God with Us: The Birth of a Savior

Matthew 1:23One of the most fascinating developments to follow through the Bible’s storyline is the concept of God dwelling with his people. God, the creator of all that exists, gradually reveals his desire to be present and active with those who belong to him. Tracing this progressive revelation is cause for great worship and wondrous hope.

After God rescued the Israelites from Egypt, God commanded them to make him “a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst” (Exod. 25:8). God had given the Israelites new hope and identity by rescuing them from the Egyptians. Now, he revealed his intention to have his presence continually with them. Through both this “tabernacle” and the temple that followed, God lived among his people. How incredible it must have felt to have the Lord of all creation make his home with them!

Yet the tabernacle and temple were only a glimpse of God’s ultimate plan to draw near to his people. Isaiah prophesied about a coming “Emmanuel” (Isa. 7:14), a name which means “God with us.” In Jesus, God entered into his creation in a very tangible way. That the temple system allowed for the high priest to enter into God’s presence was astounding, but Jesus made God’s presence readily available to all. He did this in two ways.

First, Jesus revealed the character of God. He demonstrated the love, mercy, righteousness, and holiness of God in ways that we could easily see and understand. Following God was no longer merely about obeying commands, but about following the one who lived them out perfectly.

Second, Jesus made a way for sinners to come into God’s presence by providing a “once and for all,” perfect sacrifice for sin. The writer of Hebrews tells us that Christians “have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus” (Heb. 10:19). Through Jesus’ death and resurrection, God both dwelt with us and provided a way for us to dwell with him.

With the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, we get another example of God’s desire to dwell with his people. Through the Holy Spirit, God intends to be ever present and active with his people, both as individuals and as the church (1 Cor. 6:19, 1 Cor. 3:16). In words only fully grasped with an understanding of the Israelite temple system, Paul asks the Corinthian church, “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you?” Just as God’s presence dwelt in the inner sanctuary of the physical temple, so now his presence dwells with his church and with individual believers.

Yet the final piece in God’s plan to dwell with his people is still yet to come. In John’s vision of the new creation, he sees “the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God” (Rev. 21:2). John then hears “a loud voice from the throne saying, ‘Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God’” (Rev. 21:3). As we’ve seen time and again, God enters into our world, moves into our neighborhood. This passage does not read, “. . . the dwelling place of man is with God,” but rather “. . . the dwelling place of God is with man.” God enters into our world, our realm, our lives. He is the great initiator. And apart from his continual movement towards us, we are hopeless.

What a joy that our hope is not in “us with God,” but in “God with us.” Emmanuel.

* * *

Continue exploring the Christmas story with limited-time Christmas collections, and find ways to enrich your holiday season with Scripture during the Logos Christmas sale.

A Chorus of Angels with Joy in Their Hearts

Luke 2:14
It’s easy to imagine what Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, or the Magi were thinking and feeling when they encountered the baby Jesus for the first time. I can imagine the mix of excitement, nerves, and expectation as they wondered when God would reveal the details of his plan and what kind of man this child would grow to be.

But have you ever thought what the angels of Luke 2 were thinking and feeling? I hadn’t until I read Rev. C.H. Spurgeon’s sermon on Luke 2:14 titled “The First Christmas Carol.”

Luke 2:14 records what the angels sang about the birth of Christ, overlooking a hillside full of sheep and shepherds. Spurgeon pointed out that, compared with the breadth of their experiences, this was a fairly humble job for a chorus of angels. These angels sang the soundtrack of creation, looking on as God spun into being all that we know. Several among their number had carried messages to kings and emperors. But on that night they carried a birth announcement to salt-of-the-earth people. And yet they didn’t hold back an ounce. They gave their highest praise. And Spurgeon said, “Methinks, they sang it with gladness in their eye; with their hearts burning with love, and with breasts as full of joy as if the good news to man had been good news to themselves.”

Why were the usually somber angels so delighted on that night? Because in the person of Jesus, all of God’s promises were fulfilled. All the attributes of God were manifest in a form that all men and women could see and experience for themselves. In the baby Jesus, God made himself accessible to us.

To the refrain they add, “. . . and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!” Not since the garden had true peace with God been available to mankind. Since Adam’s sin, there had always been enmity between God and men. The sacrificial system carved out an unsteady ceasefire, but lasting peace was finally possible on the night that God closed the distance between heaven and earth. He came to us because we could not go to him.

So as you celebrate Christmas this year, carve out some time to celebrate like the angels did—by giving to God the highest praise of which you are capable, and reveling in the peace that he made possible for you and me.

* * *

You can continue exploring Luke’s Gospel with this season’s exclusive Luke Christmas Collection, or save on other resources this Christmas that help you dig into God’s Word.

Jesus: Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace

Isaiah 9:6

Isaiah’s magnificent prophecy spans not only history, going from creation (e.g., 42:5) to eternity (e.g., 9:7), but also geography, with an interest ranging between God’s own people through all of humanity (e.v., 2:2). Containing both words of hope and horror, its key theme is God himself, who is referred to hundreds of times.”

Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary on the Old Testament

In the first chapter of Isaiah, God expresses his dissatisfaction with the sacrifices Israel offered (Isaiah 1:11–16). On the outside, they are doing exactly as God asked: they sacrifice rams and bulls, fat and blood, lambs, goats, and incense. They honor the Sabbath. They have a system for remembering when to feast and celebrate what God has done (Isaiah 1:14).

But God says their sacrifices are meaningless. “I have had enough . . . I do not delight . . . bring no more.” Quantity is not the issue. Quality is. And it’s not a matter of extravagance. Their elaborate prayers use their lips and their hands (Isaiah 1:15) and look great on the outside (Matthew 6:5), but there is no heart behind them.

Other religions made sacrifices to their gods because they believed they were feeding them. The Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary says, “Popular Israelite religion frequently forgot that God was not actually fed through sacrifice and sought to manipulate him through such offerings.” They forgot why they were making sacrifices—they thought they had to feed the God who created the world. But God wasn’t dependent on the Israelites and their sacrifices. They were dependent on him.

The Faithlife Study Bible says, “An increase in offerings is meaningless without a change in attitudes. The sacrifice fundamentally represented Israel’s relationship with Yahweh, by which Israelites acknowledge dependence on Him. There was no point in going through the motions if they’d abandoned that dependence—either through idolatry or pride in their self-sufficiency.”

The sacrifices were meant to be an external symbol of an internal process: repentance (Isaiah 1:16–20). The FSB says “God calls for inward repentance after condemning the empty efforts of outward observance.” They were cleaning the outside of the cup, while filth festered on the inside (Luke 11:39).

The system God established for dealing with sins had been abused for too long. The death of innocent animals was not enough for guilty humans to see the error of their ways (Hebrews 10:4). The status quo wasn’t working. Isaiah called for change in the present, and pointed to a bigger change in the future (Hebrews 10:10).

Isaiah 9:6 introduces Israel to powerful names for a son who was yet to come. Wonderful Counselor. Mighty God. Everlasting Father. Prince of Peace.

The people of Israel didn’t crack open their New Testaments to John 3:16 and say, “Hey, that’s Jesus!” They looked to the current line of David for an immediate answer—someone who could live up to these prophetic titles. The Faithlife Study Bible reminds us that “the prediction of a future ideal Davidic ruler point ultimately to the Messiah, but immediate hopes for Judah’s future would have been directed at the Davidic line, continued through Hezekiah.”

But there was a problem. Some of these titles could only be attributed to God. No man could measure up to names like “Mighty God”—that’s blasphemy (John 8:58–59). As he so often does, God had a different plan than man.

People can’t overcome sin by their own power. The sacrifices which were once acceptable to God had become useless buckets on a sinking ship. God needed to intervene, or the world would drown in sin.

No matter how mighty God made a man, that man could never save Israel from sin—he himself would be corrupted by it (Romans 3:23). The names of this future son were only fit for God because God was the only one who could solve the problem.

They needed a Wonderful Counselor: someone who could give them the wisdom they needed to truly repent (James 1:5, Hebrews 2:18).

They had a Mighty God, but they needed a personal relationship with him (John 1:10–13, Colossians 1:15–16).

With Abraham, they were entitled to an earthly inheritance, but through their Everlasting Father, they had an eternal one to aspire to (Hebrews 9:15, Romans 8:16–17).

And to abolish the old sacrificial system which put a bandage on their sin, they needed the Prince of Peace to restore them (Ephesians 2:13–18, Philippians 4:6–7).

The Christmas season is a time to celebrate the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy: “For to us, a child is born, to us, a son is given.” Remember where that son came from (John 3:16), and glorify God for providing the sacrifice to end all sacrifices.

* * *

Take some time to reflect on God’s Word this Christmas season: check out the resources available in our Christmas sale.

4 Faithlife Groups You Should Join Today

Faithlife-logoFaith communities are vital to healthy spirituality, so we built powerful tools for collaboration and sharing into Logos 6.

One of those tools—the Groups tool—brings Faithlife Groups’ collaborative power to Logos Bible Software. There are a number of groups that have sprung up as a way for Logos users to share their study techniques and insights. Many of these groups are all open, which means you can join them today!

Logos Author Collections

author_collectionsSearching a huge library like Logos 6 Gold for references to a specific topic, reference, or concept can sometimes yield thousands of results. One of the best ways to narrow your search is to create a set of personalized collections so you can search more manageable subsets of your Logos library.

I’ve found that some of the most useful collections are author based, and I created a group to share those custom collections. A few other Logos users—friends of mine whom I met through our community forums—have added their own, too. Logos Author Collections has a useful set of custom collections, and you can add them all to your library today by joining this group.

Logos Sample Documents

sampledocumentsResource collections are only one of fifteen distinct document types in Logos 6. To get a taste of what each of these documents can do, join the Logos Sample Documents group, which has a few examples of each document type. Some of the documents—like a passage list of the “one another” commands in Scripture and a visual filter for all the imperative verbs in the New Testament—make great starting points for new lines of Bible study.

Logos Library Theology/Denomination Tags

denominationalgroupiconMy favorite group is probably Logos Library Theology/Denomination Tags. A group of users worked for 18 months to create a comprehensive resource collection for every theological tradition, and this group is still working to tune their collections for accuracy and to account for new offerings as they’re added to Logos.com through Pre-Pub and Community Pricing. You can enjoy the fruit of their labor through this group.

Logos Product Collections

author_collectionsOne of our developers helped create resource collections for every base package, so you can search their library content easily and compare the different results from the various packages you own.

We’ve learned that many users prefer to build a diverse library by picking base packages from several of our denominational lines. For example: a users might combine Logos 6 Reformed Platinum, and Logos 6 Anglican Platinum to form the backbone of their research library. The Logos Product Collections group has resource collections for both so that you can individually search and compare each set of content.

Study with Logos 6 and collaborate with Faithlife Groups.

Logos Is Faithlife!


Logos Bible Software (the company) is now Faithlife Corporation.

We haven’t been bought; we don’t have a new owner. Logos Bible Software is still our flagship product, and we’re not changing its name. You’ll still find it at Logos.com.

But ‘software’ is something you download onto your desktop computer. And while I still do that—and so do you!—we’re moving toward a future where apps, websites, and digital content set the pace.

We have been leading that way for a while: Proclaim Church Presentation Software, Biblia.com, Vyrso, Faithlife Groups, Lexham Press, Faithlife Study Bible, and so much more. This video really makes the point:

All of these tools are connected by a single account—the same one you use at Logos.com, Biblia.com, Vyrso.com, and Faithlife.com.

And that’s your Faithlife account, from Faithlife Corporation, the leading provider of digital content and tools for the Christian church.

The simple summary: Logos Bible Software is a product of Faithlife Corporation. You sign in to Logos—and all Faithlife products and websites—with your Faithlife account.

Changing a company name is a big deal, and we’ll be working through the details for months. I appreciate your patience as we make this transition, and I want you to know that we are still the same team, with the same leaders and owners, and with the same goal: helping you do more and better Bible study—and more!

What’s Your Bible Study Personality?

logos-bible-study-personality-quizWhat Bible study personality are you? Take the Logos Bible Study Personality Quiz and find out! Share your results with your friends online, then start saving on over 30 books catered to your personality type.

Take the quiz now!

The personality types:

The Academic: Critical commentaries are the only ones you read. You’re always looking for the latest scholarly debate and diving in with your sleeves rolled up, Logos at your side.

The Book Lover: You own a ton of books! Your friends need a library card just to look at your Logos library. When you get money you buy books, and if there’s anything left you get food and clothes.

The Logosian: You own more than one Logos base package. You use Logos on a daily basis and witness to your friends about it. You wear Logos swag to church, and you often brag about that time you emailed Bob.

The Original-Language Enthusiast: You know the correct pronunciation of “Logos.” You are fluent in Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic, and you disdain reading English Bibles. Sometimes you start speaking in Koine to your friends by accident.

The Tough-Question Tackler: Someone wants to know about covenantal nomism? You’re on it. A friend asks about Barth’s revised supralapsarianism? No problem. No question should go unanswered.

The Bargain Scout: You love any good deal and are always one of the first to sign up for a giveaway. You love deep discounts and refuse to pay full price for anything. On any given Saturday, you can be found scouring garage sales.

Save on over 30 hand-selected resources

Once you get your results, you’ll have the chance to save on over 30 resources selected just for you.

Discover your Bible study personality and share it with your friends and loved ones—take the quiz now!

Pets That Love Logos

You know we’re passionate about bringing you the best possible tools for studying and presenting the Word. You also know we’re passionate about our mission to serve the church. But did you know we’re passionate about our family pets, too?

We want to see your pets! Post a photo of your furry friend with Logos merchandise and tag it on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #PetsLoveLogos. Then, check out everyone’s pets on our Tagboard.

With over 400 employees, we have hundreds of pets to choose from, but here are four that we think you’ll like:


Tallulah Kangaroola

This adorable baby red kangaroo belongs to Scott Lindsey, director of ministry relations, and his wife, Michelle. Tallulah particularly bonded with their youngest daughter, Havensong. When not curled up in her carrying pouch or playing with Havensong, Tallulah enjoys donning a soft Logos onesie! This onesie is made from 100% organic cotton—making it both environmentally friendly and comfortable, perfect for kids and kangaroos alike.



Louie the Rhodesian Ridgebackpets-love-logos-louie

Rhodesian Ridgebacks are known for the strip of fur along their spines that grows backward, creating a ridge. Louie is looking particularly handsome in his blue tie adorned with a Logos sticker! Louie is part of recruiter Jennifer Spoelstra’s family, and he enjoys long cross-country trail runs with Spoelstra’s husband, Jared. You can get these stickers in two sizes—each pack includes both large and small icons to fit any surface.


Kes the Canadian Sphynx Catpets-love-logos-kes-the-cat

With blue point markings and baby-blue eyes, Kes is a striking girl! She’s been a part of my family for nearly two years, but I don’t think she’ll ever be big enough to fit a Logos onesie. Sphynx cats are nearly hairless, with a fine dusting of peach fuzz that is usually thicker on the tail, toes, and nose. Kes enjoys cuddling, knocking things off the kitchen counter, and playing fetch.


Wolfgang the Hedgehogpets-love-logos-wolfgang-the-hedgehog

Tiny and spiny, Wolfgang is an adorable little hedgehog. He is pretty relaxed, often posing for photographs snapped by owner Chris Jespersen, a member of our video team. In this shot, Wolfgang broke out his party hat and climbed into a bowl—both adorned with Logos stickers for a Logos-themed celebration! If you’re a fan of Faithlife, you can expand your sticker collection with its green leaf logo, too.

* * *

We want to see your pets! Post their photos to Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #PetsLoveLogos, and don’t forget to include Logos merchandise in your photo! Logos carries a ton of items that you and your pets will love—from onesies and coffee mugs to our newest Verse of the Day merchandise.

Pick up some new Logos merchandise today, and show us your pet photos!​

Win Logos 5 Gold
by Sharing Your
Biblical Insight!

Christian Discourse

Right now, you can win Logos 5 Gold (a $1,549.95 value) simply by participating in honest conversations about the Christian life on Christian Discourse, then sharing your insight with your Facebook friends or Twitter followers.

It’s simple: the people who share the most with their community win!

Here’s how
to enter:

Step 1: Create a conversation or weigh in on an existing one on Christian Discourse.


Step 2: Share your insight or questions on Facebook or Twitter by clicking the button shown below, then clicking the social icon you’d like to share to (you’ll need to log in).


Step 3: Invite people to join the conversation on Christian Discourse.


Step 4: Continue weighing in and continue sharing to increase your chance of winning!

This contest will end September 16 at midnight (EDT). The top referrer will win Logos 5 Gold or an upgrade equivalent, and four runners-up will win the Lexham Bible Guides.

So, what’s next?

Share your posts with the friends who’ve impacted you with their biblical insight, and invite them to join you on the quest to win!

* * *

Christian Discourse is a place for honest conversations about the things that matter most. It’s designed to guide you in exploring Christianity through discussion. You’ll find conversations on theology, apologetics, devotional thoughts, Bible questions, and more—all tied to Christian living. Discover biblical insights from followers of Christ on our culture’s most pertinent issues and our world’s most pressing troubles.

The best part: you can join in and contribute to the discussion. Your thoughts and concerns matter—Christian Discourse is a safe place to share them with your family in Christ.

Join the conversation today!

The Heat Is On: Logos’ 2014 Curry Cook-off


On August 7, things got heated at Logos Bible Software. That Thursday was Logos’ annual curry cook-off. One of our company values is awesomeness, and our quarterly cook-offs are one way we live that out.

Though this cook-off was the first for many, it proved an incredible experience. We had eight entries featuring a fantastic array of flavors.

The winners were:

  • First place: Kiel Nation (Parvati’s Penance)
  • Second place: Peter Venable (Thai Panang)
  • Third place: Tie between Derek Fekkes (Thai Yellow Curry) and Michael Schoonmaker (My Daaling Clementine)

Participants dish out their curry entries for the judges.


Kiel Nation serves his winning entry—Parvati’s Penance.


Our judges enjoyed samples of each dish before selecting the winners.

Check out more photos from this event on our Facebook page:


* * *

Of course, the curry cook-off is just one of the many reasons we enjoy working at Logos. And we’re always looking for talented, awesome employees. Join in the fun—check out our current job openings!

Discuss Relevant Topics on Christian Discourse

Women in pastoral roles has been a massive topic of discussion in the Christian world for years. Right now on Christian Discourse, there’s a discussion happening on this particular topic.

Christian Discourse user Patrick Fore frames the question:


Christian Discourse

What are your thoughts? We encourage you to share them with the Christian Discourse community—offering your own biblical insight.

Christian Discourse allows you to have honest conversations about the things that matter most. It’s designed to guide you in exploring God through discussion. You’ll find it packed with conversations on theology, apologetics, devotional thoughts, Bible questions, and more—all tied to living out the Christian life. Discover biblical insights from followers of Christ on our culture’s most pertinent issues and our world’s most pressing troubles.

The best part? You’ll get to join—and contribute to—the discussion. Your thoughts and concerns matter: Christian Discourse is a safe place to share and talk through them with your family in Christ.

Join the conversation today.