Preaching Revelation: Learn from an Expert

Dr. Warren Gage headshotDr. Warren Gage, professor of Old Testament and senior advisor to the president at Knox Theological Seminary, will be teaching a one-week intensive class in Bellingham, WA, October 14–18. Dr. Gage would like to formally invite you to attend:

Join us in Bellingham, Washington, next month and learn to preach Revelation as it was intended: namely, as a great encouragement to the people of God to persevere through suffering in hope of the heavenly city. To that end, it gives us the two most magnificent visions of Jesus in all the Bible. We see him in his heavenly splendor, coming to John of Patmos with a glory that causes John to fall at his feet like a dead man. We see the Son of man coming on a white horse of victory as the fulfillment of all prophecy at the head of his heavenly hosts of armies. These visions of Jesus transformed John, and he wrote them with the intent that they should transform us! [Read more…]

Your Best Deal: Upgrading vs. Buying Individual Collections

Did you know that if you purchase just a handful of the most expensive collections included in each Logos 5 base package, they can more than cover the cost of the entire library?

Here’s how the base packages break down:

Gold: four collections included in the base package cover the entire price ($1,549.95 before upgrade and ownership discounts)

gold

  1. Exegetical Summaries Series (24 vols.): $499.95
  2. The United Bible Societies’ Old Testament Handbook Series (29 vols.): $399.95
  3. The United Bible Societies’ New Testament Handbook Series (20 vols.): $399.95
  4. The Context of Scripture (3 vols.) $299.95

Upgrade to Gold and you’ll get 1,000 additional resources! Plus, you can take advantage of Logos 5’s advanced features, like Timeline, Bible Facts, and Clause Search. [Read more…]

Datasets: New & Enhanced in Logos 5

New Logos users often ask, “What makes Logos resources so much more valuable than their print or epub counterparts?”

The answer? Connectivity.

Most scholarly works connect to other resources through in-text citations, bibliographies, and indexes. Logos 5 converts all these connections into clickable links, making it easy to jump from open resources to undiscovered ones. In addition to the in-text connections, Logos 5 links similar information across your entire library. These networks of information are called datasets.

Logos 5 includes some important dataset enhancements, and 10 all-new datasets. You can see the whole list at Logos.com/Datasets, but here are some highlights. [Read more…]

Good and Bad Arguments: What’s the Difference?

“You can never reach another physical location: to get there, you have to cross half the intervening distance; next, you have to cross half the distance that remains; next, half again—no matter how far you go, half the remaining distance remains.”

That’s Zeno’s dichotomy paradox, and it’s easy to disagree with. It’s much harder to refute.1

It’s what’s called sophistry: “the use of reasoning or arguments that sound correct but are actually false,”2 or at least misleadingly strong.

But sophistry hasn’t always meant something bad, and the sophists—teacher-scholars who flourished first in Greece and later in Rome—are absolutely worth knowing.

  1. They made some key contributions to early Western thought.
  2. They provided the counterarguments against which Plato and Aristotle, pushing for objective truth and virtue, defined philosophy itself.
  3. They can help you learn to recognize misleading arguments, which, unfortunately, aren’t just an ancient phenomenon.
  4. [Read more…]

  1. Aristotle countered Zeno’s paradox by arguing that as distance decreases, the time needed to cover it decreases correspondingly. Archimedes, and modern calculus, found a way to calculate the sum of infinitely many terms as they get progressively smaller. Diogenes the Cynic simply stood up and walked. []
  2. From Merriam-Webster. []

Read Aloud with the ESV Audio Bible

A few months ago, we released Logos 5.1 with some exciting additions to the Read Aloud feature. Now you can adjust the reading speed, skip backward 30 seconds if you missed something, drag the progress bar ahead or behind, or scroll through the text to jump the audio ahead with you. With word-for-word audio-to-text synchronization, Logos remembers where you left off anytime you transition from home computer to mobile device.

See for yourself:

 

Now we’re bringing that capability to the ESV.

And even better: it’s free!

Pre-order the ESV Hear the Word Audio Bible free while it’s on Pre-Pub and you’ll have it added to your account once it ships. [Read more…]

New: Rent Logos Resources

We’re excited to announce our brand-new rental program. Now you can choose from seven resources to rent for a low monthly or yearly price and renew for as long as you’d like!

Here are a few reasons Logos rentals are awesome:

  1. If you’re on the fence about purchasing a title, you can try it out before you buy it.1
  2. If you only need a resource for one semester at school or one sermon series, you can rent it when you need it and give it back when you’re done. With the Complete Classic Commentaries Bundle, for example, you can search and study over 1,500 commentaries as you write your term paper—for only $49.95!
  3. Want to use a resource but can’t afford to purchase the entire thing? Now you can rent it for a low price and keep renting it for as long as you want.
  4. If you decide to rent a resource for an entire year, you get it for 12 months but only pay for 10—you get two months free!

Start renting these resources today:

  1. We don’t offer rent-to-own products. The money invested in product rentals only goes toward the rental period and cannot be applied toward purchases. []

Get an Even Better Deal: Lexham Bible Guides and More

Interested in making Logos’ own in-house publications even more affordable?

We’ve moved numerous Logos Bible Software publications from Pre-Pub to Community Pricing, where you and your peers can have a say in the prices of these insightful volumes. Bid what you think is right, and get your community to place their bids, too! Now’s a great time to get on board and set the prices as low as they’ll ever be.

Here are the products we’ve moved:

lexham-bible-guide-luke (1)Lexham Bible Guides

  • Luke: regularly $99.95—suggested bid is currently $50; with more bids, it could go even lower!
  • Ruth: regularly $39.95—suggested bid is $18
  • Jonah: regularly $39.95—suggested bid is $18
  • 1 Peterregularly $39.95—suggested bid is $20

The Lexham Bible Guides are your starting point for study and research. Each guide surveys all the relevant literature on a passage and brings the summary back to you.

As complete introductions to each literary unit in the Bible, these guides will bring new thoroughness to your research.

Lexham Methods Series

Regularly $299.95—suggested bid is $200

The Lexham Methods Series enables pastors to learn, refresh, or master the tools of biblical scholarship—and feel confidently equipped to share the materials with others. [Read more…]

Get Smarter Search Results

It’s important to make the most of your time in the Word. Logos 5’s Clause Search gives you more precise results—faster than ever.

Sometimes regular searches are just too broad. If you search for “heal,” wanting to find every instance of Jesus’ healing, you’ll be stuck wading through irrelevant results. But with Clause Search, you can define your search terms as specific parts of speech (verb, noun, etc.). Search for subject:“Jesus” verb:“heal” and you’ll find just what you’re looking for.

Check it out:

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Haven’t upgraded to Logos 5 yet?

Time is running out! The easiest way to get your discount is to use the Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator at Logos.com/Upgrade, but if you’d prefer to talk through your options, call us at 800-875-6467. Don’t wait—these discounts end soon!

5 Reasons to Pre-order the Greg Laurie Sermon Archive

greg laurieWe just released the Greg Laurie Sermon Archive on Pre-Pub, and you’re going to want to get in on this important collection of sermons by one of America’s most beloved and revered pastors.

Here are five reasons you should pre-order your copy today:

1. You’ll get a contemporary look at timeless truth

Reading a preacher’s sermons is not only a great devotional practice—it’s an insightful look at how Scripture is used to inform and encourage people from different cultures and periods.

A study of Charles Spurgeon’s sermons is going to encourage and convict you; it’s also going to give you a glimpse of how Scripture addressed late-nineteenth-century concerns. With the Greg Laurie Sermon Archive, you’re going to see Scripture applied to contemporary issues and ideas in the way that only Greg Laurie can.

2. You’ll strengthen your studies with powerful content

This collection features nearly 1,200 sermons! All that sermon content will show up in your topic and reference searches, adding significant value to your own sermons and Bible studies.

3. You can access these sermons on multiple devices

As with most Logos books, you can access Laurie’s sermons on your desktop, tablet, and phone, plus online at Biblia.com. This means you’ll always be ready to inspire or challenge yourself with these powerful messages.

4. You’ll get them at the Pre-Pub price

If you pre-order these sermons while they’re on Pre-Pub, you’ll get them at a special reduced price, and you won’t be charged until this resource is completed and ready to ship. This is a compelling reason not to wait—pre-order yours today.

 5. Greg Laurie is excited to equip you

Don’t miss your opportunity to get the Greg Laurie Sermon Archive while it’s on Pre-Pub! Pre-order yours now.

Why Postmodernism Isn’t New

ancient-philosophy-bundle“Every age has its own outlook,” wrote C. S. Lewis; “We, therefore, need the books that will correct the characteristic mistakes of our own period.” But we need more than that—we need books that reach our conclusions long before we do, books that remind us that our new outlook isn’t so new after all.

We call our times postmodern, often with something like fear. But postmodernism is in large part a renovation of ancient ideas—ideas you should know.

Postmodernists say:

“Right and wrong are human interpretations”

Though moral relativism has a postmodern flavor, it dates back to the ancient Greeks. Plato ascribed it to Protagoras; later, Herodotus assessed other cultures’ customs without questioning their rightness and wrongness. Later yet, Sextus Empiricus determined not that morality is relative to culture, but that moral knowledge is itself impossible.

Is moral relativism postmodern? Yes, in the sense that it exists today; no, in the sense that it’s uniquely characteristic of postmodernism. Before your next debate on moral relativism, you should read Plato, who, fearing moral chaos, argued that morality must be not only in the actor’s self-interest but also based on objective truth.

“But objective truth doesn’t exist!”

We usually trace this postmodern claim back to Nietzsche’s assertion that there are no facts, only interpretations. But it, too, has ancient roots: in the fifth century BC, Protagoras argued that “Man is the measure of all things.” Later, Plato and Socrates clashed with the Sophists over the nature of absolute truth: while the Sophists venerated persuasion and rhetoric, Plato and Socrates responded that the measure of an argument isn’t its persuasiveness, but its truthfulness.

Much later, Kant argued that truth is merely nominal (“true” means something within language), not real—not a statement about a thing’s essence. “Kant drew out the limits of our mind,” said Hegel, “and because of this we can not have a knowledge of the absolute truth.” But Hegel still found a way to truth: his “dialectic,” which, like science, moves from increasingly accurate oppositions—thesis, antithesis—to synthesis, the resolution that best corresponds to what is real.

“What we experience isn’t the world—it’s just our perceptions of the world”

modern-philosophy-bundleAgain we turn to Plato. In The Republic, his Socrates explains that without philosophy, we are like bound prisoners in a cave who, having seen nothing else all our lives, see shadows on the wall and interpret them as real things. Without philosophy, Plato claims, we mistake erroneous perceptions for reality; with philosophy, we see the world as it really is. Around two thousand years later, though, Descartes argued that wax’s physical characteristics reveal nothing about the wax itself: after all, its color, scent, shape, size, hardness, and coldness are all subject to change. George Berkeley took doubt even further, arguing that the world doesn’t even exist: only our perceptions of it do. (Sound postmodern?)

But Thomas Reid rejected that notion in compelling terms, arguing that common-sense belief in the world is the basis for all philosophy—that if you don’t believe in the world as perceived, the conversation is useless.

“We don’t have individual identities or souls”

Postmodernists from Foucault to Lacan to Riceour have argued that personal identity is unstable—that, without any essential “I,” we identify with images or stories to define ourselves. This thesis of shifting (or nonexistent) identity smacks of postmodernity, but it, too, is ancient. Plutarch wrote, in the first century AD, “Dead is the man of yesterday, for he is passed into the man of today . . . Nobody remains one person.” Heraclitus wrote that we cannot step into the same river twice: not only has the river changed; we have, too. Much later, Hume took Berkeley’s claim (“the physical world doesn’t exist”) even further, arguing that not even individuals really exist—we’re nothing but perceivers of perceptions.

But if the claims are old, so are the counterarguments. Spinoza argued that all things do have an essence, and that the nature of that essence is to persist in its being. Descartes argued, famously, that because we think, we exist.

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To engage with our time’s prevailing ideas, you need to know where they come from—you need to know philosophy, both ancient and modern. Noet’s Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles equip you with the core texts of the Western philosophical tradition: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

Pre-order the Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles today, or build your library with the comprehensive Classical Foundations Bundle—everything you need to understand the origins of Western thought.

Then keep reading—where did history come from?