Free Book of the Month: Horae Homileticae, Galatians to Ephesians

Horae HomileticaeCharles Simeon’s Horae Homileticae, Volume 17: Galatians to Ephesians is free during the month of May! Get yours now.

Charles Simeon (1759–1836) was a well-known evangelical clergyman. His most notable work, Horae Homileticae, is a collection of sermons published in 1832 to benefit the next generation of young pastors.

“[Horae Homileticae] is the best place to go for researching Simeon’s theology. You can find his views on almost every key text in the Bible. . . . What Simeon experienced in the word was remarkable. And it is so utterly different from the counsel that we receive today that it is worth looking at carefully.” —John Piper

When you download volume 17 of Horae Homileticae, you’ll get 12 chapters of scholarly, spiritually rich insight into Galatians and Ephesians. Simeon breaks down the Scriptures chapter by chapter, which allows his exposition to focus on the books’ important themes: the fruits of the Spirit, freedom through Christ, and more.

“Be Bible Christians, not systems Christians.” —Charles Simeon (click to tweet)

Download Simeon’s Horae Homileticae, Galations to Ephesians today! Then enter to win the entire Horae Homileticae commentary.

Have a quote or another work by Charles Simeon that you’d like to share or recommend? Let us know in the comments!

New Extended Hours and Saturday Sales!

New Hours May 4We’re extending our hours!

We want contacting Logos to be as convenient as possible. So for another 17 hours a week, we’ll be available to take your calls!

Our sales and customer service teams are now available Monday–Saturday, 6 a.m.6 p.m. (Pacific Time).

Take advantage of Saturday savings all May long

To kick off these new hours, we’re planning some exciting Saturday-only sales. Call or email us every Saturday in May to hear about the 10 new one-day sales.

Among today’s deals, we’re offering special sales on:

BDAG/HALOT Bundle

Regularly $274.95   Today only $249.95

Widely recognized as the authority for biblical Greek and Hebrew, the combined BDAG/HALOT integrates seamlessly with the rest of your resources. All Scripture references appear on mouseover and link to the Greek and Hebrew texts, as well as the English translations in your library. You can customize your library to automatically open BDAG or HALOT whenever you double-click a Greek or Hebrew word in any of your resources. [Read more...]

Augustine vs. Luther: Sexuality and Marriage

Augustine Versus Luther on Sin Sexuality and Salvation

Augustine and Luther agreed on many things, but the different ways they understood the first sin, its consequences, and its remedy continue to shape Protestant beliefs about sexuality and marriage.

Augustine and Luther’s diverging beliefs

For Augustine, in the late 300s and early 400s, the original sin of pride produced lust, which could be defeated through chastity. From him, the church inherited a sexuality shrouded in shame.

Luther saw original sin as unbelief, which led to pride—epitomized, in his view, by the Roman Catholic Church of the 1500s. For Luther, marriage was the remedy for self-righteous pride, and from him the church inherited an exaltation of marriage and sexuality.

Augustine fought personal issues stemming from his promiscuous pre-conversion lifestyle. His youthful lust drove him to find a lifetime of salvation in his relationship with Christ. He also battled two heretical groups and walked a tightrope of rhetoric. Forced to maintain the precarious balance between them, he didn’t pursue his theology far enough to reach an esteem for marriage and sexuality. [Read more...]

Christ Is Risen! The Eastern Orthodox Celebration of Pascha

Easter (or “Pascha,” the Greek word for “Passover”) has yet to come for the Orthodox Church. While many Christians celebrated on March 31, a full five weeks separate the celebrations this year—Pascha takes place this Sunday, May 5. Let’s take a brief look at not only the history behind these differences, but also the manner in which Eastern Christians celebrate the Lord’s resurrection.

The dating of Easter has always been a complicated issue, going all the way back to the second century. At that time, the main divide was between those who celebrated on precisely the 14th day of Nisan (the Jewish Passover) and those who celebrated on the Sunday following the 14th of Nisan. This variance came to a head at the first Council of Nicaea (AD 325), when that assembly of bishops decided to regulate the celebration to always occur on a Sunday, or what had come to be called “the Day of the Lord” (Rev. 1:10).

A 19-year cycle of celestial calculations was developed, and this cycle, connected with the Julian calendar, has remained in use in the East. An 84-year cycle came to be used in the Western half of the empire, and so the first discrepancy (since the first Council of Nicaea) began to occur. With the assistance of the best astronomers and scientists of the time, Pope Gregory XIII revised the Julian calendar in 1582 in order to improve its accuracy. A reform of the Western lunar calendar—connected with the dating of Easter—also occurred. [Read more...]

Earn Knox Credit at Camp Logos

Knox LogosMorris Proctor’s Camp Logos events help you master Logos’ powerful features. Now you can get academic credit for what you learn. When you attend Camp Logos, you’ll earn three credits toward your MA or DMin from Knox Theological Seminary—that’s an entire class’ worth! Find the Camp Logos event nearest you at MPSeminars.com/Camp-Logos.

Nine days of summer Bible study

June 20–25, Knox’s DMin program is coming to Bellingham. Dr. Warren Gage will be teaching “Gospel Hermeneutics 1: Typology, Symbol, and the Christ” at Logos’ headquarters. You’ll study parables, signs and symbols, allegory, and more, seeking to read the Bible as first-century Christians would have read it. Right after that, Morris Proctor will be teaching Camp Logos—again at Logos HQ—from June 26 to 28.

That’s nine days of immersive Bible study in the gorgeous Pacific Northwest. Come for the DMin class, come for Camp Logos (and its Knox credit!), or get in on both—you’ll want to be there.

Save your seat at Dr. Gage’s class and Camp Logos today. We’ll see you in Bellingham!

The Aramaic Bible: Get the Targums in English and More

targumThe Aramaic Bible is coming to Logos. This is a series I’ve been looking forward to for quite some time, so the sales team asked me to answer some basic questions, like “What’s a Targum and why should I care?” and “What’s so special about this particular edition?”

What are the Targums?

The Targums are early translations of the Hebrew Bible into Aramaic. They cover the entire Hebrew Bible except Ezra–Nehemiah (probably originally one book) and Daniel, portions of which are already in Aramaic; some of the books of the Bible have several different Targums. Some follow the Hebrew text very closely, while others contain significant additions and explanations. They’re useful for textual criticism or for resolving difficult passages in the Hebrew Bible (particularly those Targums that are older or stay closer to the source material), as well as for learning the diverse ways that the ancient Jews understood their Scriptures. Quite often, when I read someone commenting on places where a New Testament author “must” have been using the Septuagint (the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures), looking at the Targums will demonstrate that the tradition being followed may have been alive and well in synagogues without the need to reference the Greek text at all. The Targums also demonstrate the diversity of ancient Judaism, sometimes disagreeing with each other, sometimes differing in interpretation from material found in the Mishnah or the Talmuds. Some of the Targums, particularly Onqelos on the Torah and Jonathan on the Prophets, are still used extensively in Orthodox Judaism today. [Read more...]

Save 15% on Base Packages through May 20

Spring Sale

Save on tools for better Bible study

For a limited time, you can save 15% during our Spring Sale! Just use coupon code SPRINGSALE through May 20.

Whether you’re looking to enhance your daily Bible study, craft powerful sermons, or perform research for class, there’s a base package that’s right for you. On top of hundreds of resources, Logos 5 provides smart tools that allow you to take your Bible study deeper.

Powerful features

  • Bible Word Study—Understand the Bible’s original nuance. Choose any word in the Bible and find its Greek or Hebrew meaning. See where a word appears in your Bible, how often it’s used, and in what context it appears.
  • Bible Facts—Connect the dots between biblical people, places, things, and events. Bible Facts sets you up to learn more about people, relationships, locations, and artifacts.
  • Timeline—Explore over 8,000 events in biblical, church, and world history. Search by keyword or time period as you study specific passages.
  • And more

Through May 20, save 15% on Logos 5—just use coupon code SPRINGSALE at checkout! 

Get Logos 5 today.

Get 20% Off Tools for Exegesis

What’s the “right way” to interpret Scripture?

Since the emergence of biblical criticism, scholars have argued over how to interpret the Bible. Some think that the text’s meaning can be understood only when we place ourselves in the shoes of the people who wrote it (in this case, Jews living 2,000–3,000 years ago). Others think that the text’s meaning can be reached only through the divine mediation of the Holy Spirit, or some other source of direct divine authority.

From this latter camp, we often hear arguments that history simply “doesn’t matter”—that the text “speaks for itself,” and that further study about the texts’ language and context is useless at best and damaging to faith at worst. On the other hand, from those advocating “higher criticism,” we hear that the text “has no meaning” outside of its historical context—that in order to come to a consensus about the text’s truth (if such a truth even exists), we must see exactly as the writers saw.

And so the student of Scripture is torn: which of these seemingly irreconcilable approaches is right[Read more...]

New Eastern Orthodox Resources at Logos

Those who are familiar with Logos know that we are committed to building the best digital library of Christian resources in the world. As part of that commitment, I am excited to introduce myself as the new product manager for Eastern Orthodox content here at Logos. My goal is to ensure that Logos has not only the widest selection but also the highest quality of Eastern Orthodox products in the digital marketplace.

The Eastern Orthodox Church has over 300 million adherents, with the majority of its faithful living in Northern Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Russia. Since the 1800s, there has been a significant increase in the number of Orthodox Christians living throughout the Western hemisphere, thanks in large part to both the missionary efforts of Russian Christians to Alaska, Canada, and the United States, and the immigration of Orthodox Christians into both North and South America from predominantly Orthodox nations.
[Read more...]

8 Pre-Pubs You’re About to Miss Out On

There are 72 Pre-Pubs shipping in the next few weeks. We know this is a lot to keep track of, so we’ve highlighted a few of the bestselling Pre-Pubs to make sure you don’t miss out on the best prices.

The prices for all these products will be going up soon—some in just a few days. This is your last chance to pre-order these books at the best prices.

  1. Institutes of the Christian Religion
    This is the authoritative translation of Calvin’s Institutes. Not only is it the academic standard, but it’s also the most readable and accessible. It’s $69.95 after it ships, but you can pre-order it for $49.95 right now.
  2. Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: Old Testament
    This is the New International Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament, under a new publisher and a new name. Contributors include John Goldingay, Tremper Longman, Elizabeth Achtemeier, and other prominent scholars. The New Testament counterpart has been one of our bestselling commentary sets; don’t miss your chance to get the Old Testament volumes at a nice discount. The regular price is $239.95 for the set, but you can pre-order it for a little while longer for only $179.95.
  3. [Read more...]