Getting to Know Greg Monette: Faithlife’s Canadian Representative

Greg MonetteJust over a year ago, Greg Monette joined Faithlife as our Canadian market manager. Some of you may have seen him at conferences and events across Canada over the past year, but if you haven’t yet met him, here’s your chance to get to know him and hear about his upcoming events.

1. Tell us about yourself.

Joining the team at Faithlife was a proud moment for me. I knew I was becoming part of a special team of people working to improve the way the Bible is studied around the world. My one-year anniversary was this past October, and my pride in this company has increased drastically since I started.

I’m a passionate Canadian who cares deeply about biblical literacy in my country of origin. I’ve lived in Canada my entire life. Canada is home. My wife, Julie, and I have been married for six years and have a joint mission in helping the Christian community in Canada to become even more relevant in our own lifetime. The Gospel of Jesus Christ has changed our lives and we know the power it has to transform communities. We know about Jesus from the Bible and because of the separation in millennia that separates us from the person of Jesus it is crucial that people are equipped with solid tools to help them go deeper in their study of Scripture than they ever dreamed was possible.

This is what Faithlife’s signature software, Logos Bible Software, is all about. It is a time machine that takes us back close to the time of Jesus so that his message can continue to transform the world. I’m excited when other people discover the true meaning of a particular verse or passage of Scripture for the first time. There is no greater feeling than to know what Jesus’ words really mean!

2. What gets you excited about our products?

As previously mentioned, we are separated from the time of Jesus by more than two millennia. In order to comprehend his message, we need good tools to help us uncover the meaning of Scripture in its original context.

Logos Bible Software is a well-stocked toolbox that provides the student of Scripture with what they need to peel through the multiple layers that separate us from the intricate details of what the Bible really says. From original-language tools, commentaries, background information, archaeological discoveries, maps, and fresh video content describing the Holy Land, there is really no better toolbox that one could own other than living at Oxford, Cambridge, Duke, or any other world-class university full time.

Simply put, Logos Bible Software brings the best of the best of biblical research and study into our own homes and for our convenience. Millions of hours of research and development (by hundreds of employees and sub-contractors) has made this possible.

3. What’s your favorite feature in the software?

My favourite feature in Logos Bible Software is still the fact that I can have thousands of commentaries, theological works, and original-language tools on my laptop wherever I am. My library goes with me. It doesn’t matter if I’m in a coffee shop, in an airplane, at home at my desk, or on vacation. I have a library that rivals many Bible colleges on my MacBook Pro! I still find this jaw-dropping.

I went to seminary and would spend hours in the library checking out commentaries, then would use commentaries to hold open other commentaries so that I could write down quotations. Not any more. I just highlight the section from Logos Bible Software that I want to include in my research and copy and paste it into my document, and the footnote is automatically produced for me! This is my favourite feature. I would purchase the software if this was all it did. But boy does it do a lot more than that!

4. What add-on product can you not live without?

This is a bit of shameless self-promotion, but I won’t be able to live without a copy of my own book, The Wrong Jesus. It’s in Pre-Pub right now, and I’m hoping it will become a Logos resource in the next year!

5. What is your market like? Who do you serve?

My market is Canada. Yes, that’s a big market. Canada is the second largest country in the world in land size (next to Russia), though our population is only one tenth the size of the US.

I present at conferences across the country and introduce Canadians to Faithlife and our signature product, Logos Bible Software. People often think that my target audience is pastors. Although pastors make up a significant segment of the Canadian Logos customer base, the majority of users are actually laypeople. We also have excellent relationships with a number of Canadian seminaries and Bible colleges.

6. What are some goals or plans you have for your market?

My number-one goal for the Canadian market this year is to present Logos at more conferences than ever before. We know that when we introduce people to the power of this software, they will understand what the hype is all about. I can remember when Starbucks first opened up in Nova Scotia where I live. People weren’t quite sure about it. Now, everyone knows about Starbucks and it has made a great impression on Canadian coffee drinkers. I’m totally convinced Logos Bible Software will do the same thing in the Canadian Christian market.

7. What are some upcoming events you’ll be at?

I’m excited to be presenting at the Apologetics Canada Conferences in both Vancouver and Toronto in March and April. I’m also really looking forward to returning to Saskatchewan to the Women’s Journey of Faith conference this Spring. Jodi Kozan (president and founder of WJOF) has created, in my opinion, the model for running a women’s conference in Canada. These are just a couple of the many conferences I will be presenting at this Spring.

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Learn more about Greg and his work on his website,, or get to know him on the forums!

Earn Logos Credit: Become a Screencaster!

l6-overview-gold-featuredAre you a Logos power user? Do you show your friends your favorite software tricks?  Have you blogged about your favorite Logos tools or created tutorials for them? Do you want to earn Logos credit?

If so, we need your help!

We’re hiring Logos screencasters to create three- to five-minute instructional training videos. As a screencaster, you’ll teach others how to master Logos Bible Software by walking them through real examples and amazing discoveries.

Training videos are an effective way to teach others how to take advantage of Logos’ tools. We’ve found that when people see these demonstrations, they’re more likely to use the software to study the Bible. With your videos, you’ll help others learn to use Logos and engage the Bible on a deeper level.

You’ll get Logos credit for each video you produce, and the workload is up to you: you can create as many or as few videos as your time allows.

Do you have what it takes?

We’re looking for screencasters with:

  • A background in biblical studies or languages
  • A love for teaching
  • A high level of Logos knowledge and proficiency

You’ll also need to provide your own video and audio equipment for creating each screencast.

Here’s an example of a video you could create:

Apply today!

Don’t worry about sending your résumé; we just want to see what you can do! Send us a sample screencast video showing how you’d teach someone to use your favorite Logos feature, resource, or workflow.

Start earning Logos credit for your work: send your video to today!

5 Faithlife Groups Anyone Can Join

faithlife logoSome Faithlife Groups are just for you and a handful of other people—like your small group, or you and an accountability partner. But not every group needs or wants complete privacy.

You can join Faithlife Groups that use unique document-sharing capabilities, but there are a lot more ways to interact with your faith community.

If you want to explore Faithlife Groups but haven’t started one of your own yet, here are five groups anyone can join right now:

1. Prayer Partners

The prayer-list feature helps your group keep track of prayer requests. Prayer Partners is a public, user-created group that lets you share prayer requests with fellow believers who love to pray. If you have a passion for prayer, or want prayer yourself, check out this Faithlife Group.

2. Community Study Bible

There are lots of ways to use Community Notes, and this user-created group hopes to create a massive collection of insights from anyone and everyone. The group has over 150 members, and together they share thoughts on passages, notes from sermons, favorite verses, and more. If you want to see Community Notes in action, join Community Study Bible.

3. Natural Theology

To explore what can be known about God through natural human capacity, check out Prayson Daniel’s group, Natural Theology. The group shares and discusses quotes and articles about natural theology, reading plans and notes for famous works like Summa Theologica, and more. Join Natural Theology today and start a conversation. Or, grab some friends, and start a theology-based group of your own!

4. Faithlife Groups 101

If you consider yourself a hands-on learner, Faithlife Groups 101 is for you. Created by an experienced user, this public group gives you free reign to interact with new and experienced users (even some Faithlife employees!) and experiment with features until you’re comfortable starting a group of your own. Want to know how other people use Community Notes? Documents? Discussions? Ask away!

5. Faithlife Beta

Faithlife Beta is where users can make their voices heard. If you have requests about new features or fixes, this is one of the best places to go. If you use Faithlife Groups, join Faithlife Beta to give you a direct line to the developers who work on it every day. You can also use this group to test new features and provide feedback, so we can keep making Faithlife Groups a better tool for you and your faith community.

Faithlife Groups are perfect for small groups, families, and churches: start one today!

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With Logos 6, you get the tools of Logos Bible Software and the collaborative power of Faithlife Groups.

Get Logos 6 now and take advantage of introductory offers!

Meet David De Mers: Faithlife’s Australian Representative

david-de-mers-australian-repDid you know that Faithlife reaches over 190 countries around the world? In the last year, we even hired a few people to help us out in some of those faraway areas. David De Mers is our sole authorized Faithlife representative in Australia, but he also serves some of the surrounding nations. We interviewed David so you could get to know him a little bit better, too.

1. Tell us about yourself.

I am married with five children ages 24, 21, 12, 5, and 3. I have lived in Australia for three years now, though my wife, Kim, was born and raised in Manly, New South Wales, Australia. I am a permanent resident visa holder. I hold a bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University and a master’s degree from Bethel University/Seminary. Currently, I’m in my second year of doctoral studies at the University of Newcastle, NSW. I enjoy many things in life, but my love of God helps me better love my family, friends, and those just needing a helping hand.

2. What gets you excited about our products?

Faithlife products are designed to help all of us better understand, interpret, and live the Word of God as found in the Bible. All the Faithlife products are excellent, but the ones I find most practical and useful are the apps for my iPad and iPhone. I use the Noet, Faithlife Study Bible, Logos, and now the new Every Day Bible apps all on a daily basis. I find that the products we can use in a practical manner and on the go are the best.

3. What’s your favorite feature in the software?

I love everything about Logos. I have been a consistent user since 2008 when I first started my seminary studies. I could not have finished my master’s without it. My favorite features are the new contextual tools found in Logos 6. My master’s degree focused on biblical and theological cultural contextualization, so naturally I love these new features. Being able to access, view, and use the Cultural Concepts tool, the Ancient Literature tool, and the new Atlas tool helps me get a total view of the Bible’s contextual meaning.

4. What add-on product can you not live without?

My favorite add-on product is Noet’s Modern Philosophy Research Library that I added to my Logos collection. I love the new authors and content, and I find that the material complements my existing scholarly readings well.

david-de-mers-australian-rep-25. What is your market like? Who do you serve?

My market is all of Australia, and by default many parts of Oceania. I serve over 12,000 current Logos users in Australia, including church pastors, lay pastors, administrative personnel, and lay Christians of all types. I also serve a large academic sector here in Australia, and we are just beginning to make inroads into the huge private and public high-school market. I also serve the numerous Christian conference-goers here as well.

6. What are some goals or plans you have for your market?

I have ambitious goals for Australia in 2015. First, I’d like to offer consistent training classes at all the capital cities in Australia. Secondly, I plan to hold academic demos at more than 25 Bible colleges and seminaries in Australia and Oceania. This plan also calls for facilitating and presenting at about 15 conferences in the region. Lastly, as I mentioned before, I plan on targeting numerous private and public high schools, starting in Sydney and then moving beyond in order to ensure the schools have our Bible and language tools at their disposal.

7. What are some upcoming events you’ll be at?

For the first part of 2015, I have a heavy travel commitment to visit pastors in Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea. Mixed in with those events, I have multiple training seminars in Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane. Then on the schedule there are academic demos in Melbourne, Brisbane, and Perth. It will be a busy first quarter here in Australia!

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Learn more about David on his website,, or get to know him on the forums!

Our Long-Awaited Jesus

Luke 2:11

When I meditate on Christmas, I think about our Jesus—about the miracle of our Savior. About being free from my sins and being able to rest in his grace all because he came here to save us. But I don’t often think about the fact that people longed and waited for him to come.

Patience isn’t something that comes naturally for most people, especially when there’s no ETA. And waiting for Jesus had to require more patience than anything else we’ve ever waited for.

They knew he had been promised. They believed he would come. But they didn’t know when. I can’t even imagine how amazing it felt for those shepherds, who were just going about their day, to hear those glorious words:

“For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.” (Luke 2:11)

The Lord was here. Our Jesus had come. They would be set free. The Savior born was declared to be the divine Messiah, and an angel had been sent to tell them personally.

After all that waiting, he had finally arrived.

The hymn Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus puts this into perspective:

Come, thou long expected Jesus,
born to set thy people free;
from our fears and sins release us,
let us find our rest in thee.
Israel’s strength and consolation,
hope of all the earth thou art;
dear desire of every nation,
joy of every longing heart.

Born thy people to deliver,
born a child and yet a King,
born to reign in us forever,
now thy gracious kingdom bring.
By thine own eternal spirit
rule in all our hearts alone;
by thine all sufficient merit,
raise us to thy glorious throne.

He was the desire of every nation, the longing of every heart. Jesus, the best king they could ever hope for—their strength, hope, and joy. People didn’t care about gifts, or great food, or even good company. Their long-awaited Savior had suddenly come, and that’s all that mattered.

This Christmas, let’s remember what a miracle Jesus was. Let’s not take his birth for granted. Let us drop everything and bask in the glory of our long-awaited Savior, who was born on earth, would die to save us, and who will never leave us.

For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.

—John 3:16

Hallelujah, our Savior is here! Let us rejoice.

God with Us: The Birth of a Savior

Matthew 1:23One of the most fascinating developments to follow through the Bible’s storyline is the concept of God dwelling with his people. God, the creator of all that exists, gradually reveals his desire to be present and active with those who belong to him. Tracing this progressive revelation is cause for great worship and wondrous hope.

After God rescued the Israelites from Egypt, God commanded them to make him “a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst” (Exod. 25:8). God had given the Israelites new hope and identity by rescuing them from the Egyptians. Now, he revealed his intention to have his presence continually with them. Through both this “tabernacle” and the temple that followed, God lived among his people. How incredible it must have felt to have the Lord of all creation make his home with them!

Yet the tabernacle and temple were only a glimpse of God’s ultimate plan to draw near to his people. Isaiah prophesied about a coming “Emmanuel” (Isa. 7:14), a name which means “God with us.” In Jesus, God entered into his creation in a very tangible way. That the temple system allowed for the high priest to enter into God’s presence was astounding, but Jesus made God’s presence readily available to all. He did this in two ways.

First, Jesus revealed the character of God. He demonstrated the love, mercy, righteousness, and holiness of God in ways that we could easily see and understand. Following God was no longer merely about obeying commands, but about following the one who lived them out perfectly.

Second, Jesus made a way for sinners to come into God’s presence by providing a “once and for all,” perfect sacrifice for sin. The writer of Hebrews tells us that Christians “have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus” (Heb. 10:19). Through Jesus’ death and resurrection, God both dwelt with us and provided a way for us to dwell with him.

With the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, we get another example of God’s desire to dwell with his people. Through the Holy Spirit, God intends to be ever present and active with his people, both as individuals and as the church (1 Cor. 6:19, 1 Cor. 3:16). In words only fully grasped with an understanding of the Israelite temple system, Paul asks the Corinthian church, “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you?” Just as God’s presence dwelt in the inner sanctuary of the physical temple, so now his presence dwells with his church and with individual believers.

Yet the final piece in God’s plan to dwell with his people is still yet to come. In John’s vision of the new creation, he sees “the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God” (Rev. 21:2). John then hears “a loud voice from the throne saying, ‘Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God’” (Rev. 21:3). As we’ve seen time and again, God enters into our world, moves into our neighborhood. This passage does not read, “. . . the dwelling place of man is with God,” but rather “. . . the dwelling place of God is with man.” God enters into our world, our realm, our lives. He is the great initiator. And apart from his continual movement towards us, we are hopeless.

What a joy that our hope is not in “us with God,” but in “God with us.” Emmanuel.

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Continue exploring the Christmas story with limited-time Christmas collections, and find ways to enrich your holiday season with Scripture during the Logos Christmas sale.

A Chorus of Angels with Joy in Their Hearts

Luke 2:14
It’s easy to imagine what Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, or the Magi were thinking and feeling when they encountered the baby Jesus for the first time. I can imagine the mix of excitement, nerves, and expectation as they wondered when God would reveal the details of his plan and what kind of man this child would grow to be.

But have you ever thought what the angels of Luke 2 were thinking and feeling? I hadn’t until I read Rev. C.H. Spurgeon’s sermon on Luke 2:14 titled “The First Christmas Carol.”

Luke 2:14 records what the angels sang about the birth of Christ, overlooking a hillside full of sheep and shepherds. Spurgeon pointed out that, compared with the breadth of their experiences, this was a fairly humble job for a chorus of angels. These angels sang the soundtrack of creation, looking on as God spun into being all that we know. Several among their number had carried messages to kings and emperors. But on that night they carried a birth announcement to salt-of-the-earth people. And yet they didn’t hold back an ounce. They gave their highest praise. And Spurgeon said, “Methinks, they sang it with gladness in their eye; with their hearts burning with love, and with breasts as full of joy as if the good news to man had been good news to themselves.”

Why were the usually somber angels so delighted on that night? Because in the person of Jesus, all of God’s promises were fulfilled. All the attributes of God were manifest in a form that all men and women could see and experience for themselves. In the baby Jesus, God made himself accessible to us.

To the refrain they add, “. . . and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!” Not since the garden had true peace with God been available to mankind. Since Adam’s sin, there had always been enmity between God and men. The sacrificial system carved out an unsteady ceasefire, but lasting peace was finally possible on the night that God closed the distance between heaven and earth. He came to us because we could not go to him.

So as you celebrate Christmas this year, carve out some time to celebrate like the angels did—by giving to God the highest praise of which you are capable, and reveling in the peace that he made possible for you and me.

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You can continue exploring Luke’s Gospel with this season’s exclusive Luke Christmas Collection, or save on other resources this Christmas that help you dig into God’s Word.

Jesus: Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace

Isaiah 9:6

Isaiah’s magnificent prophecy spans not only history, going from creation (e.g., 42:5) to eternity (e.g., 9:7), but also geography, with an interest ranging between God’s own people through all of humanity (e.v., 2:2). Containing both words of hope and horror, its key theme is God himself, who is referred to hundreds of times.”

Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary on the Old Testament

In the first chapter of Isaiah, God expresses his dissatisfaction with the sacrifices Israel offered (Isaiah 1:11–16). On the outside, they are doing exactly as God asked: they sacrifice rams and bulls, fat and blood, lambs, goats, and incense. They honor the Sabbath. They have a system for remembering when to feast and celebrate what God has done (Isaiah 1:14).

But God says their sacrifices are meaningless. “I have had enough . . . I do not delight . . . bring no more.” Quantity is not the issue. Quality is. And it’s not a matter of extravagance. Their elaborate prayers use their lips and their hands (Isaiah 1:15) and look great on the outside (Matthew 6:5), but there is no heart behind them.

Other religions made sacrifices to their gods because they believed they were feeding them. The Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary says, “Popular Israelite religion frequently forgot that God was not actually fed through sacrifice and sought to manipulate him through such offerings.” They forgot why they were making sacrifices—they thought they had to feed the God who created the world. But God wasn’t dependent on the Israelites and their sacrifices. They were dependent on him.

The Faithlife Study Bible says, “An increase in offerings is meaningless without a change in attitudes. The sacrifice fundamentally represented Israel’s relationship with Yahweh, by which Israelites acknowledge dependence on Him. There was no point in going through the motions if they’d abandoned that dependence—either through idolatry or pride in their self-sufficiency.”

The sacrifices were meant to be an external symbol of an internal process: repentance (Isaiah 1:16–20). The FSB says “God calls for inward repentance after condemning the empty efforts of outward observance.” They were cleaning the outside of the cup, while filth festered on the inside (Luke 11:39).

The system God established for dealing with sins had been abused for too long. The death of innocent animals was not enough for guilty humans to see the error of their ways (Hebrews 10:4). The status quo wasn’t working. Isaiah called for change in the present, and pointed to a bigger change in the future (Hebrews 10:10).

Isaiah 9:6 introduces Israel to powerful names for a son who was yet to come. Wonderful Counselor. Mighty God. Everlasting Father. Prince of Peace.

The people of Israel didn’t crack open their New Testaments to John 3:16 and say, “Hey, that’s Jesus!” They looked to the current line of David for an immediate answer—someone who could live up to these prophetic titles. The Faithlife Study Bible reminds us that “the prediction of a future ideal Davidic ruler point ultimately to the Messiah, but immediate hopes for Judah’s future would have been directed at the Davidic line, continued through Hezekiah.”

But there was a problem. Some of these titles could only be attributed to God. No man could measure up to names like “Mighty God”—that’s blasphemy (John 8:58–59). As he so often does, God had a different plan than man.

People can’t overcome sin by their own power. The sacrifices which were once acceptable to God had become useless buckets on a sinking ship. God needed to intervene, or the world would drown in sin.

No matter how mighty God made a man, that man could never save Israel from sin—he himself would be corrupted by it (Romans 3:23). The names of this future son were only fit for God because God was the only one who could solve the problem.

They needed a Wonderful Counselor: someone who could give them the wisdom they needed to truly repent (James 1:5, Hebrews 2:18).

They had a Mighty God, but they needed a personal relationship with him (John 1:10–13, Colossians 1:15–16).

With Abraham, they were entitled to an earthly inheritance, but through their Everlasting Father, they had an eternal one to aspire to (Hebrews 9:15, Romans 8:16–17).

And to abolish the old sacrificial system which put a bandage on their sin, they needed the Prince of Peace to restore them (Ephesians 2:13–18, Philippians 4:6–7).

The Christmas season is a time to celebrate the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy: “For to us, a child is born, to us, a son is given.” Remember where that son came from (John 3:16), and glorify God for providing the sacrifice to end all sacrifices.

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Take some time to reflect on God’s Word this Christmas season: check out the resources available in our Christmas sale.

Win Collector’s Edition and a MacBook Pro This Christmas!

2014 Logos Christmas giveawayThe Christmas giveaway is here! This Christmas, you could win both Collector’s Edition and a MacBook Pro. Head to for your chance to win, but don’t wait—this giveaway ends December 22.

Win a library worth nearly $100,000

Collector’s Edition is our biggest base package ever, and we’re giving someone a copy—free.

The resources in Collector’s Edition are worth nearly $100,000.00; it’s an expansive library that’ll quench even the most passionate bibliophile’s literary thirst (for a moment, at least). You’ll get insights from major theologians, discover works on every biblical passage, and explore a wide range of resource types—including theological works, journals, commentaries, and more. In short, you’ll have the resources to study just about any biblical topic—no matter how obscure.

Here are some of the resources included in Collector’s Edition:

Collector’s Edition also includes all of Logos 6’s tools, like Textual Variants, the Propositional Flow Outline, the Psalms Explorer, and every type of search. And when they’re combined with this massive library, you’ll be equipped with the most powerful tools for any Bible study situation.

But don’t just take our word for how great it is—here’s what users have been saying about Collector’s Edition:

Excellent product. I’m extremely grateful that I was able to get the International Critical Commentary, Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries, Church Dogmatics, and various scholarly journals. This package is great because it is vast and appeals to pastors, academics, and everyone in between.

What’s not to like with over 5,000 resources . . . for $5,300.00. . . . Of special interest to me are the interlinears, Hebrew and Greek grammars, biblical theology and systematic theology resources. This is an outstanding set!

And if you win, you’ll be able to explore Collector’s Edition for yourself on your new MacBook Pro.

You’ll need a computer to run Logos 6. So, to top off the giveaway, we’re including a 15” MacBook Pro. You’ll be able to access your entire suite of study tools and resources from your new MacBook Pro, then take your Bible study with you on your mobile devices. Or, you could make someone’s holiday with a gift they’ll never forget.

Enter to win Collector’s Edition and a MacBook Pro today at!