How to Easily Locate Maps Related to a Passage

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Knowing the geographical context of a passage certainly aids in our understanding of that passage. To assist with the discovery of that context, Logos provides us with the Atlas loaded with dozens of biblical maps. There are numerous ways to access and use this tool, but today’s blog focuses on a power user trick causing the Atlas to follow us from passage to passage in the Bible. [Read more…]

What Book on Preaching Would You Recommend above All Others?

If a young preacher stepped into your office asking for your best book on preaching, what would you suggest?

Before I go further, I ask that you would answer that question in the comments. With a little help, this post can be a wonderful resource for preachers looking to grow their craft. [Read more…]

What Is Textual Criticism, and Why Is It Necessary?

The Bible was written at a time when the means for sharing documents were far different from the technology we have today. [Read more…]

All Your Discount Options on Logos 8, Clearly Explained

It’s official: the Logos 8 launch discounts are ending February 7. Log in to see your savings. (And if you don’t know what all hullaballoo is about with Logos 8, watch this video.)

You could save up to 40% on Logos 8 if you buy before February 7, so here’s the lowdown on all your ways to save.

Sign in

To save yourself time, simply log in to see your savings. Then you can ignore this post.

Your discounts are automatically calculated based on what you already own, so sign in before you start shopping, and you’ll see your purchase price on every option.

But if you want the deets, here they are:

New to Logos: 10% off

If this is your first time buying a Logos base package, take 10% off whichever base package you choose. It’s that simple.

Explore base packages.

Upgrading to Logos 8: 25% off

For your very first Logos 8 Complete Upgrade, you get 25% off. So that applies if you’re upgrading from older versions of Logos to Logos 8 for the first time.

For subsequent additions (e.g., adding Logos 8 Gold Reformed on top of Logos 8 Gold Standard), take 10% off.

Sign in to see your recommended upgrade.

Academic discount: up to 40% off

Are you faculty, staff, or a student? You could save up to 40%.

There are a lot of ways your discounts could shake out, so the best way to see your discount is by logging in.

But here are a few routes your discount could take:

  • Faculty upgrade: 40% off all things Logos 8. (And if you’re also a Faithlife Connect Essentials subscriber, make that 45%)
  • Student/staff 
    • New Purchaser: 20% off
    • Subsequent Logos 8 purchases are 20% off
    • First-time upgrader: 25% off

Explore your academic discount. Note: these discounts will remain in effect indefinitely, even after the launch celebration, as they are part of the Logos Academic Discount program.

Faithlife Connect subscribers (pre-launch): up to 30% off

If you subscribed to Faithlife Connect Essentials or higher before 10/29, you could enjoy these discounts:

  • New Purchaser: 15% off Logos 8 Complete Upgrade
  • Upgrader:
    • First-time upgrade to Logos 8 Library or Complete Upgrade: 30% off
    • Any subsequent Logos 8 library purchases: 15% off
    • Stand-alone Feature Upgrade: 5% off

Sign in to see your prices on Logos 8.

Next step

The best way to see your discounts is to sign in. Your discounts are automatically calculated based on what you already own, so it’s a sure guide to your savings.

And if while you’re shopping you want more help deciding what to get, see all your upgrade options clearly explained, take this quiz, or call our resource experts at 800-875-6467.

But first things first: sign in to see your savings.

5 Highlights in the New Eerdmans Theology & Biblical Studies Collection

Hang around seminary libraries long enough and you’ll start to recognize certain publishers.

And you’ll start to reach for their books more and more.

Eerdmans is one of those. They were a consistent publisher in my bibliographies all throughout Bible school and seminary, so much that I had the publishing city memorized (Grand Rapids). [Read more…]

Why Did Jesus Choose to Live in Capernaum?

Quiet Capernaum (Kfar Nahum or “Nathan’s village”) wraps around the northwestern shore of the Sea of Galilee. It’s surrounded by lush, rolling hills that invite easy living—likely the reason a large number of Jews migrated there from Jerusalem after returning from Babylon.

[Read more…]

How to Turn Your Sermon Audio into Transcripts Instantly

Since many of you are preachers and teachers, you may be interested to know that Faithlife Sermons now offers automatic sermon transcription.

Faithlife Sermons is a sermon resource and database for preachers and teachers, where you can find sermon illustrations, sermon art, outlines, and other resources. [Read more…]

How to Open One Guide Section at a Time

As you well know, our Logos Bibles and books contain a lot of information. Fortunately, our software also comes with a powerful search engine allowing us to retrieve most any data we need. With the release of Logos 8, searching became easier with the addition of search templates!

For example, let’s say we want to locate the passages in which Pilate is questioning Jesus. We know they’re in the Bible somewhere we just don’t know the exact location and we’re not quite sure how to find them. [Read more…]

The Names of God for the Needs of Our Hearts

Isaiah 9:6

Isaiah’s magnificent prophecy spans not only history, going from creation (e.g., 42:5) to eternity (e.g., 9:7), but also geography, with an interest ranging between God’s own people through all of humanity (e.v., 2:2). Containing both words of hope and horror, its key theme is God himself, who is referred to hundreds of times.”

Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary on the Old Testament

In the first chapter of Isaiah, God expresses his dissatisfaction with the sacrifices Israel offered (Isaiah 1:11–16).

On the outside, they are doing exactly as God asked: they sacrifice rams and bulls, fat and blood, lambs, goats, and incense. They honor the Sabbath. They have a system for remembering when to feast and celebrate what God has done (Isaiah 1:14).

But God says their sacrifices are meaningless.

“I have had enough . . . I do not delight . . . bring no more.” Quantity is not the issue. Quality is. And it’s not a matter of extravagance. Their elaborate prayers use their lips and their hands (Isaiah 1:15) and look great on the outside (Matthew 6:5), but there is no heart behind them.

Sinful hearts

Other religions made sacrifices to their gods because they believed they were feeding them. The Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary says, “Popular Israelite religion frequently forgot that God was not actually fed through sacrifice and sought to manipulate him through such offerings.”

They forgot why they were making sacrifices. They thought they had to feed the God who created the world. But God wasn’t dependent on the Israelites and their sacrifices. They were dependent on him. As the Faithlife Study Bible says:

An increase in offerings is meaningless without a change in attitudes. The sacrifice fundamentally represented Israel’s relationship with Yahweh, by which Israelites acknowledge dependence on Him. There was no point in going through the motions if they’d abandoned that dependence—either through idolatry or pride in their self-sufficiency.

The sacrifices were meant to be an external symbol of an internal process: repentance (Isaiah 1:16–20). The FSB says “God calls for inward repentance after condemning the empty efforts of outward observance.” They were cleaning the outside of the cup, while filth festered on the inside (Luke 11:39).

The Names of God

The system God established for dealing with sins had been abused for too long. The death of innocent animals was not enough for guilty humans to see the error of their ways (Hebrews 10:4). The status quo wasn’t working. Isaiah called for change in the present, and pointed to a bigger change in the future (Hebrews 10:10).

Isaiah 9:6 introduces Israel to powerful names for a son who was yet to come. Wonderful Counselor. Mighty God. Everlasting Father. Prince of Peace.

The people of Israel didn’t crack open their New Testaments to John 3:16 and say, “Hey, that’s Jesus!” They looked to the current line of David for an immediate answer—someone who could live up to these prophetic titles.

The Faithlife Study Bible reminds us that “the prediction of a future ideal Davidic ruler point ultimately to the Messiah, but immediate hopes for Judah’s future would have been directed at the Davidic line, continued through Hezekiah.”

But there was a problem. Some of these titles could only be attributed to God. No man could measure up to names like “Mighty God”—that’s blasphemy (John 8:58–59). As he so often does, God had a different plan than man.

Mighty God

People can’t overcome sin by their own power. The sacrifices which were once acceptable to God had become useless buckets on a sinking ship. God needed to intervene, or the world would drown in sin.

No matter how mighty God made a man, man could never escape sin and death (Romans 3:23). Christ overcame both in his death and resurrection, making a way for man to overcome both through him and him alone.

Wonderful Counselor

People couldn’t find their own way out of sin, either. They had not the wisdom.

They needed a Wonderful Counselor, someone who could give them the wisdom they needed to truly repent (James 1:5, Hebrews 2:18). Christ not only gives us wisdom by the Spirit through the word, he is our wisdom (1 Corinthians 1:30).

Everlasting Father

With Abraham, Israel was entitled to an earthly inheritance, but then what? As goes the earth, so goes the inheritance.

But through their Everlasting Father, they had an eternal one to aspire to (Hebrews 9:15, Romans 8:16–17).

Prince of Peace

And to abolish the old sacrificial system which put a bandage on their sin, Israel needed the Prince of Peace to restore them to God perfectly and once-and-for-all (Ephesians 2:13–18, Philippians 4:6–7; Hebrews 10:1-18).

The Christmas season is a time to celebrate the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy: “For to us, a child is born, to us, a son is given.” Remember where that son came from (Galatians 4:4–5), and glorify God for providing the sacrifice to end all sacrifices.

But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons. – Galatians 4:4–5


This is a revised version of a post that originally appeared in 2014. 

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Update: the survey is currently closed because we received the number of responses we were seeking. But your feedback still matters to us. Please use the comment section to tell us any of the following:

  • What you like about the blog
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