided his clothes among themselves. All four gospels describe this event with John taking it further by describing it as a fulfillment of Scripture (Jn 19:23–24; Mt 27:35; Mk 15:24; Lk 23:34).
  2. Psalm 22:7—“they wag their heads.” The psalmist’s description of people’s reaction to him indicates their scorn and derision. Both Matthew and Mark allude to this: “And those who passed by derided him, wagging their heads” (Mt 27:39; Mk 15:29). Just like the psalmist, Jesus experienced rejection and ridicule by people. How difficult it must have been for the Son of God to endure such contempt for those he was sacrificing himself to save!
  3. Psalm 22:8—He trusts in the LORD; let him deliver him . . .  for He delights in him.” In Psalm 22 the psalmist wrestled with God’s silence. Despite his cries, God did not answer or deliver him (Ps 22:1–5). Because of God’s apparent absence, this taunt would have especially stung. Only Matthew includes a reference to this verse as he describes the crowd mocking Jesus for His trust in God: “He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if he desires him” (Mt 27:43). Jesus also prayed to be delivered from His suffering, while still submitting Himself to God’s will (Mt 26:39). To be mocked for His humble submission to God’s must have been particularly painful for Christ.
  4. Psalm 22:1—“my God, my God why have you forsaken me?” The opening line of Psalm 22 beautifully expresses the anguish of the psalmist. He is suffering greatly, but his chief concern is that God—the source of his trust and deliverance—appears to have abandoned him. Matthew and Mark both attribute these words to Jesus (Mt 27:46; Mk 15:34). Jesus’ physical sufferings pale in comparison to the trauma of being forsaken by God as he takes the weight of our sin upon himself
  5. Psalm 22:31—he has done it.” Psalm 22 ends, not with suffering, but with praise as the psalmist worships God for delivering him (Ps 22:25–31). He enthusiastically proclaims God’s act of salvation and deliverance throughout the world and to all generations. The final line—which consists of one word in Hebrew—can be translated either “he has done it” or simply “it is done.” Jesus may be alluding to this when he says—with one word in Greek—“it is finished” (Jn 19:30). Christ’s dying words carry many implications: God’s plan of salvation has been completed; our sin is paid for; Christ’s work on earth is done. Perhaps it is also a shout of praise like the psalmist’s words in Psalm 22:31. It is finished. God’s ultimate deliverance has been carried out. Just as the psalmist proclaimed God’s deliverance of him, so should we proclaim Christ’s work of salvation on the cross to the ends of the earth and throughout all generations.

What crucifixion imagery impacts you the most in the gospel accounts? Leave us a comment and let us know, then take a look at our special Holy Week resources.